WorldCat Identities

Symcox, Linda

Overview
Works: 15 works in 48 publications in 3 languages and 2,177 library holdings
Genres: History  Bibliography  Case studies  Exhibition catalogs  Abstracts 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Linda Symcox
National history standards : the problem of the canon and the future of teaching history by Linda Symcox( )

10 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 1,085 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

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Whose history? : the struggle for national standards in American classrooms by Linda Symcox( Book )

5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 636 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the 1990s the debate over what and whose history should be taught in U.S. schools resonated through the halls of the U.S. Congress, the national press, and the nation's schools. Some politicians and pundits denounced the findings of the National Standards for History, which subsequently became a major battleground in the nation's ongoing struggle to define its historical identity. To help readers understand what happened, this book traces the genealogy of the National History Standards Project from its origins as a neo-conservative reform movement to the drafting of the standards, through the 18 months of controversy, the debate that ensued, and the aftermath. Broad in scope, the case study includes debates on U.S. social history, world history, multiculturalism, established canons, national identity, cultural history, and liberal education. It illuminates the larger issue of how educational policy is made and contested in the United States, revealing how a debate about children's education actually became a struggle between competing political forces. Following the introduction, there are seven chapters: (1) "History Repeats Itself: Reform Cycles and the Social Studies Curriculum"0; (2) "Mapping an Alternative History: Shifting Historical Paradigms, 1960-1990"; (3) "a Conservative Restoration, 1981-Present"; (4) "Genesis of the National Center for History in the Schools and the National History Standards Project, 1987-1992"; (5) "Forging Unity: The National History Standards Project, 1992-1994"; (6) "The Consensus Unravels: The National History Standards in the Culture Wars, 1994-1996"; and (7) "Conclusion: Utopia Postponed." Two appendices include: "National History Standards Project Organizational Structure"; and "Overview of the Thirty One U.S. History Standards." Each chapter includes notes. Contains extensive references and a supplementary bibliography. (Bt)
Social justice, peace, and environmental education : transformative standards by Julie Andrzejewski( Book )

9 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 310 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Based on collaborative work devoted to social justice issues, this collection provides a broad-ranging and thoughtful discussion of what standards developed from an inclusive social justice perspective might look like
The golden age of Greece : imperial democracy 500-400 B.C. : a unit of study for grades 6-12 by Peter Cheoros( Book )

3 editions published between 1991 and 2012 in English and held by 36 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. This unit explores Greece's most glorious century, the high point of Athenian culture. Rarely has so much genius been concentrated in one small region over such a short period of time. Students discover in studying Greece's Classical Age many aspects of their own heritage. Present day ideas of government, philosophy, literature, science, and aesthetics can be linked directly back to Ancient Greece. Without an awareness of this remarkable heritage and an appreciation for the creativity of the period, along with an appreciation of other ancient civilizations, students cannot begin to understand enduring values and the creative power of humankind. While studying the unit students also become aware of the conflicts in human values that are an enduring and unavoidable part of human society. In this unit students will explore various aspects of the remarkable culture of imperial Athens. They study the origin of Athenian naval power during the Persian Wars, learn how Athenians passed laws, contemplate the brilliance of Athenian imperial culture as reflected in the Parthenon, examine its decline in the Peloponnesian War, and consider the nature of Athenian citizenship and its problems as illustrated by the institution of ostracism, Sophocles' play "Antigone," and the trial of Socrates. A chronological table of Greek politics and culture from 750 to 400 B.C. is included. Contains 37 references. (Author/DK)
Selected teaching materials for United States & world history : an annotated bibliography by Linda Symcox( Book )

5 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This annotated bibliography describes 55 titles of teaching materials that have been selected in order to provide history teachers with a list of high quality resources to supplement their textbooks. The materials are organized into the following categories: America: All Periods; Eighteenth Century America and the Revolution; The Constitutional Period; Nineteenth Century America; Twentieth Century America; World History; Women's History; and National Center for History in the Schools Teaching Units. Each entry includes the title, author or publisher, date, type of materials, length, grade level, source, and description. (DB)
The neolithic revolution : the first farmers and shepherds : a unit of study for grades 6-8 by Linda Symcox( Book )

