WorldCat Identities

Konishi, Mark

Overview
Works: 37 works in 58 publications in 2 languages and 3,245 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Editor, Thesis advisor
Classifications: QL776, 591.59
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Mark Konishi
The design of animal communication( Book )

13 editions published between 1999 and 2003 in English and held by 357 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"When animals, including humans, communicate, they convey information and express their perceptions of the world. Because different organisms are able to produce and perceive different signals, the animal world contains a diversity of communication systems. Based on the approach laid out in the 1950s by Nobel laureate Nikolaas Tinbergen, this book looks at animal communication from the four perspectives of mechanisms, ontogeny, function, and phylogeny."--BOOK JACKET. "The book's great strength is its broad comparative perspective, which enables the reader to appreciate the diversity of solutions to particular problems of signal design and perception."--Jacket
Colloquium on Auditory Neuroscience : development, transduction, and integration by Transduction, and Integration Colloquium on Auditory Neuroscience: Development( Book )

6 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kotori wa naze utau no ka by Masakazu Konishi( Book )

2 editions published in 1994 in Japanese and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The role of audition in the development and maintenance of avian vocal behavior by Masakazu Konishi( )

3 editions published in 1963 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Neural dynamics underlying complex behavior in a songbird by Anthony Leonardo( Book )

1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Spike-timing dependent plasticity and synchronous oscillations in an invertebrate olfactory system by Stijn Cassenaer( )

2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Papers from the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Auditory Neuroscience : Development, Transduction, and Integration by Transduction, and Integration Colloquium on Auditory Neuroscience: Development( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Population coding and reconstruction of complex stimuli in the locust olfactory system by Bede Michael Broome( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Neural oscillations and the decoding of sensory information by Javier Perez-Orive( Book )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The development of connectivity and the nature of synaptic transmission between avian song control nuclei by Richard Daniel Mooney( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Integration of parallel processing streams in the inferior colliculus of the barn owl by James Allan Mazer( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Processing of interaural level differences in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl by Ralph Adolphs( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Orienting and preference : an enquiry into the mechanisms underlying human decision making by Claudiu Simion( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Coding of auditory space by Masakazu Konishi( )

1 edition published in 2003 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Behavioral, anatomical, and physiological approaches can be integrated in the study of sound localization in barn owls. Space representation in owls provides a useful example for discussion of place and ensemble coding. Selectivity for space is broad and ambiguous in low-order neurons. Parallel pathways for binaural cues and for different frequency bands converge on high-order space-specific neurons, which encode space more precisely. An ensemble of broadly tuned place-coding neurons may converge on a single high-order neuron to create an improved labeled line. Thus, the two coding schemes are not alternate methods. Owls can localize sounds by using either the isomorphic map of auditory space in the midbrain or forebrain neural networks in which space is not mapped
Deciphering the brain's codes by Masakazu Konishi( )

1 edition published in 1991 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The two sensory systems discussed use similar algorithms for the synthesis of the neuronal selectivity for the stimulus that releases a particular behavior, although the neural circuits, the brain sites involved, and even the species are different. This stimulus selectivity emerges gradually in a neural network organized according to parallel and hierarchical design principles. The parallel channels contain lower order stations with special circuits for the creation of neuronal selectivities for different features of the stimulus. Convergence of the parallel pathways brings these selectivities together at a higher order station for the eventual synthesis of the selectivity for the whole stimulus pattern. The neurons that are selective for the stimulus are at the top of the hierarchy, and they form the interface between the sensory and motor systems or between sensory systems of different modalities. The similarities of these two systems at the level of algorithms suggest the existence of rules of signal processing that transcend different sensory systems and species of animals
Characterization of the auditory thalamic nucleus of the barn owl by Larry Proctor( Book )

1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A critical period for estrogen action on neurons of the song control system in the zebra finch by Masakazu Konishi( )

1 edition published in 1988 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The song nuclei of the male zebra finch (Poephila guttata) contain larger neurons than those of the female. This gender difference arises after hatching as a result of cell atrophy in the female and cell growth in the male. Implantation of estrogen in female chicks induces masculine differentiation of neurons in their song nuclei. The effects of estrogen on neuron size decline steeply after posthatching day 35 when neuronal atrophy begins. Estrogen loses its masculinizing effects completely after day 45 when the adult level of neuronal atrophy is reached. Thus, the end and the intensity of hormone action appear to be correlated with the timing of neuronal atrophy
Growth and atrophy of neurons labeled at their birth in a song nucleus of the zebra finch by Masakazu Konishi( )

1 edition published in 1990 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The robust nucleus of the archistriatum (RA) is one of the forebrain nuclei that control song production in birds. In the zebra finch (Poephila guttata), this nucleus contains more and larger neurons in the male than in the female. A single injection of tritiated thymidine into the egg on the 6th or 7th day of incubation resulted in labeling of many RA neurons with tritium. The size of tritium-labeled neurons and the tissue volume containing them did not differ between the sexes at 15 days after hatching. In the adult brain, tritium-labeled neurons and the tissue volume containing them were much larger in the male than in the female. Also, tritium-labeled RA neurons were large in females which received an implant of estrogen immediately after hatching. The gender differences in the neuron size and nuclear volume of the zebra finch RA are, therefore, due not to the replacement of old neurons by new ones during development but to the growth and atrophy of neurons born before hatching. Similarly, the masculinizing effects of estrogen on the female RA are due not to neuronal replacement but to the prevention of atrophy and promotion of growth in preexisting neurons
From central pattern generator to sensory template in the evolution of birdsong by Masakazu Konishi( )

1 edition published in 2010 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Central nervous networks, be they a part of the human brain or a group of neurons in a snail, may be designed to produce distinct patterns of movement. Central pattern generators can account for the development and production of normal vocal signals without auditory feedback in non-songbirds. Songbirds need auditory feedback to develop and maintain the normal song of their species. The prerequisite for the use of auditory feedback for the control of song is a set of acoustic criteria or a template to which voice must match. The template method perhaps evolved to free birds from fixed central pattern generators, resulting in the evolution of diverse and complex songs among oscine songbirds. The evolution of human speech may have followed a similar course
Mappings of the cerebral cortex by George John Carman( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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The design of animal communication
Alternative Names
Konishi, Mark 1933-

Konishi, Masakazu

Konishi, Masakazu 1933-

Masakazu Konishi Amerikaans bioloog

Masakazu Konishi japanisch-US-amerikanischer Ethologe und Neurophysiologe

Кониси, Масакадзу

コニシ, マサカズ 1933-

小西正一

小西正一 1933-

Languages
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Colloquium on Auditory Neuroscience : development, transduction, and integration