WorldCat Identities

White, Conrad

Overview
Works: 72 works in 87 publications in 1 language and 5,007 library holdings
Genres: Documentary television programs  History 
Roles: Director, Author, Editor, Photographer, Illustrator, Creator
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Conrad White
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 105 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on school desegregation and obtaining a quality of education for minorities in Boston. Program consists of a variety of segments, including excerpts of statements made by the Say Brother 'All Stars,' a mime performance by Fred Johnson (Halim Adbur Rashid), an interview with Boston students conducted by Marita Rivero, excerpts from interviews with Pat Bonner Lyons (Community Task Force on Education) and Ellen Swepson Jackson (Director of the Freedom House Institute in Schools and Education), a group discussion on education with Gloria Joyner, Myrtle Adams (both from the Community Task Force on Education), Rev. Scott Campbell (with Racial Harmony Now), Alice Yancey (Homeward School Association), and George Cox (Black Educators' Alliance of Massachusetts), 'Information' on bankruptcy laws and citizen's rights regarding utility companies, an excerpt from a Say Brother interview with Bill Cosby, the 'Community Calendar,' and 'Commentary' by Producer Marita Rivero. All program segments were filmed on location at Jeremiah E. Burke High School, Dorchester
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on the representation of women in African art. Host Marita Rivero Rivero speaks with Barry Gaither, Director and Curator of the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists and Special Consultant to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, to discuss portrayals of women in African art; the earliest images of women in Africa, the implied societal roles in African sculpture, the reasons for certain portrayals in art, the religious utilization of art, the conservative nature of 'traditional' art, and the African art collection at the National Center of Afro-American Artists. Additional segments include the 'Community Calendar' and a segment narrated by Dighton Spooner on the permanent exhibit of African art at the Bates Gallery at Harvard's Peabody Museum
Say brother. how black journalists watch Boston( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program is the first of two focusing on African American media and its function in the community. Host Barbara Barrow speaks with Ron Hutson (head of the Urban 'Team' at the Boston Globe), Mel Miller (publisher of the Bay State Banner), and Sarah-Ann Shaw (reporter for WBZ News and host of the television program Mzizi Roots) about the definition of news, if there is a difference between white news and Black news and how they are covered, if the white media's 'commitment' to objectivity affects the coverage of African American news stories, if white reporters and Black reporters bring back different news stories, and the resources needed to cover African American community issues. Additional segments include the 'Say Brother News' with reporters Leah Fletcher, Eric Sampedro, Justina Chu, and WNAC TV arts critic Tanya Hart, and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program ties together several events related to Muhammad Ali's trip to Boston to participate in a benefit boxing exhibition for the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts. Segments include excerpts from a press conference held by Elma Lewis (Director of the Elma Lewis School of Fine Arts) and Ali for African American journalists, an interview with Ali conducted by Barbara Barrow, excerpts from Ali's exhibition bouts with Peter Fuller, Walter Haines, and Ronnie Drinkwater, an interview with Ronnie Drinkwater (conducted by Charlie Stuart in Club 44) before Drinkwater's bout with Ali, and an excerpt from Ali's speech at the 1975 Nation of Islam's Savior's Day celebration in Chicago. Program serves to illustrate the reputation of the school
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program provides legal advice from two Boston-based lawyers. Attorneys Rudy Pierce and A.D. Saunders discuss two areas of legal importance: the procedural rights of the accused and the acquisition of property. Areas of discussion include whether a police officer stop you and frisk you, the reasons why an officer would conduct a warrantless search, laws related to the search of a car or apartment, what a person should keep in mind if he or she is arrested, what Miranda rights are, what a person accused of a crime should do once they have a lawyer, what a person who is considering buying a home should think about, when should you find an attorney when buying a house, what you should expect from an attorney when purchasing property, if a person can buy a house without an attorney, and what problems a person would need protection when purchasing a house. Additional segments include 'Access' (which describes the services of Greater Boston Legal Services, Inc.), 'Information' (on the Legal Fee Arbitration Board of the Massachusetts Bar Association), a listing of legal aid societies, and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Host Barbara Barrow speaks with May Ling Tong, Director of the Chinese American Civic Association in Boston, about the history of Chinese people in Boston and the 'myths' held by non-Chinese Americans about the mental health and social service needs of the Chinese community. Additional segments include the 'Say Brother News' with Eric Sampedro and Leah Fletcher, the 'Third World Connection' (about the genealogical connection between the Africans and Chinese), a film review of Pipe Dreams by arts critic Tanya Hart, and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on three community organizations working to improve the quality of African American life in Boston. Host Topper Carew conducts a discussion with Dinizulu Ceitou (member of the African Liberation Day Support Committee, a committee that not only focuses on the National African Liberation Day demonstration, but also works to organize local demonstrations and community forums), Leo Fletcher (member of the United Community Construction Workers, organized in 1968 to combat racism in the construction community and open the job market for African American men and women in construction), and Lennie Durant (member of Coalition for a Clean Community, organized to ensure that the quality of city services - garbage removal, street cleaning, street repair, et cetera - in African American communities equals that of white communities). Carew discusses with each the origins of their organizations, their function in the community and the goals each group has for itself, its members, and the communities they serve. Carew touches upon their role in the overall struggle of African Americans for equity and liberation
