WorldCat Identities

WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)

Overview
Works: 239 works in 260 publications in 1 language and 295 library holdings
Classifications: LB1609.S35, 507
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works about WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)
 
Most widely held works by WAAM (Television station : Baltimore, Md.)
Rh factor( Visual )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1939 the presence of the Rh factor was discovered to be in the blood of a large majority of human beings. This explains the some of the problems in pregancy and childbirth when a father is Rh positive and the mother is Rh negative, which can cause hemolytic disease of newborns
The peaceful atom( Visual )

3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program is the first in a three-part series on peacetime uses of atomic energy. A brief animated film reviews such concepts as neutrons and protons in a nucleus surrounded by electrons. There are 92 kinds of naturally occurring atoms, and changes can only be made to an atom by altering its nucleus. When the nucleus is split, it gives off energy. Mr. Strauss, the chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), cites President Eisenhower's 1953 "Atoms for Peace" speech to the United Nations in which he suggests a world pool of atomic materials for peaceful uses, such as commercial electrical power. Dr. Hafstad, Director of the Reactor Development Division of AEC, discusses the costs and problems of harnessing atomic power. He points out that although our coal and oil supplies are dwindling and uranium supplies are vast, the cost of generating power from the atom is currently prohibitive. However, he predicts that, within the next five to fifteen years, as nuclear power is developed, its costs will fall
Man will conquer space( Visual )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this third in a series of programs on space exploration, Dr. Wernher von Braun, rocket expert, explains and demonstrates a three-stage rocket and its role in the construction of a three-story space station, which will be a launch pad for trips to the moon. He shows viewers both a prototype space station model and moon rocket model and an animated version of the workings of the two
Man against cancer( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole offers a definition of cancer in this third program in the series. Dr. Samuel P. Asper, Jr. describes the thyroid gland and the characteristics of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. William S. Halsted's operation is still used for surgery on the thyroid to remove a goiter or cancer, and both the incision and the gland are shown in photos. A recovered surgery patient, operated on by H. William Scott of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is shown on film. Radiation of the thyroid and radioactive iodine taken internally are considered treatments rather than cures. Additional films show Dr. George O. Gey's cancer cell labs at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Frederik B. Bang using the electron microscope to detect cervical cancer, and the U.S. Public Health Service's National Cancer Institute's use of mice in cancer research and treatment. Dr. Isaac Berenblum's book, "Man Against Cancer," the basis of this series, is promoted. Mr. Poole reminds the audience once again, early detection is the key to a cure
Life in a drop of water( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole explains that "microscope" is from the two Greek words "mikros," small, and "skopos," a watcher. He notes that Dutch Antony Van Leeuwenhoek and English Robert Hooke were both instrumental in the development of the instrument and that Charles A. Spencer was America's first microscope maker. Dr. Schwartz, using the RCA Vidicon (a microscope connected to a television monitor), shows slides of water specimens from ponds in New York and New Jersey. The organisms he identifies include one-celled blepharisma and stentor, which he compares to the multi-celled rotifer, the plant spirogyra, diatoms, and the beating heart of a daphnia or water flea. Dr. Schwartz also shows a replica of Van Leeuwenhoek's microscope and his drawings of bacteria, and he demonstrates how to make a slide for viewing
The fight against polio( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The program begins with a tour of the Children's Hospital School of Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Raymond Lenhard describes the symptoms of poliomyelitis, or infantile paralysis, and treatment of the disease. In the exercise room, a physical therapist demonstrates the muscle test for fingers and shoulders and how patients progress from simple to complex exercises. Patients are shown in crutches and leg braces, in the rocking bed, and in the treatment pool doing underwater exercises. "Iron lung" respirators are demonstrated and explained. Lynn Poole interviews two patients who recovered from polio, and he alludes to research being done in polio immunization
Science coast to coast( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on the scientific achievements of four U.S. universities. At Indiana University, Vaclav Hlavaty solved the differential equations of unified gravitational and electromagnetic field thus providing proof for Einstein's unified field theory. Erwin Schrodinger and Karl Schwarzschild, pioneers in this research, are also discussed. From the New York University, Dr. Serge A. Korff directed a study of the effects of cosmic radiation from a high altitude observatory built on Mt. Wrangell in Alaska. His plane pilot was Dr. Terris Moore, president of the University of Alaska. University of Pittsburgh's Dr. Buchsbaum, professor of zoology, worked with colleagues to research how cells bathed in a nutrient fluid react to drugs and disease. A film shows these cell reactions under a phase-contrast microscope. Under the direction of Henry J. Gomberg, William Kerr, assistant director of the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project and assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan are investigating peaceful uses of atomic energy. They have developed a beta ray microscope that uses radioactive isotopes as tracers in specimens under microscopic investigation. This allows them to see how atoms are distributed in alloys and tracing the path of carbon in plants
The usefulness of useless knowledge( Visual )

