WorldCat Identities

Percy, Allison

Overview
Works: 15 works in 22 publications in 1 language and 1,312 library holdings
Genres: Surveys 
Classifications: UB369, 362.10684
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Allison Percy Publications about Allison Percy
Publications by  Allison Percy Publications by Allison Percy
Most widely held works by Allison Percy
Quality initiatives undertaken by the Veterans Health Administration by Allison Percy ( Book )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 411 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
And introduction -- The health care system for veterans -- Quality improvements within VHA -- Appendix A: VistA outside the Veterans Health Administration -- Appendix B: Comparing the cost of care from the Veterans Health Administration and alternative sources -- Appendix C: The LinKS dashboard
The potential cost of meeting demand for veterans' health care by Allison Percy ( )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Analyzing the federal benefits available to disabled veterans before the Veterans' Disability Benefits Commission by Allison Percy ( )
2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 235 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The health care system for veterans : an interim report by Allison Percy ( )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Evaluating military compensation ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
To attract and retain the military personnel it needs, the Department of Defense (DoD) must offer a competitive compensation package -- one that adequately rewards service members for the rigors of military life. After reenlistment rates declined in the late 1990s, law makers and DoD began increasing cash and noncash elements of military compensation. In 2000, for example, they authorized that basic pay for service members would rise 0.5 percentage points faster than wages in the civilian sector through 2006. Housing allowances and other compensation also were increased. As a result, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates, regular military compensation adjusted for inflation -- basic pay, allowances for food and housing, and the tax advantage that arises because those allowances are not subject to federal income tax -- grew by 21 percent for the active-duty enlisted force as a whole between 2000 and 2006. This study looks at compensation for the 83 percent of active-duty U.S. service members who are enlisted personnel. It considers various ways to measure military compensation and examines common methods of -- and problems with -- comparing that compensation with pay and benefits in the civilian sector. The analysis also explores the connection between the components of military compensation and the military's recruiting and retention of personnel. Finally, the study discusses possible options to make the military compensation system visible to service members and decision makers and more efficient
The long-term implications of current defense plans and alternatives : summary update for fiscal year 2006 ( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
What level of budgetary resources might be needed in the long term to execute the Administration's current plans for defense, and what effect on that level would alternative defense plans have? This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) paper addresses those questions. Prepared at the request of the Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, it updates the resource projections contained in CBO's September 2004 paper The Long-Term Implications of Current Defense Plans: Summary Update for Fiscal Year 2005 to reflect the changes that the Administration has made to its defense plans in preparing the President's budget request for fiscal year 2006. In addition, this paper includes two alternative scenarios that could reduce the level of defense resources required during the 2012-2024 projection period. CBO will also publish supplementary data on its Web site that provide more details about specific programs. In keeping with CBO's mandate to provide impartial analysis, this paper and the supplementary materials make no recommendations
Estimated costs of U.S. operations in Iraq under two specified scenarios ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
At the request of the Ranking Member of the House Budget Committee, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has estimated the funding provided for military and diplomatic operations in Iraq through June 30, 2006, as well as the related costs incurred by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for medical care, disability compensation, and survivor benefits. CBO also has projected the costs of those activities over the next 10 years under two scenarios. According to CBO's estimates, from the time U.S. forces invaded Iraq in March 2003, $290 billion has been allocated for activities in Iraq, of which $254 billion has gone to the DoD and other defense agencies for military operations. In the first scenario, the number of forces deployed in and around Iraq would be reduced from the current level of approximately 190,000 to 140,000 in 2007 and would continue to decline rapidly until all troops were withdrawn from the Iraq theater of operations by the end of 2009. By CBO's estimates, that scenario would require additional appropriations totaling $166 billion for military operations over the 2007-2016 period. In the second scenario, the number of troops deployed to the Iraq theater of operations would decline less rapidly, from 170,000 in 2007 to 40,000 by the end of 2010 and would remain at that lower level through 2016. That scenario would require the appropriation of $368 billion for military operations over the 2007-2016 period. CBO assumes that the costs of establishing Iraqi security forces, conducting diplomatic and consular operations, and providing foreign aid would be roughly the same under both scenarios. Thus, funding for Iraqi security forces could total approximately $15 billion over the next 10 years, and funding for diplomatic operations and foreign aid could cost another $15 billion over the same period. Additional costs for the VA over the 2007-2016 period would sum to approximately $6 billion under the first scenario and $8 billion under the second one