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program analyzes why African American candidates were unable to win appointment to either Boston's School Committee or City Council in the 1975 elections. Guest host James Rowe of WILD Radio News speaks with Clarence Dilday (attorney and unsuccessful candidate for City Council), John O'Bryant (Director of the Dimock Community Health Center and unsuccessful candidate for School Committee), Richard Taylor (John O'Bryant's campaign manager), and Luix Overbea (reporter for the Christian Science Monitor) about why African Americans in Boston were unable to elect Dilday and O'Bryant, what the election says about the African American community's commitment to getting people in office, if election results would have been better if it had been an 'off' year election, if an organization for raising funds to support African American candidates is in the making, and what African Americans can do to heighten their political sophistication. Additional segments include a survey of Boston's voting statistics for 1969, 1971 and 1975, an interview conducted by writer/researcher Dighton Spooner with Dr. Ronald Walters (Associate Professor of Political Science at Howard University) about African Americans and the 1976 presidential election, 'Information' on registering to vote, 'Access' (on the Roxbury-Dorchester JCs), and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on historical materials that illustrate the systematic degradation of African Americans in the United States. Host Barbara Barrow talks to Brenda Verner, a historian and media specialist who offers a socio-historical analysis of print materials (such as greeting cards and trade cards) dating from the post-Civil War period as a starting point for identifying the origins of racist attitudes and myths related to the African American community. The program features slides of relevant trade cards and early 20th century black and white photographs that dispute those cards' content
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Program focuses on African American-owned businesses in the Boston area. Host Thomas Hardy speaks with Elbert Bishop, Director of the South West Corridor Land Development Coalition, and Charles Calvey, owner of Calvey's Jewelers and President of the Dudley Terminal Merchants Association, about what is good about the Roxbury-Dudley Terminal and Dorchester business community and economy, what will be happening in terms of the positive impact of the economy in those areas, what ways are there for African American-owned businesses to move into and participate in the local community, how much money is coming into the Dudley area for the Southwest Corridor Project, how the push for capitalist endeavors affect the African American community, and what kind of governmental supports there are for African American businesses. Additional segments include a 'Black Women in Business' interview with Bunny Jackson, conducted by Producer Marita Rivero
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Host Barbara Barrow discusses the lack of communication between educators and students in the Boston school district, with community members Gregory Spence (an attorney for the City of Boston), Kenya Clemens (of the Youth Activities Commission), Jeannette Bolt (playwright and author of A Minority Child's Day), and Dr. Alvin Pouissant (noted psychiatrist and Harvard professor). Issues addressed include the different social backgrounds of educators and students, Black English in the classroom, the role of standardized achievement tests in student evaluations, and the need for more humanity in the classroom. Also included in the program are 'man on the street' interviews conducted by Associate Producer Vickie Jones (in which she asks people their opinion of African American schools with white educators and whether or not Black children should be taught by Black teachers), an interview with Barbara Sizemore conducted by Jon Brim (on the problems of the Washington, DC school system and Sizemore's experiences as a former Superintendent of Schools there), an excerpt from a filmed performance of Bolt's play A Minority Child's Day; and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Program examines a number of health issues prevalent in the the African American community and provides contact information for health-related resources. Host Topper Carew, narrating over still photography, introduces interview segments with Say Brother writer/researcher Dighton Spooner and Dr. Houston Kelly (on hypertension and the diet of the Black community), Dr. Louis Sullivan of the Boston Sickle Cell Center (on the physical and political implications of sickle cell anemia), Howard Hughes, Director of the Dimock Community Health Center's alcoholism program (on recognizing and treating alcohol problems), Dr. Edward Hurwitz (on foot care), and Dr. Ronald Weston (on dental care and early prevention). Carew, alone, narrates informational segments on lead paint poisoning, mental health, and drug abuse, over still photography