2 editions published between 1952 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This television show examines the basic research associated with a university. When research is in its initial stages, the information generated does not appear to have any useful application. By using case studies, the show demonstrates that basic research can have profound implications. The show begins with a discussion with Dr. Abel Wolman on the definition of a university and the university's role in the search for truth. Dr. Wolman provides some examples of how seemingly insignificant research can lead to important discoveries
Highlights in review( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Host Lynn Poole reviews highlights of programs from the past year: "Freezing the Atom" (10/10/50) shows how atoms are slowed down and the development of the bolometer; "Electronics at Work in a Vacuum"(10/25/50) describes the development of the vacuum tube and the principles behind it, using puffed wheat in a jar as an example; "Your Questions About Science" (12/26/50) explains and demonstrates atomic chain reaction or nuclear fission using mouse traps and sugar cubes; "The Unbreakable Laws of the Universe" (1/2/51) explains the physical laws governing all things: inertia, action and equal reaction, conservation of motion, gravity, and atmospheric pressure; "Fight Against Polio" (1/16/51) filmed at the Children's Hospital in Baltimore, MD, shows how polio victims are being strengthened and restored to a normal life; "Don't Take Your Heart for Granted" (2/13/51) describes what the heart is, what can happen to it, and how to take care of it; "Archaeology: Key to the Past" (3/13/51) looks at the work of archaeologists and their study of the lost civilization of the Etruscans; "Cancer Will Be Conquered" (4/10/51) features Dr. Gey describing the differences between normal and cancerous cells and showing a magnified, live view of the separation of normal and abnormal human cells; "Is There Science in Art?" (2/27/51) reveals the science of cleaning varnish and dirt from old paintings at the Walters Art Gallery and the art of using x-rays and ultraviolet light to restore old paintings to their original intent. Poole also thanks the studio staff and mentions other favorite programs: "Fear" (103/50), "X-Ray, the Super Sleuth" (12/5/50), "Stream Pollution" (5/1/51), "Don't Drink That Water" (3/20/51), "Schistosomiasis" (11/21/50), and "Magnificent Microscope" (5/15/51)
Don't drink that water( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Telegrams from educators and scholars mark the third anniversary of the Johns Hopkins Science Review. Dr. Abel Wolman summarizes the history of methods of acquiring pure water and the science of sanitary engineering. Chlorine was discovered to be a reliable and practical chemical to use to kill water-borne bacteria. Dr. Wolman also shows a film of microscopic organisms and silt in water and discusses the decline of typhoid fever. Dr. Wolman and his colleagues use both animated films and models of a water filtration plant and a sewage treatment plant to explain the water purification processes
The librarian( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, Maryland is shown as a good example of a large urban public library system. Acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and reference functions are discussed as librarians and other library staff help patrons. James Dickson, a librarian at the Pratt Library, says that libraries contain much more than books as he shows maps, films, records and other materials. He talks about his educational background and what led him into librarianship. A good general college education followed by a masters degree in library science is needed to beome a librarian
Is X-ray harmful?( Visual )

2 editions published between 1957 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This video is primarily a discussion about the use of X-rays and questions about their safety. The video opens with a patient drinking and being observed through a fluoroscope. The second scene shows a patient being brought to the hospital in an ambulance and then being taken to the X-ray department. Mr. Poole discusses the biological effects of radiation exposure from three different aspects: nuclear fall-out, radioactive waste, and X-rays. He introduces Russell H. Morgan, chief, Department of Radiology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Morgan then answers questions posed by three newspapermen, Nate Hasseltine of the Washington Post, Pare Larintz, a movie producer, and Mr. Bell, a reporter from the New York Herald Tribune. The topics discussed include the biological ramifications of different forms of radiation, the radiation effects on aging, and the use of X-rays in the detection and treatment of disease
The archaeologist( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole describes what archaeologists do and why. Dr. William F. Albright explains how to determine the age of an object by datable style and carbon-14 testing. He then shows slides and diagrams of the Hajar bin Humeid mounds in south Arabia. As authenticator of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Dr. Albright discusses authentication methods for writings and scripts, such as comparing changes in the Hebrew alphabet and dated documents of the same period. Lastly, he describes qualities required for becoming an archaeologist
Industrial hygiene( Visual )