Long-Term Implications of the Fiscal Year 2009 Future Years Defense Program ( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Decisions about national defense that are made today -- whether they involve weapon systems, military compensation, or numbers of personnel -- can have long-lasting effects on the composition of the nation's armed forces and the budgetary resources needed to support them. Over the past six years, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has published a series of reports about its projections of the resources that might be needed over the long term to carry out the Bush Administration's plans as expressed in the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP). The FYDP is prepared by the Department of Defense (DoD) for each fiscal year and submitted to the Congress as part of the President's budget request. This paper, like CBO's previous reports, provides long-term projections (in this case, through 2026) of the costs of DoD's current plans -- that is, the plans contained in the 2009 FYDP, which specifically addresses fiscal years 2009 through 2013. The 2009 FYDP was transmitted in April 2008, and it reflects changes to the department's programs and priorities since February 2007. The 2009 FYDP and CBO's projections of its long-term implications exclude potential future supplemental or emergency appropriations; CBO's projections include additional appropriations that have already been enacted
The long-term implications of current defense plans : summary update for fiscal year 2005 ( )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
What level of resources might be needed in the long term to execute the Bush Administration's current plans for defense? This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) paper -- prepared at the request of the Chairman of the Senate Budget Committee, addresses that question. It updates the resource projections contained in CBO's July 2003 paper "The Long-Term Implications of Current Defense Plans: Summary Update for Fiscal Year 2004" to reflect the changes that the Administration made to its defense plans in preparing the President's budget request for fiscal year 2005. As a supplement to this paper, CBO also has published an updated briefing on its Web site (www.cbo.gov) that provides more details about specific programs. In keeping with CBO's mandate to provide impartial analysis, this paper and the supplemental briefing make no recommendations
A CBO Study: Growth in Medical Spending by the Department of Defense ( )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The Department of Defense (DoD) faces a growing burden in providing peacetime health care for military personnel, retirees, and their dependents and survivors-who all together number over 8 million. Adjusted for the overall rate of inflation in the U.S. economy, the department's annual spending on medical care almost doubled from 1988 to 2003, rising from $14.6 billion to $27.2 billion. Furthermore, because DoD cut the size of the active-duty force by 38 percent over that same period, medical spending per active-duty service member nearly tripled, rising from $6,600 to $19,600.' Medical spending rose from one-quarter to more than one-half of the level of cash compensation (defined as basic pay, the housing allowance, and the subsistence allowance), and it is likely to continue to increase
The effects of price regulation on productivity in pharmaceuticals by Patricia Munch Danzon ( )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The revolutionary potential of Mexico in the 1980s ( )
1 edition published in 1987 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Long-term implications of current defense plans summary update for fiscal year 2007 ( )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Decisions about national defense that are made today whether they involve weapon systems, military compensation, or numbers of personnel can have long-lasting effects on the composition of U.S. armed forces and the budgetary resources needed to support them. In the past four years, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has published a series of reports projecting the resources that might be needed over the long term to carry out the plans in the Administration's then-current Future Years Defense Program (FYDP). Prepared by the Department of Defense (DoD), the FYDP is submitted to the Congress each fiscal year as part of the President's budget request. This paper, like CBO's previous reports, provides longterm projections (in this case, through 2024) of the potential costs of DoD's current plans that is, those plans contained in the 2007 FYDP, which covers fiscal years 2007 through 2011. The 2007 FYDP reflects changes to the department's programs and priorities since February 2005, including changes to the defense program that the Administration now plans as a result of the 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR). The 2007 FYDP and CBO's projections both exclude potential future supplemental appropriations
Cost recovery for immunization : worldwide survey experience by Allison Percy ( Book )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
 
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Languages
English (22)