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program explores the impact of the modified desegregation plan that went into effect in Boston, Massachusetts, in May, 1976. Host Barbara Barrow visits the students and faculty of the William Monroe Trotter School in Roxbury's District 9 to explore the intent of Judge Garrity's altered desegregation plan via conversations with Lillian Wood (a learning center coordinator for the Trotter School), Dennis DeCoste (teacher at the Trotter School), and students. Topics include the enforcement of racial diversity, how the school curriculum has changed with the implementation of the plan, and how students and teachers feel about their new learning workspaces. At the time of the program, the Trotter School had an excellent reputation as a magnet school. Additional program segments include a previously aired in-studio performance from the musical 'Raisin' (with Darren Green singing 'Sidewalk Tree') and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on the meaning and celebration of Kwanzaa, the African celebration of first fruits. Segments include "man on the street" interviews conducted by two middle school students (who ask shoppers if they know what Kwanzaa is), in-studio performances by the St. Joseph's Community School Junior and Senior Choirs, a Kwanzaa question-and-answer session with Brother Imara, an in-studio Kwanzaa ceremony; and performances of the folktales 'Thunder and Lightning' and 'Why God Lives in the Sky' by storyteller Brother Blue (Dr. Hugh Morgan Hill)
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on the work of Paige Academy, a private school in Roxbury for children aged three months to seven years. Hosts Barbara Barrow and Melvin Moore speak with Paige Academy Founder and Director Angela Paige Cook and the Academy's Administrative Producer, Mary Ann Crayton, to discuss the school's origins and practices, such as teaching by the nguzo saba (the seven principles of Kwanza). Program includes slides of Academy students
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The program focuses on Gretchen Wortham's recent appointment to Station Manager of WILD Radio, Boston. Host Barbara Barrow and Wortham discuss the personal and professional events that led to her appointment, equal employment and FCC regulations, listener/viewer feedback, women in the workplace, African American radio programming, advertising, and other issues related to WILD. Additional segments include the 'Say Brother News' with anchors Eric Sampedro and Leah Fletcher, an excerpt from a film on early indigenous peoples in North America, and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program explores the effect of television violence on children via a joint discussion between host Melvin Moore (a psychologist) and two professors currently collaborating on a project to study the ability of children to evaluate television program content: Dr. Aimee D. Leifer (Associate Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education) and Dr. Sheryl B. Graves (Professor of Psychology at New York University). Topics include why we still see a great deal of violence on television, in what ways television violence is different from 'real-life' violence, what can kids learn from watching violent programs, if violence watched translates to 'real life,' if there are racial differences that children learn on television, if there are differences between what boys and girls learn, and if we should try to program television in any particular way
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program focuses on minority cultural institutions and whether they are destined to fail in the United States. Host Barbara Barrow speaks with Elma Lewis, Director of the National Center of Afro-American Artists about the limited existence of minority cultural institutions, what institutions serve Blacks in America, if the National Center is a stable institution, the role of donations and individual giving in the economic viability of an institution, and the difficulty in getting grants (due to the fact, as Lewis states, grant monies are distributed to perpetuate a culture rather than develop marginalized populations). Additional segments include the 'Say Brother News' with reporters Leah Fletcher, Eric Sampedro, Justina Chu, and WNAC TV arts critic Tanya Hart, the 'Third World Connection' (in which the mixture of African, Chinese, and Eastern Europe people is discussed), and the 'Community Calendar.'
Say brother. how black journalists watch Boston( Visual )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This program is the second of two focusing on Black media and its function in the community. Host Barbara Barrow speaks with Ron Hutson (head of the Urban 'Team' at the Boston Globe), Mel Miller (publisher of the Bay State Banner), and Sarah-Ann Shaw (reporter for WBZ News and host of the television program Mzizi Roots) about how people get their news, differences between reading newspapers and watching the news on television, and what the media should be doing to serve an educational purpose. Additional segments include the 'Say Brother News' with reporters Leah Fletcher, Eric Sampedro, Justina Chu, and WNAC TV arts critic Tanya Hart, 'man on the street' interviews with Boston residents regarding the function of the media, and the 'Third World Connection' (in which the blending of Spanish, Caucasian, and African ethnicities in Brazil and the West Indies is discussed)
Say brother( Visual )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The program examines the history of Black fraternal organizations and their impact on African-American life in America -- in particular Black Masonic lodges and Greek letter organizations. Host Carmen Fields introduces the history of Black fraternal organizations in the United States, and conducts two distinct interviews: one with Arthur Frederick, a 32nd degree mason and author of Negro Masonry in the United States; the other with Mary Stuart Spence, Media Co-chairman for the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Boston Alumnus Chapter, and Edward R. Redd, President of Omega Chi Phi, Iota Eta Pi Chapter, Boston. Conversational emphasis is on the social needs fraternal that organizations fulfill, as well as their service to the community. Program includes a clip of the film Countdown at Kusini, a film Delta Sigma Theta Sorority helped finance
 
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Languages
English (20)