2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lynn Poole discusses the work of an industrial hygienist and notes that although there are many aspects of industrial hygiene, this program focuses on atmospheric contamination and its remediation. Dr. Anna M. Baetjer describes dusts (especially silica dust) and solvents (especially carbon tetrachloride) and the research being done to determine their effect on human workers. Charles E. Couchman, a Baltimore city industrial hygienist, demonstrates how carbon monoxide testing can be done with an instrument. Hopcalyte, developed at Johns Hopkins University and University of California, is used to reduce carbon monoxide levels. Allen D. Brandt, an engineer for Bethlehem Steel, shows photographs of exhaust systems at local industries and the collection and removal of particulate matter
Is it true?( Visual )

2 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program consists of experiments to prove the facts of science and disprove the myths. For example, a copper penny is not a good substitute for an electrical fuse because the fuse is insurance against an overload, and a penny will overheat the wires and cause a fire. Dr. Richard Lazarus points out that not all psychiatrists diagnose and treat mental illness and abnormal behavior. He explains the difference between a psychiatrist and a psychologist and the various interests in the latter's field, such as market research, human engineering, learning styles, and stress reactions. Other misconceptions this program seeks to dispel are that small flies are "baby" flies (they're all in the adult stage); that spontaneous generation occurs, as believed by Hermann von Helmholtz in the 19th century; that people can be hypnotized against their will; that frozen body parts should be rubbed with snow; that ice always keeps things cold; that water can put out any fire; and other superstitions mentioned briefly
The science of toys( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In a dramatization of a child's visit to a toy store, Mr. Poole and the storekeeper explain how certain toys work. For example, wind-up cars exhibit potential energy while other cars rely on friction or inertia. The angular momentum of the gyroscope toy is the same principle used in ships and airplanes. The dunking bird toy functions because of the methyl chloride within. Electric trains and steam engines are explained in relation to Sir Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion. Musical toys, kaleidoscopes, Slinkies, and toy helicopters all have a scientific basis
Courtroom doctor( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The topic of this program is the use of forensic medicine in scientific crime detection. A film shows Dr. Russell S. Fisher, lecturer in forensic medicine at Johns Hopkins University and chief medical examiner for the state of Maryland, at work in his lab. He is assisted by a team consisting of a secretary, chemists, a photographic specialist, doctors, police, and specialists in the physical sciences. In dealing with crimes of violence or mysterious death, Dr. Fisher asks: Who is the victim? Is it murder or suicide? When did it happen? How did it happen? Who did it? He shows a photo of a charred body and explains when and how the death occurred and the importance of an autopsy and a post-mortem examination. Dr. Fisher compares blood samples and explains how they are used by a courtroom doctor to exonerate or convict the accused. Using sketches from Lynn Poole's book "Science, the Super Sleuth," Dr. Fisher describes what he looks for in knifing murders. He also tells the case of the arsenic in the pancake flour and demonstrates how the presence of arsenic was confirmed. Lynn Poole shows snapshots of Dr. Fisher as a student in the toxicology lab at Georgia Tech as well as photos from throughout his career in forensic medicine. Dr. Fisher says that this career is different and challenging every day and that there are many opportunities for medical examiners and other trained specialists, with salaries from $17,000-20,000
Epidemic theory Ct+1=St (1-qct), what is it?( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using diagrams, Dr. Lowell J. Reed first describes the history of epidemics, the origins of disease, using measles and small pox as examples, and means of transmission. He then demonstrates the epidemic theory where St is the number of people susceptible to the disease over time multipled by 1 minus qct (the probability of a person with the disease meeting a susceptible person) equals C t+1(cases over time). Also factored into this equation is the number of people who develop an immunity to the disease after recovering from it. The theory is then tested against experience. Dr. Reed sets up an experiment demonstrating the practical application of the theory using a model. He then discusses epidemic control focusing on isolation of people who already have the disease, and immuniztion of people who are susceptible to the disease
News from the sky( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explorations of the upper atmosphere are made through telemetering or the measuring of remote objects from afar. Rockets take these measuring devices into the upper atmosphere to measure cosmic ray intensity, fuel consumption, oil pressure, air speed, altitude, and the magnitude of the earth's magnetic field. Receivers on earth will retrieve the measurements transmitted from space through a radio link. Current uses of this information aid in the development of guided missiles
Beginnings of history( Visual )

2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this unhosted program, the second part of a film by the British Information Service continues the discussion of prehistoric civilizations in the United Kingdom with the bronze age. The iron age in Britain began around 3,000 years ago when the Celts invaded the British Isles. They brought with them the first wheeled vehicles. Remains of an ancient city and a recreation of a farmstead from this are shown
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.44 (from 0.10 for Rh factor ... to 0.82 for Don't drin ...)

Languages
English (42)