WorldCat Identities

Belbruno, Edward 1951-

Overview
Works: 13 works in 71 publications in 2 languages and 2,592 library holdings
Genres: Popular works  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Edward Belbruno
Fly me to the moon : an insider's guide to the new science of space travel by Edward Belbruno( )

9 editions published between 2007 and 2013 in English and held by 1,565 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When a leaf falls on a windy day, it drifts and tumbles, tossed every which way on the breeze. This is chaos in action. In Fly Me to the Moon, Edward Belbruno shows how to harness the same principle for low-fuel space travel--or, as he puts it, "surfing the gravitational field." Belbruno devised one of the most exciting concepts now being used in space flight, that of swinging through the cosmos on the subtle fluctuations of the planets' gravitational pulls. His idea was met with skepticism until 1991, when he used it to get a stray Japanese satellite back on course to the Moon. The successful rescue represented the first application of chaos to space travel and ushered in an emerging new field. Part memoir, part scientific adventure story, Fly Me to the Moon gives a gripping insider's account of that mission and of Belbruno's personal struggles with the science establishment. Along the way, Belbruno introduces readers to recent breathtaking advances in American space exploration. He discusses ways to capture and redirect asteroids; presents new research on the origin of the Moon; weighs in on discoveries like 2003 UB313 (now named Eris), a dwarf planet detected in the far outer reaches of our solar system--and much more. Grounded in Belbruno's own rigorous theoretical research but written for a general audience, Fly Me to the Moon is for anybody who has ever felt moved by the spirit of discovery
Capture dynamics and chaotic motions in celestial mechanics : with applications to the construction of low energy transfers by Edward Belbruno( Book )

8 editions published between 2004 and 2018 in English and held by 387 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New trends in astrodynamics and applications by International Conference on New Trends in Astrodynamics and Applications( Book )

17 editions published between 2005 and 2009 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This special issue of Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy features 13 selected papers ."
Astrodynamics, space missions, and chaos by New Trends in Astrodynamics and Applications( Book )

12 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New Trends in Astrodynamics and Applications III : Princeton, New Jersey, 16-18 August 2006 by International Conference on New Trends in Astrodynamics and Applications( Book )

8 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 130 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fly me to the moon : using the chaos of gravity to travel in space by Edward Belbruno( Book )

5 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Astrodynamics( Book )

5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Advances in Nonlinear Astrodynamics Conference : November 8-10, 1993 by Advances in Nonlinear Astrodynamics Conference( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Watakushi o tsuki ni tsuretette : Uchū ryokō no aratana kagaku by Edward Belbruno( Book )

2 editions published in 2008 in Japanese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Where did the Moon come from? by Edward Belbruno( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"The current standard theory of the origin of the Moon is that Earth was hit by a giant impactor the size of Mars, causing ejection of iron-poor impactor mantle debris that coalesced to form the Moon. But where did this Mars-sized impactor come from? Isotopic evidence suggests that it came from 1 AU radius in the solar nebula, and computer simulations are consistent with its approaching Earth on a zero-energy parabolic trajectory. But how could such a large object form in the disk of planetesimals at 1 AU without colliding with Earth early on, before having a chance to grow large or before its or Earth's iron core had formed? We propose that the giant impactor could have formed in a stable orbit among debris at Earth's L4 (or L5) Lagrange point. We show that such a configuration is stable, even for a Mars-sized impactor. It could grow gradually by accretion at L4 (or L5), but eventually gravitational interactions with other growing planetesimals could kick it out into a chaotic creeping orbit, which we show would likely cause it to hit Earth on a zero-energy parabolic trajectory. We argue that this scenario is possible and should be further studied."
Special issue on new trends in astrodynamics and applications( Book )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Gauge freedom in orbital mechanics by Michael Efroimsky( Book )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"In orbital and attitude dynamics the coordinates and the Euler angles are expressed as functions of the time and six constants called elements."
On the theory of bodily tides by Michael Efroimsky( Book )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

"Any model of tides is based on a specific hypothesis of how the lag depends on the tidal frequency. A particular form of this dependence will fix the form of the frequency-dependence of the tidal Q factor. Since at present we know the actual shape of the frequency-dependence of Q, we can reverse our line of reasoning and can find the actual frequency-dependence of the lag. This dependence is different from those employed hitherto, and makes a considerable alteration in the theory of tides. The second alteration is needed to evade some difficulties inherent in Kaula's expansion, which is divergent for eccentricities higher than a certain value, and is also subject to 'Goldreich's admonition': due to nonlinearity, the Q factors introduced for higher harmonics are badly defined. We abandon the expansion and introduce an instantaneous tidal frequency that depends on the true anomaly. We also introduce an overall Q factor which too depends on the true anomaly. The third alteration is our departure from the belief that Q is inversely proportional to the "tangential lag" (the angle subtended at the planet's centre between the moon and the bulge). That this is correct only in the limit of a circular equatorial orbit was pointed out by Kaula. We show that in general Q is interconnected not with the 'tangential lag', but with an overall lag that incorporates both the 'tangential' and 'radial' ones. (While the "tangential" lag emerges because the location of the bulge lags, the 'radial' lag comes into play since the height of the bulge lags too.) For arbitrary e and i, the total lag and the instantaneous frequency and Q are always interconnected via the same relations as in the trivial case of an equatorial circular orbit. This makes our model concise and convenient."
 
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Audience level: 0.33 (from 0.15 for Fly me to ... to 0.98 for Watakushi ...)

Fly me to the moon : an insider's guide to the new science of space travel Fly me to the moon : using the chaos of gravity to travel in space
Covers
Capture dynamics and chaotic motions in celestial mechanics : with applications to the construction of low energy transfersNew trends in astrodynamics and applicationsAstrodynamics, space missions, and chaosNew Trends in Astrodynamics and Applications III : Princeton, New Jersey, 16-18 August 2006Fly me to the moon : using the chaos of gravity to travel in space
Alternative Names
Edward Belbruno Amerikaans wiskundige

Edward Belbruno deutscher Astronom und Mathematiker

Edward Belbruno German astronomer and mathematician

エドワード・ベルブルーノ

ベルブルーノ, エドワード

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