WorldCat Identities

Franklin, Rosalind 1920-1958

Overview
Works: 84 works in 164 publications in 2 languages and 8,489 library holdings
Genres: Biography  History  Biographies  Folklore  Juvenile works  Fiction  Nonfiction television programs  Television specials 
Roles: Author, Dedicatee
Classifications: QP26.F68, 572.8092
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Rosalind Franklin
 
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Most widely held works by Rosalind Franklin
Baby lore : superstitions & old wives tales from the world over related to pregnancy, birth & babycare by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

2 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When the nightingale sang : a nurse's life in the 1950s and 1960s by Cynthia O'Neill( Book )

3 editions published between 2004 and 2006 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The superstitious bride : a book of wedding lore by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

2 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Clemo the Cornish cat by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The bride's book of wedding superstitions by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Double helix 50th anniversary collection : the molecular structure of nucleic acids : the classic papers from Nature, 25 April 1953 by Nature( Book )

3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Molecular structure of nucleic acids : a structure for deoxyribonucleic acid by James D Watson( Book )

1 edition published in 1953 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Places of everyday generosity : the philanthropy of Newfoundlanders in Fort McMurray by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

2 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rosalind Franklin : the dark lady of DNA by Brenda Maddox( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In March 1953, Maurice Wilkins of King's College, London, announced the departure of his obstructive colleague Rosalind Franklin to rival Cavendish Laboratory scientist Francis Crick. But it was too late. Franklin's unpublished data and crucial photograph of DNA had already been seen by her competitors at the Cambridge University lab. With the aid of these, plus their own knowledge, Watson and Crick discovered the structure of the molecule that genes are composed of--DNA, the secret of life. This is a powerful story of a remarkable simpleminded, forthright and tempestuous young woman who, at the age of fifteen, decided she was going to be a scientist, but who was airbrushed out of the greatest scientific discovery of the twentieth century
Bodrick and the magic petals : the Beast of Bodmin Moor meets the Cornish piskies! by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Papers of Charlotte Friend, PhD by Charlotte Friend( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Charlotte Friend collection provides an excellent view of the scientist as well as the non-research side of a researcher's career. These files document Dr. Friend's role as a professional involved with numerous organizations as a leader, committee member, and reviewer; as an administrator of her own lab, with the concomitant need to write and receive grants from outside funding; and, at a lessening degree as time went on, as a teacher. Dr. Friend's research efforts are harder to trace here. The natural source for this would be the research notebooks, but these are now lost, with only a few remaining in the Center for Experimental Cell Biology. In this collection, the Manuscripts Series has the finished product of this research, although this series ends in 1979. There is also the Meetings, Speeches and Notebooks Series, which shows somewhat the progress of her work. Scattered throughout the Correspondence and Alphabetical series are also fleeting references to her work. Another facet of the collection is the insight it provides into the world of cancer research during an important era, an era which Dr. Friend herself helped propel. This was the time, starting in the 1950s, when scientists gradually turned to an acceptance of viruses as cancer causing agents in humans. The evolution of the field may be traced through the conference programs (Box 33-38), the journal articles that Dr. Friend reviewed (Box 2, Box 7-19), as well as through the correspondence and her own research. These papers also show the intimacy of the cancer research community itself, at least at the level at which Dr. Friend operated. These papers provide information on women's role in science. Dr. Friend in some ways held an unusual position. Her discovery of the Friend leukemia virus established her reputation very early in her career. Perhaps because of this, she felt that she herself was not held back by being a woman, with the exception of some wage discrimination. Still, she believed that science truly had been a man's world and that it would take conscious and steady efforts by women to change this. For her part, this involved nominating women to positions of authority in organizations; suggesting women speakers for programs; speaking out about women's issues; serving as a role model to young women from grade school to graduate school; and ultimately, by taking time from her own lab to serve