WorldCat Identities

WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)

Overview
Works: 244 works in 260 publications in 1 language and 260 library holdings
Publication Timeline
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Publications about WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.) Publications about WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)
Publications by WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.) Publications by WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)
Most widely held works about WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)
 
Most widely held works by WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)
Courtroom doctors ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The topic of this program is the use of forensic medicine in scientific crime detection. A film shows Dr. Russell S. Fisher, lecturer in forensic medicine at Johns Hopkins University and chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, at work in his lab. He is assisted by a team consisting of a secretary, chemists, a photographic specialist, doctors, police, and specialists in the physical sciences. In dealing with crimes of violence or mysterious death, Dr. Fisher asks: Who is the victim? Is it murder or suicide? When did it happen? How did it happen? Who did it? He shows a photo of a charred body and explains when and how the death occurred and the importance of an autopsy and a post-mortem examination. Dr. Fisher compares blood samples and explains how they are used by a courtroom doctor to exonerate or convict the accused. Using sketches from Lynn Poole's book "Science, the Super Sleuth," Dr. Fisher describes what he looks for in knifing murders. He also tells the case of the arsenic in the pancake flour and demonstrates how the presence of arsenic was confirmed. Lynn Poole shows snapshots of Dr. Fisher as a student in the toxicology lab at Georgia Tech as well as photos from throughout his career in forensic medicine. Dr. Fisher says that this career is different and challenging every day and that there are many opportunities for medical examiners and other trained specialists, with salaries from $17,000-20,000
News from the sky ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
BBC Producer Andrew Miller-Jones introduces this second exchange program produced in Baltimore and sent to Great Britain. Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab, sponsored by the Navy's Bureau of Ordinance, is featured. Dr. Gibson discusses cosmic rays and instruments used to do research on the effects of high altitude flying. Mr. Riblet explains how telemetering works and shows instruments used to transmit information from a distance. Mr. Miller-Jones exhibits cameras developed by Clyde T. Holiday to take photos in outer space and some of the pictures and films taken by these cameras. A chart shows the current maximum altitude of flight (nearly 80,000 feet) and the effects of altitude on pilots. A pilot tests the U. S. Air Force-developed pressure suit, and pictures show the U. S. Navy full-pressure suit
The usefulness of useless knowledge ( Visual )
2 editions published between 1952 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Dr. Abel Wolman describes the purpose of a university as a place to search for truth without interference. When research is in its initial stages, the information generated does not appear to have any useful application. By using case studies, the show demonstrates that basic research can have profound implications. Dr. Wolman provides some examples of how seemingly insignificant research can lead to important discoveries: Josiah Willard Gibbs, professor of theoretical physics; Henry A. Rowland, builder of the engine for ruling diffraction gratings; and Ira Remsen, developer of saccharine. Next, Dr. Francis Schwenkter describes recent medical inventions, instruments, and investigations that revolutionized the world: the circulation of spinal fluid, the properties of folic acid, and the treatment of blue babies, cancer, and rickets
X-ray, the super sleuth ( Visual )
2 editions published between 1990 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
At the beginning of this film, Lynn Poole provides a brief history of the development of the X-ray (1895). Then Russell H. Morgan, the chief of radiology at Johns Hopkins University, demonstrates the old fluoroscope and its dim images. He then demonstrates a new machine which he developed. The new machine is a fluoroscope with a brighter screen where the X-ray image is amplified and the movement of the body can be shown. Finally, two physicians, Dr. Paul C. Hodges at the University of Chicago and Dr. Waldron Sennett at the U.S. Marine Hospital in New York City, view the images of a man injured by a lathe on the job, and through television, make a diagnosis and suggest treatment
Science of toys ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In a dramatization of a child's visit to a toy store, Mr. Poole and the storekeeper explain how certain toys work. For example, wind-up cars exhibit potential energy while other cars rely on friction or inertia. The angular momentum of the gyroscope toy is the same principle used in ships and airplanes. The dunking bird toy functions because of the methyl chloride within. Electric trains and steam engines are explained in relation to Sir Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion. Musical toys, kaleidoscopes, Slinkies, and toy helicopters all have a scientific basis
The fight against polio ( Visual )
2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The program begins with a tour of the Children's Hospital School of Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Raymond Lenhard describes the symptoms of poliomyelitis, or infantile paralysis, and treatment of the disease. In the exercise room, a physical therapist demonstrates the muscle test for fingers and shoulders and how patients progress from simple to complex exercises. Patients are shown in crutches and leg braces, in the rocking bed, and in the treatment pool doing underwater exercises. "Iron lung" respirators are demonstrated and explained. Lynn Poole interviews two patients who recovered from polio, and he alludes to research being done in polio immunization