4 editions published between 1991 and 2001 in English and held by 30 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This unit presents lessons on the New Stone Age or Neolithic period from 8,000 to 3,500 B.C. The unit attempts to develop the profound changes in human society brought about by the domestication of plants and animals. The development of agriculture and the resultant move from wandering hunter gatherers to settled villages has been called the great leap forward in the history of humankind. Lesson 1 places the Neolithic period in its geological time frame and explains the discoveries made by archaeologists, which are the only source of information for this period. Lesson 2 describes the shift from hunting and gathering to herding and farming. Lesson 3 discusses the archaeological sites of Beidha and Catal Huyuk as examples of permanent villages and houses. Lesson 4 covers developments in both decorative and religious arts. It is essential that students of world history understand that the Neolithic Revolution was the necessary foundation for the great civilizations that followed. It was the most important single innovation in the evolution of human society before the Industrial Revolution. Through agriculture humans now controlled and regulated their food supply rather than depending on the caprice of nature. What domestication did was create an assured food supply and large settled communities and ultimately cities. Archaeologists and anthropologists have shown that early farming involved much more labor and much more risk than did hunting and gathering. Therefore, a crisis must have forced the change. Many theories exist as to the nature of this crisis. The unit does not emphasize the question of why agriculture developed. Contains 13 references. (Author/DK)
Crowning the cathedral of Florence : Brunelleschi builds his dome : a unit of study for grades 7-10 by Linda Symcox( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This unit focuses on a dramatic moment in the Renaissance from about 1420 when Filippo Brunelleschi single handedly created, defined, and engineered a new architecture by building the great dome of the cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence. The dome became the symbol of Florence's grandeur during the Renaissance, and a model for great public buildings. Brunelleschi was among the first to undertake a systematic study of ancient Roman architecture both as a model of the architectural grandeur that he felt had been lost during the Middle Ages, and as a model for spatial organization and large-scale engineering that had been forgotten in Western Europe. He combined his new found knowledge of Roman design and building techniques with his own vision, defining a new aesthetic for his own era. One of the great monuments of western architecture, the dome provides a model for a whole tradition of grand public building. It represents a classic case study of the interaction between the collective energies of a community and the genius of an individual. By studying Brunelleschi's grand vision for the dome to crown the cathedral, the economic and political background against which his dream became a reality, the great competition organized by the city for the commission to build the dome, the engineering challenges which had to be overcome, and the impact of Brunelleschi's work on future generations, students will begin to understand and appreciate the creative surge which took hold in Florence and other parts of Italy during the Renaissance. Contains 11 references. (Author/DK)
The Harlem Renaissance : a unit of study for grades 9-12 by Nina Gifford( Book )

1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This teaching unit represents a specific "dramatic moment" in history that can allow students to delve into the deeper meanings of selected landmark events and explore their wider context in the great historical narrative. Studying a crucial turning point in history helps students realize that history is an ongoing, open-ended process, and that the decisions they make today create the conditions of tomorrow's history. This unit is about the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance is part of the post-World War I cultural upheaval that found all of U.S. society trying to come to terms with the shift from a rural way of life to an urban and industrialized one. The unit can be taught after studying World War I or as a transition to the era of the Great Depression and the New Deal. The unit is based on primary sources taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. Within the unit are teacher background materials that provide an overview of the entire unit and the historical information and context necessary to link the "dramatic moment" to the larger historical narrative. Lesson plans include a variety of ideas and approaches. An extensive bibliography contains 7 items about painting and sculpture, 13 poem citations, 12 articles and maps, and 7 recording dates. (Bt)
Social justice, peace, and environmental education standards : a transformative framework for educators( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

National history standards the problem of the canon and the future of teaching history( Recording )

1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Land of golden dreams : California in the Gold Rush decade, 1848-1858 ; a unit of study for grades 4-5 by Linda Symcox( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

National History Standards: The Problem of the Canon and the Future of Teaching History (International Review of History Education) by Arie Wilschut( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A case study in the politics of educational reform in the U.S. : the storm over the national standards for history by Linda Symcox( )

1 edition published in 1998 in Italian and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The great experiment, George Washington and the American republic : a unit of study for grades 8-12 by Kirk Ankeney( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Separating George Washington the man from Washington the legend is difficult for historians and students alike because his fame complicates historical scrutiny. Washington owned slaves and ambitiously sought power, yet he freed his slaves upon his death and he used his power to forge a democratic nation. Throughout this unit students examine Washington's letters, public papers, and speeches which reveal the personal traits and leadership qualities that characterized the man rather than the legend. The unit contains objectives, correlations to the National History Standards, teacher background materials, lesson plans, student resources, and a selected bibliography. Six lessons focus student effort on working with primary source documents to investigate Washington's life and achievements. Lesson titles include: (1) "The Making of a Leader"; (2) "Military Leader: George Washington and the American Revolution"; (3) "George Washington and the Constitution"; (4) "George Washington as President"; (5) "George Washington and the Native Americans"; and (6) "George Washington and Slavery." Although the lessons are recommended for grades 8-12, some of the readings may need to be adapted for effective use by eighth grade students. Contains 15-item selected bibliography. (Bt)
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1 edition published in 2015 in Korean and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Whose history? : the struggle for national standards in American classrooms
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Whose history? : the struggle for national standards in American classroomsSocial justice, peace, and environmental education : transformative standardsSocial justice, peace, and environmental education standards : a transformative framework for educators
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