in prominent positions in professional associations. The latter is reflected in the Alphabetical Series in files on the Harvey Society, the American Association for Cancer Research, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. Finally, the Charlotte Friend Papers give a great deal of insight into her as a person. She cared deeply about and was very involved with her family (Personal Series). She loved to travel, but always loved New York. She wrote letters to congressmen and mayors on issues she cared about, including support for Israel, cuts in research funding, the status of women, and abortion rights (Box 42, f.7). Her support staff loved her, and many times she functioned as a mother hen to the group. Still, she seemed to be the mentor to few graduate students, and colleagues did not remain many years in her lab. She was a complex woman whose intricacies are clearly displayed in this collection
DNA 60 years on( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Upon the 60th anniversary of the discovery of DNA, Sir Robert Winston delves into the archive. In 1953, Francis Crick and James Watson published their single page article in 'Nature' magazine indicating that the structure of DNA was a double helix. Crick talks from the archive (from a cow shed) about the central premise of their research. Crick, a physicist, talks about his work at the tissue lab at Cambridge and the structure of proteins. This is where he met Watson. Watson, a biologist, also talks about his work. Crick says that they {u2018}educated each other{u2019}. They were working with Max Perutz. Perutz reminisces about the unpreposing appearance of Watson who was scruffy! Crick however, was more precise in manner. At King{u2019}s College London, Maurice Wilkins was working on the same problem on the structure of DNA (he{u2019}d been involved in the development of the atom bomb in the US). Rosalind Franklin and her expertise in crystallography turned out to be key in cracking the code. Her brother, now 90, talks about her professional drive. Unfortunately, there was a professional misunderstanding between Wilkins and Franklin which was caused by their superiors. Even though they were rivals, the teams in Cambridge and London shared information by visiting labs and attending lectures. Linus Pauling, who was based in the US, was not included in this friendly rivalry. The race to discover the structure of DNA intensified. Franklin left King{u2019}s and her research; Wilkins showed one of her crystal photographs to Crick which revealed that the DNA was helical in structure. She died of cancer at 37. Watson wrote an unflattering caricature of her in his biography; many comments have since been disproved and her reputation has grown in recognition of her contribution. Crick recounts how Watson was not skilled at model making; the repeatable nature of the molecules had been posited many years only. Crick tells how exhausting it was to make the final revelation; Crick went straight to bed. Perutz remembers seeing the model for the first time and his sense immediately that it was right. In 1953, the article in 'Nature' scarcely changed things. In 1962 Watson and Crick received the Nobel prize for their work; the scientific revolution was to come later. In 1966 the DNA {u2018}code{u2019} was cracked. In the 1980s, Watson comments on the ethical dilemma of understanding and knowing about our own DNA. A Panorama programme in 1988 discussed some of these ethical issues in particular regarding parents choosing certain {u2018}desirable{u2019} or {u2018}undesirable{u2019} characteristics for their children. The research is described as a {u2018}Pandora{u2019}s box{u2019} according to Sydney Brenner. Winston talks about sequencing the human genome, funded by Wellcome Trust. Sir Alec Jeffreys comment on DNA fingerprinting {u2013} a surprising and unexpected outcome of Crick and Watsons{u2019} research. Jeffreys talks about the first photograph of finger print DNA, which indicated {u2018}family{u2019} relationships. It was used to convict someone for the first time in 1987. A rapist was convicted as a result of a victim{u2019}s knowledge of the tv series CSI. More recently Winston provided DNA for his programme 'Threads of Life' and discovers his genetic heritage which harks back to a past in the Mediterranean with Jewish roots. Winston mentions the margins of error {u2013} DNA samples are only reliable if the samples are kept secure. In 2006, the debate raged about the database of DNA tested individuals, either victims or criminals. Henry Porter argues against the creep of data kept on individuals. The Protection of Freedoms Act was passed by government 2012. Innocent individuals{u2019} DNA is being deleted. A database of people with cancer was launched in the UK. In 2010 Craig Venter talks about his development of a synthetic self-replicating cell. Dr Carol Reedhead works in the UK and US on transgenics; at the moment studying mice. Watson, with some controversial views, is still working at the cutting age of biology; Winston talks to him over the phone about the legacy of the original discovery. He believes that cancer will be cured in the near future using this research
The structure of sodium thymonucleate fibers by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