Highlights in review ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Host Lynn Poole reviews highlights of programs from the past year: "Freezing the Atom" (10/10/50) shows how atoms are slowed down and the development of the bolometer; "Electronics at Work in a Vacuum"(10/25/50) describes the development of the vacuum tube and the principles behind it, using puffed wheat in a jar as an example; "Your Questions About Science" (12/26/50) explains and demonstrates atomic chain reaction or nuclear fission using mouse traps and sugar cubes; "The Unbreakable Laws of the Universe" (1/2/51) explains the physical laws governing all things: inertia, action and equal reaction, conservation of motion, gravity, and atmospheric pressure; "Fight Against Polio" (1/16/51) filmed at the Children's Hospital in Baltimore, MD, shows how polio victims are being strengthened and restored to a normal life; "Don't Take Your Heart for Granted" (2/13/51) describes what the heart is, what can happen to it, and how to take care of it; "Archaeology: Key to the Past" (3/13/51) looks at the work of archaeologists and their study of the lost civilization of the Etruscans; "Cancer Will Be Conquered" (4/10/51) features Dr. Gey describing the differences between normal and cancerous cells and showing a magnified, live view of the separation of normal and abnormal human cells; "Is There Science in Art?" (2/27/51) reveals the science of cleaning varnish and dirt from old paintings at the Walters Art Gallery and the art of using x-rays and ultraviolet light to restore old paintings to their original intent. Poole also thanks the studio staff and mentions other favorite programs: "Fear" (103/50), "X-Ray, the Super Sleuth" (12/5/50), "Stream Pollution" (5/1/51), "Don't Drink That Water" (3/20/51), "Schistosomiasis" (11/21/50), and "Magnificent Microscope" (5/15/51)
Is it true? ( Visual )
2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This program consists of experiments to prove the facts of science and disprove the myths. For example, a copper penny is not a good substitute for an electrical fuse because the fuse is insurance against an overload, and a penny will overheat the wires and cause a fire. Dr. Richard Lazarus points out that not all psychiatrists diagnose and treat mental illness and abnormal behavior. He explains the difference between a psychiatrist and a psychologist and the various interests in the latter's field, such as market research, human engineering, learning styles, and stress reactions. Other misconceptions this program seeks to dispel are that small flies are "baby" flies (they're all in the adult stage); that spontaneous generation occurs, as believed by Hermann von Helmholtz in the 19th century; that people can be hypnotized against their will; that frozen body parts should be rubbed with snow; that ice always keeps things cold; that water can put out any fire; and other superstitions mentioned briefly
Schistosomiasis ( Visual )
2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The program opens with a film visit to the National Institutes of Health labs in Bethesda, MD. Dr. Tomlinson explains the life cycle of schistosomes via snails to humans. Dr. Wright describes the characteristics of the disease and shows films of victims of the parasite. He also explains how U.S. troops fighting in the South Pacific could bathe in infested streams and bring the parasite to the U.S. unless they use chemical repellants on their clothing and body. Dr. Cram describes her team's search for a U.S. snail that could serve as a host for schistosomiasis. The NIH schistosomiasis snail study collection from around the world is displayed. Dr. Nolan describes her search for a safe chemical compound to pour into waterways to kill snails on a large scale, and she demonstrates how it works
Is X-ray harmful? ( Visual )
2 editions published between 1957 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Lynn Poole discusses x-rays for treatment and diagnosis of disease and displays a recent report from the National Academy or Sciences and National Research Council on the biological effects of radiation. Dr. Russell Morgan, Director of Radiology Dept. at Johns Hopkins University, fields questions from members of the press: Nate Hazeltine, a "Washington Post" science writer; Pare Lorentz, a film producer; and Earl Ubell, a reporter and science editor with the "New York Herald Tribune". Dr. Morgan explains that x-rays affect both individual cells and the whole body, making them more susceptible to premature aging. He discusses the research by John Lawrence on the effects of radiation on mice and their extrapolation to man. He also notes a study on radiation vs. non-radiation workers that showed no difference in life spans of the two groups. It is the amount of radiation exposure that determines the effects of the damage. For example, a chest x-ray only delivers about 1/20th roentgen, a unit of radiation. However, Dr. Morgan discusses the feasibility of a reporting system for patients' total x-ray exposure and the need for a set of standards. And he does admit that the complexity and amount of radiation exposure is increasing in diagnostic studies and could double by 1960-65. A film clip demonstrates that this radiation exposure can be reduced by filtration, distance from the x-ray machine, length of time of exposure, and protection of areas not being radiated. Mr. Poole points out that Dr. Morgan has developed a fluoroscopy machine reducing by up to ten times the radiation time. In conclusion, Dr. Morgan discusses whether the Atomic Energy Commission or the U.S. Public Health Services should be responsible for the public's radiation health problems
