WorldCat Identities

Alivisatos, P.

Overview
Works: 20 works in 35 publications in 1 language and 265 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Bibliography  Periodicals  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: T174.7, 620.5
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by P Alivisatos
Nanotechnology research directions : IWGN Workshop report : vision for Nanotechnology R & D in the next decade by M. C Roco( Book )

5 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and held by 143 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book documents recent dramatic breakthroughs and prospects for even more important future developments in a wide variety of fields and applications of science and technology related to `nanotechnology', all involving the control of matter on the nanometer-length scale, that is, at the level of atoms, molecules, and supramolecular structures. As the twenty-first century unfolds, nanotechnology's impact on the health, wealth, and security of the world's people is expected to be at least as significant as the combined influences in this century of antibiotics, the integrated circuit, and human-made polymers. The book covers fundamental scientific issues for nanotechnology and reviews progress in the development of the necessary tools for nanotechnology research and applications (e.g. theory, modeling and simulation, experimental methods, and instruments such as scanning probe microscopes). It also surveys a wide variety of current and potential application areas of nanotechnology, including: dispersions, coatings, and large surface area structures; nanodevices, nanoelectronics, and nanosensors; materials science and applications of bulk nanostructured materials with novel properties; biology, medicine, and healthcare; and energy, chemicals, and environmental science. The book incorporates the views of leading experts from U.S. government, academia, and the private sector. It reflects the consensus reached at a workshop held in January 1999, and detailed in contributions submitted thereafter by members of the U.S. science and engineering community. It describes challenges that are posed and opportunities that are offered by nanotechnology and outlines the steps that must be taken in order for humanity to benefit from the advances that are envisioned. This emphasizes three crucial areas: developing a balanced research and development infrastructure, advancing critical research areas, and nurturing the scientific and technical workforce of the next century
Annual review of physical chemistry( Book )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual review of physical chemistry( Book )

3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual review of physical chemistry( Book )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual review of physical chemistry( Book )

2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual review of physical chemistry( Book )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annual review of physical chemistry( Book )

3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nanoscience research for energy needs : report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Grand Challenge Workshop, March 16-18, 2004 by National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop on Nanoscience Research for Energy Needs( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nanotechnology and the environment : applications and implications( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The book is a compilation of extended abstracts with introductory chapter material. It is the result of a symposium on Nanotechnology and the Environment: Applications and Implications presented from March 23-27, 2003, at the [225th] National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) [in New Orleans, Louisiana], sponsored by the ACS Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, inc
Food fight Going bananas ; Drugs downsized( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Pt.[1]. Food fight - A fish combined with a tomato? Rice fused with a flower? Pesticides built into our potatoes? These ideas may sound like a Hollywood sci-fi movie but they aren't. It's all part of genetic engineering--taking a trait from one organism and dropping it into the genome of another. This segment will look at the latest techniques of the world's crop creators. - pt.[2]. Going bananas - It may seem an unlikely subject for gene sequencing, but the banana is more important than you think. The fourth largest food crop in the world, the banana plant is currently being ravaged by disease and insects. By sequencing its genome, scientists hope to battle back and save this beloved crop. - pt.[3]. Drugs downsized - A human hair is about a hundred microns across; a nanometer is 100-thousand times smaller. Scientists are already building tools that can manipulate matter at the nano level. We talk to researchers who want to create oxygen-carrying nanobots that, when pumped into the body, could keep you alive for an hour after you'd stopped breathing. We hear from the opposition that fears deadly unstoppable "gray goo" of artificial life spreading across the planet
Nanotechnology what's the big deal about these tiny devices?( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Berkeley Entrepreneurs Forum invites notable entrepreneurs, industry analysts, venture capitalists and business leaders to present their business experiences and candid insights in entrepreneurship. This segment includes presentations by Paul Alivisatos of the UCB College of Chemistry, Larry Bock of Nanosys, Inc., Charles Janac of Nanomix and Scott Mize of AngstroVision Inc
Nanocrystal based solar cells by P Alivisatos( Visual )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Professor Paul Alivisatos discusses that semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit strong quantum sized effects. They may prove to be important building blocks for solar cells that exploit quantum effects explicitly. While quantum effects can easily be used to control the initial events of light absorption and possibly the earliest events of electron relaxation, the issue of facile transport in nanocrystals solar cells remains as a problem. This talk will describe two limiting types of nanocrystal solar cells, distinguished by the relationship between the size of the nanocrystals and the bulk exciton diameter. In the case where the nanocrystal is very much smaller than the bulk exciton, it is possible to make an ordered array of the nanocrystals and to investigate the possibility that mini-bands form when the particles are placed in the array. In that case, the transport between the particles may be facile. In the second case, all the elements of the solar cell can be built into a single nanocrystal, so that the charges need not hop between nanocrystals in order to be harvested. Practical examples of these two types of solar cells will be discussed
The emerging sciences of nanocrystals by P Alivisatos( Visual )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Inorganic nanorods synthesis, properties, applications by P Alivisatos( Visual )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Surface Modification Engineered Assembly of Novel Quantum Dot Architectures for Advanced Applications( )