1 edition published in 1955 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Molecular configuration in sodium thymonucleate by Rosalind Franklin( )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The code of life( Visual )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This programme brings together some of the historical footage held in the BBC which was originally broadcast on television or radio and features some of the luminaries who worked on the discovery of DNA and its applications. Many of the scientists speak candidly about their work and rivalries within the field. The BBC recorded Erwin Schrödinger in 1949 musing on biological matters (he was a physicist). He was a contemporary of Einstein (as illustrated by a photograph). Professors Lisa Jardine and Steve Jones, UCL, comment on his impact as a scientist and physicist. His book, 'What is Life?', was also influential in understanding the nature of heredity; noted by Sir Paul Nurse. Schrödinger was based in Dublin and worked at Trinity College; he applied his physics training on entrophy and coding to the big questions in biology such as the 'secret' of life. Both Darwin and Mendel were influential early scientists in this field but their work led to the eugenics movement (a clip from the Wellcome Library/Galton Institute title 'Heredity in Man' is shown). Physicists contemporary to Schrödinger engaged in war work; they worked on weapons research. Maurice Wilkins worked on the atomic bomb in the US; after the war he joined Kings College London working on crystallography. Simple sugars were known to be components of DNA but the relationship between them was not known. Post war, in Cambridge, another ex-weapons designer - Francis Crick - was working in molecular biology. Jardine knew Crick as a child; she recounts how Crick developed a mine which targeted mine-sweepers. James Watson, who received his Phd at 22 arrived at Cambridge and met his scientific collaboraror Crick. Francis and Odile Crick hosted wild parties at Cambridge, as remembered by Jardine. Rosalind Franklin was hired by Wilkins to 'sharpen up' the crystallography photos that the lab at King's had taken. Unfortunately, Franklin arrived at the lab and the working relationship between her and Wilkins was not good. Raymond Gosling was her research assistant and remembers the tension. Both Crick and Watson who were working on the same issue were considered to be 'butterflies' but it emerged that they were very well connected in terms of meeting other scientists in Cambridge - a chance meetng with John Griffiths gave Crick a breakthrough. They caught wind that Linus Pauling was working on the same problem in the US. Watson visited Wilkins in London and had a tense encounter with Franklin. During his meeting with Wilkins, Watson was inadvertantly shown some of the crystallographs and discovered that there were two different A form and B form crystallograph pictures and the second picture was clearly a helix to Watson's eyes. This led to the famous model and the 1953 paper. This was a critical moment in science, although it hardly featured in the public's imagination. The BBC commissioned a programme, 'The Prizewinners' in 1962 after Wilkins, Watson and Crick received the Nobel prize. Franklin never shared in the Nobel prize - she died of ovarian cancer in 1958. South African researcher, Sydney Brenner, came to the UK and worked on the 'coding problem'; how DNA replicated itself. He collaborated with Crick. Fred Sanger pioneered the method of sequencing DNA; he earned a Nobel prize for his work. John Sulston received a Nobel prize for cataloguing every cell in the nemotode; he sequenced every gene (his lack of materialism is amply illustrated by his shabby kitchen) . This became a proof of concept for reading the human genome. He reminisces about the famous 'Bermuda Talks' which scoped the Bermuda Principles. Craig Venter, from the US, broke from the 'gentlemanly' principles of Bermuda. Sulston acelerated the research in the UK so that Venter could not profit from the research and 'patent' any of the genes. Sulston appeared on 'Desert Island Discs' - he confesses to being a bit pleased with his success in achieving this
[Isaac Asimov talks about the double helix, DNA research] by Isaac Asimov( Recording )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Isaac Asimov, in a TV special entitled, "The race for the double helix," narrates the story of the discovery of the nature of the human genome and the race between the two research teams of James Watson and Francis Crick and of Rosalyn Franklin and Morris Wilkins. Asimov delves into their personalities and the personalities of Linus Pauling and others who affected the progress of the research
Nature : the molecular structure of nucleic acids : the classic papers from Nature, 25 April 1953( Book )

1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The structure of sodium thymonucleate fibers by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

1 edition published in 1953 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