Science coast to coast ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This program focuses on the scientific achievements of four U. S. universities. At Indiana University, Vaclav Hlavaty solved the differential equations of unified gravitational and electromagnetic field thus providing proof for Einstein's unified field theory. Erwin Schrodinger and Karl Schwarzschild, pioneers in this research, are also discussed. From the New York University, Dr. Serge A. Korff directed a study of the effects of cosmic radiation from a high altitude observatory built on Mt. Wrangell in Alaska. His plane pilot was Dr. Terris Moore, president of the University of Alaska. University of Pittsburgh's Dr. Buchsbaum, professor of zoology, worked with colleagues to research how cells bathed in a nutrient fluid react to drugs and disease. A film shows these cell reactions under a phase-contrast microscope. Under the direction of Henry J. Gomberg, William Kerr, assistant director of the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project and assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan are investigating peaceful uses of atomic energy. They have developed a beta ray microscope that uses radioactive isotopes as tracers in specimens under microscopic investigation. This allows them to see how atoms are distributed in alloys and tracing the path of carbon in plants
The archaeologist ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Lynn Poole describes what archaeologists do and why. Dr. William F. Albright explains how to determine the age of an object by datable style and carbon-14 testing. He then shows slides and diagrams of the Hajar bin Humeid mounds in south Arabia. As authenticator of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Dr. Albright discusses authentication methods for writings and scripts, such as comparing changes in the Hebrew alphabet and dated documents of the same period. Lastly, he describes qualities required for becoming an archaeologist
Life in a drop of water ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Lynn Poole explains that "microscope" is from the two Greek words "mikros," small, and "skopos," a watcher. He notes that Dutch Antony Van Leeuwenhoek and English Robert Hooke were both instrumental in the development of the instrument and that Charles A. Spencer was America's first microscope maker. Dr. Schwartz, using the RCA Vidicon (a microscope connected to a television monitor), shows slides of water specimens from ponds in New York and New Jersey. The organisms he identifies include one-celled blepharisma and stentor, which he compares to the multi-celled rotifer, the plant spirogyra, diatoms, and the beating heart of a daphnia or water flea. Dr. Schwartz also shows a replica of Van Leeuwenhoek's microscope and his drawings of bacteria, and he demonstrates how to make a slide for viewing
Stars in your skies ( Visual )
2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The program begins with a discussion of the solar system with the sun in the center and the nine planets, with their satellites or moons. Comets also travel around the sun in very irregular orbits. Great clusters of billions of stars form galaxies. The earth is near the center of the galaxy known as the Milky Way. Stars are arranged into the constellations that have distinctive configurations
Don't drink that water ( Visual )
2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Telegrams from educators and scholars mark the third anniversary of the Johns Hopkins Science Review. Dr. Abel Wolman summarizes the history of methods of acquiring pure water and the science of sanitary engineering. Chlorine was discovered to be a reliable and practical chemical to use to kill water-borne bacteria. Dr. Wolman also shows a film of microscopic organisms and silt in water and discusses the decline of typhoid fever. Dr. Wolman and his colleagues use both animated films and models of a water filtration plant and a sewage treatment plant to explain the water purification processes
The librarian ( Visual )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland is shown as a good example of a large urban public library system. Acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and reference functions are discussed as librarians and other library staff help patrons. James Dickson, a librarian at the Pratt Library, says that libraries contain much more than books as he shows maps, films, records and other materials. He talks about his educational background and what led him into librarianship. A good general college education followed by a masters degree in library science is needed to beome a librarian
Little known metals ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Little known metals with valuable applications are discussed. Titanium being much lighter than steel has important military applications; vitalium, an alloy of cobalt, chromium and molybdenum, is used to join and strengthen bones; tantalum is used in skull plates; mercury has many applications including: lipsticks, television vacuum tubes, antiseptics, insecticides, and photograhic developing; selenium is used in light meters and to conduct electricity; cerium emits sparks and is used in cigarette lighters; germanium is used to make transistors, which can replace vacuum tubes in the telephone, radio, and television industries
Sound and hearing ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Determining the levels of hearing loss in young children can be measured by noting the child's reactions to various levels of volume and pitch. The key to treating hearing impairments in children is the early detection of hearing loss. Training parents to work with deaf children and the early fitting of hearing aids is important in the development of communication skills
The lawyer by Francis D Murnaghan ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Our legal system is based on statute law passed by legislative bodies and common law based on precedents set by judges. Some lawyers are general practitioners while others specialize in areas such as tax law. It is recommended that students who wish to become lawyers get a well-rounded 4-year degree in a wide variety of subjects before going to law school
Da Vinci, man of science ( Visual )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Leonardo da Vinci first developed the odometer for measuring distance, the jack for lifting heavy objects, and the pile driver. He did not have modern power sources or advanced mathematics, but used his remarkable intuition and observation to make many scientific discoveries including: gears, cutting tools, lathes, bridge trusses, clocks, sawmills and hydraulics. Excerpts from the film Leonardo da Vinci from Pictura Films Corporation are shown, highlighting the many artistic and scientific developments from his notebooks including models of flying machines, catapults, cannons, guns, and tanks
 
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Languages
English (37)