1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This DURINT program proposed and undertook several ground-breaking efforts aimed at exploring novel and innovative composite nanostructures created from the integration of the two classes of nanostuctures - the epitaxial nanostructures (e.g. quantum wells) and the nanocrystal quantum structures (e.g. quantum dots). This Final Technical Report summarizes the objectives pursued and major accomplishments. The highlights include the following firsts: (1) demonstration of nonradiative resonant excitation transfer from adsorbed NCQDs to adjacent buried nanostructure, thus opening a new paradigm for potentially high efficiency solar cells; (2) demonstration of epitaxial overgrowth on adsorbed nanocrystals; (3) demonstration of CdTe tetrapod single electron transistors; (4) molecular dynamics simulations of organic PEG-conjugated SAMs on Au and GaAs; (5) demonstration of metallic nanoparticles based plasmon ruler; (6) atomic-scale characterization of adsorbed peptide-conjugated SAMs and their role in specific adhesion of cells; (7) simultaneous nanoscale spatially-resolved measurement of morphology and luminescence from living cells; (8) synthesis and photoresponse measurement of semiconductor (CdSe)-metal (Au) epitaxial composite nanocrystal Schottky junction
Nanotechnology Research Directions: IWGN Workshop Report. Vision for Nanotechnology R & D in the Next Decade( )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nanotechnology is the creation and utilization of materials, devices, and systems through the control of matter on the nanometer-length scale, that is, at the level of atoms, molecules, and supramolecular structures. The essence of nanotechnology is the ability to work at these levels to generate larger structures with fundamentally new molecular organization. These "nanostructures," made with building blocks understood from first principles, are the smallest human-made objects, and they exhibit novel physical, chemical, and biological properties and phenomena. The aim of nanotechnology is to learn to exploit these properties and efficiently manufacture and employ the structures. Control of matter on the nanoscale already plays an important role in scientific disciplines as diverse as physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, medicine, engineering, and computer simulation. For example, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes are ten times as strong as steel with one sixth of the weight, and that nanoparticles can target and kill cancer cells. Nanoscale systems have the potential to make supersonic transport cost- effective and to increase computer efficiency by millions of times. As understanding develops of the way natural and living systems are governed by molecular behavior at nanometer scale, and as this understanding begins to be felt in science and medicine, researchers seek systematic approaches for nanoscale-based manufacturing of human- made products
Moletronics II( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Molecular Electronics and Quantum Computing present very different challenges in the development of their potential for future information technology. In Molecular Electronics, the challenges revolve around effectively dealing with the potential for a very high density of devices. In Quantum Computing, a fairly small number of actual devices (bits) is needed, but the technical challenges of creating and controlling those devices are extreme
Opportunities at the Intersection of Nanoscience, Biology and Computation( )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research capabilities in nanoscience, molecular biology and computation have advanced to the point where it is possible to define research activities in which the development of nano-bio systems will support major DOE science goals. Specifically, we identify two major long term research goals which can motivate research at the intersection of nanoscience and biology: 1) Development of biological-systems-control for bioremediation, carbon dioxide sequestration and tailored biomaterials fabrication. 2) Development of artificial nanosystems with biomimetic functionality but without biological fragility. Basic research in support of these goals can be focused by identifying immediate research challenges involving the integration of physical nanostructures and biological nanostructures (i.e. proteins, with a strong emphasis on membrane-bound proteins) in a program of closely correlated theoretical and experimental research
Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, April 18-21, 2005( )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

World demand for energy is projected to more than double by 2050 and to more than triple by the end of the century. Incremental improvements in existing energy networks will not be adequate to supply this demand in a sustainable way. Finding sufficient supplies of clean energy for the future is one of society?s most daunting challenges. Sunlight provides by far the largest of all carbon-neutral energy sources. More energy from sunlight strikes the Earth in one hour (4.3? 1020 J) than all the energy consumed on the planet in a year (4.1? 1020 J). We currently exploit this solar resource through solar electricity? a $7.5 billion industry growing at a rate of 35?40% per annum? and solar-derived fuel from biomass, which provides the primary energy source for over a billion people. Yet, in 2001, solar electricity provided less than 0.1% of the world's electricity, and solar fuel from modern (sustainable) biomass provided less than 1.5% of the world's energy. The huge gap between our present use of solar energy and its enormous undeveloped potential defines a grand challenge in energy research. Sunlight is a compelling solution to our need for clean, abundant sources of energy in the future. It is readily available, secure from geopolitical tension, and poses no threat to our environment through pollution or to our climate through greenhouse gases. This report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization identifies the key scientific challenges and research directions that will enable efficient and economic use of the solar resource to provide a significant fraction of global primary energy by the mid 21st century. The report reflects the collective output of the workshop attendees, which included 200 scientists representing academia, national laboratories, and industry in the United States and abroad, and the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Nanoscience Research for Energy Needs. Report of the National Nanotechnology Initiative Grand Challenge Workshop, March 16-18, 2004( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is the report of a workshop held under NSET auspices in March 2004 aimed at identifying and articulating the relationship of nanoscale science and technology to the Nation's energy future
 
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Nanotechnology research directions : IWGN Workshop report : vision for Nanotechnology R & D in the next decade
Alternative Names
A. Paul Alivisatos US-amerikanischer Chemiker

Paul Alivisatos Amerikaans scheikundige

Paul Alivisatos amerikansk kemiker

Paul Alivisatos amerikansk kemist

Paul Alivisatos amerikansk kjemikar

Paul Alivisatos amerikansk kjemiker

Paul Alivisatos chimiste américain

Аливизатос, Павлос

保羅·阿利維薩托斯

Languages
English (35)

Covers
Annual review of physical chemistryAnnual review of physical chemistryAnnual review of physical chemistryAnnual review of physical chemistryAnnual review of physical chemistryNanotechnology and the environment : applications and implications