[Rosalind Franklin offprints] by Rosalind Franklin( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Rosalind Franklin papers by Rosalind Franklin( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Rosalind Elsie Franklin (1920-1958) was a British chemist and crystallographer who is best known for her role in the discovery of the structure of DNA. It was her x-ray diffraction photos of DNA and her analysis of that data--provided to Francis Crick and James Watson without her knowledge--that gave them clues crucial to building their correct theoretical model of the molecule in 1953. While best known for this work, Franklin also did important research into the micro-structure and properties of coals and other carbons, and spent the last five years of her career elucidating the structure of plant viruses, notably tobacco mosaic virus. The Churchill Archives Centre in Cambridge, England is the repository for the Rosalind Franklin Papers, which range from 1920 to 1975. The collection contains photographs, correspondence, diaries, published articles, lectures, laboratory notebooks, and research notes. As part of its Profiles in Science project, the National Library of Medicine has collaborated with the Churchill Archives Centre to digitize and make available over the World Wide Web a selection of the Rosalind Franklin Papers for use by educators and researchers. This site provides access to the portions of the Rosalind Franklin Papers of the Churchill Archives Centre that have been selected for digitization. Individuals interested in conducting research in the Rosalind Franklin Papers are invited to contact the Churchill Archives Centre. This online Exhibit is designed to introduce you to the various phases of Franklin's scientific career and professional life
 
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Baby lore : superstitions & old wives tales from the world over related to pregnancy, birth & babycare
Alternative Names
Franklin, Rosalind 1920-1958

Franklin, Rosalind E. 1920-1958

Franklin, Rosalind Elsie

Franklin, Rosalind Elsie 1920-1958

Franklin Rozalind

Rosalind Elsie Franklin biologiste moléculaire britannique

Rosalind Franklin biofisica britannica

Rosalind Franklin biofísica y cristalógrafa inglesa

Rosalind Franklin biofizician

Rosalind Franklin britische Biochemikerin

Rosalind Franklin British chemist, biophysicist, and X-ray crystallographer

Rosalind Franklin britisk kjemiker

Rosalind Franklin Brits natuurkundige

Rosalind Franklin brytyjska uczona, biolog i genetyk

Rosalind Franklin Inlatirra jacha marka yatxatawiri

Rosalind Franklin Inlatirra mama llaqtayuq hamut'ayuq

Rosalind Franklin Kimiste, Biofizikante dhe Kristalografe e rrezeve X

Rosalind Franklinová

Rozalind Franklin

Rozalind Frenklin

Rozalinda Franklina

Ρόζαλιντ Φράνκλιν

Ρόζαλιντ Φράνκλιν Βρετανίδα χημικός, βιοφυσικός, και κρυσταλογράφος ακτίνων Χ

Разалінд Франклін

Розалинд Франклин

Розалінда Франклін

Ռոզալինդ Ֆրանկլին

פראנקלין, רוזלינד אלזי 1920-1958

פרנקלין, רוזלינד אלזי 1920-1958

פרענקלין, רוזלינד אלזי 1920-1958

רוזלינד פרנקלין

روزاليند فرانكلين

روزالیند فرانکلین

रोजालिन् फ्रेन्क्लिन

रॉसलिंड एल्सी फ्रेंकलिन

রোজালিন্ড ফ্রাঙ্কলিন

ਰੋਜ਼ਾਲਿੰਡ ਫ੍ਰੈਂਕਲਿਨ

உரோசலிண்டு பிராங்குளின்

ರೋಸಾಲಿಂಡ್ ಫ್ರಾಂಕ್ಲಿನ್

റോസാലിന്റ് ഫ്രാങ്ക്ലിൻ

රොසලින්ඩ් ෆ්‍රෑන්ක්ලීන්

โรซาลินด์ แฟรงคลิน

როზალინდ ფრანკლინი

로절린드 프랭클린

フランクリン, ロザリンド

ロザリンド・フランクリン

羅莎琳·富蘭克林

羅薩蓮德·富蘭克林

Languages
English (115)

Chinese (1)

Covers
When the nightingale sang : a nurse's life in the 1950s and 1960sThe superstitious bride : a book of wedding loreClemo the Cornish catThe bride's book of wedding superstitionsRosalind Franklin : the dark lady of DNABodrick and the magic petals : the Beast of Bodmin Moor meets the Cornish piskies!Rosalind Franklin and DNA