WorldCat Identities

Zhang, Junfu

Overview
Works: 17 works in 50 publications in 1 language and 380 library holdings
Genres: Longitudinal studies 
Roles: Creator
Classifications: HB1, 338.47660609794
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Junfu Zhang Publications about Junfu Zhang
Publications by  Junfu Zhang Publications by Junfu Zhang
Most widely held works by Junfu Zhang
The dynamics of California's biotechnology industry by Junfu Zhang ( Book )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The effects of Wal-Mart on local labor markets by David Neumark ( )
12 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 67 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"We estimate the effects of Wal-Mart stores on county-level employment and earnings, accounting for endogeneity of the location and timing of Wal-Mart openings that most likely biases the evidence against finding adverse effects of Wal-Mart stores. We address the endogeneity problem using a natural instrumental variable that arises from the geographic and time pattern of the opening of Wal-Mart stores, which slowly spread out from the first stores in Arkansas. In the retail sector, on average, Wal-Mart stores reduce employment by two to four percent. There is some evidence that payrolls per worker also decline, by about 3.5 percent, but this conclusion is less robust. Either way, though, retail earnings fall. Overall, there is some evidence that Wal-Mart stores increase total employment on the order of two percent, although not all of the evidence supports this conclusion. There is stronger evidence that total payrolls per person decline, by about five percent in the aggregate, implying that residents of local labor markets earn less following the opening of Wal-Mart stores. And in the South, where Wal-Mart stores are most prevalent and have been open the longest, the evidence indicates that Wal-Mart reduces retail employment, total employment, and total payrolls per person"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Employment dynamics and business relocation : new evidence from the National Establishment Time Series by David Neumark ( Book )
8 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We analyze and assess new evidence on employment dynamics from a new data source, the National Establishment Time Series (NETS). The NETS offers advantages over existing data sources for studying employment dynamics, including tracking business establishment relocations that can contribute to job creation or destruction on a regional level. Our primary purpose in this paper is to assess the reliability of the NETS data along a number of dimensions, and we conclude that it is a reliable data source although not without limitations. We also illustrate the usefulness of the NETS data by reporting, for California, a full decomposition of employment change into its six constituent processes, including job creation and destruction stemming from business relocation, which has figured prominently in policy debates but on which there has been no systematic evidence
High-tech start-ups and industry dynamics in Silicon Valley by Junfu Zhang ( Book )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 48 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Do small businesses create more jobs? new evidence from the National Establishment Time Series by David Neumark ( )
5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We use a new database, the National Establishment Time Series (NETS), to revisit the debate about the role of small businesses in job creation. Birch (e.g., 1987) argued that small firms are the most important source of job creation in the U.S. economy, but Davis et al. (1996a) argued that this conclusion was flawed, and based on improved methods and using data for the manufacturing sector they concluded that there was no relationship between establishment size and net job creation. Using the NETS data, we examine evidence for the overall economy, as well as for different sectors. The results indicate that small establishments and small firms create more jobs, on net, although the difference is much smaller than what is suggested by Birch's methods. However, the negative relationship between establishment size and job creation is much less clear for the manufacturing sector, which may explain some of the earlier findings contradicting Birch's conclusions
Fertility differences between married and cohabiting couples a switching regression analysis ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The advantage of experienced start up founders in venture capital acquisition evidence from serial entrepreneurs by Junfu Zhang ( )
3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A study of academic entrepreneurs using venture capital data by Junfu Zhang ( )
3 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Tipping and residential segregation a unified schelling model by Junfu Zhang ( )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper presents a Schelling-type checkerboard model of residential segregation formulated as a spatial game. It shows that although every agent prefers to live in a mixed-race neighborhood, complete segregation is observed almost all of the time. A concept of tipping is rigorously defined, which is crucial for understanding the dynamics of segregation. Complete segregation emerges and persists in the checkerboard model precisely because tipping is less likely to occur to such residential patterns. Agent-based simulations are used to illustrate how an integrated residential area is tipped into complete segregation and why this process is irreversible. This model incorporates insights from Schelling's two classical models of segregation (the checkerboard model and the neighborhood tipping model) and puts them on a rigorous footing. It helps us better understand the persistence of residential segregation in urban America
Are businesses fleeing the state? : interstate business relocation and employment change in California by David Neumark ( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Fertility differences between married and cohabiting couples a switching regression analysis by Junfu Zhang ( )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Do small businesses create more jobs? New evidence for the United States from the national establishment time series by David Neumark ( )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We use a new database, the National Establishment Time Series (NETS), to revisit the debate about the role of small businesses in job creation. Birch (e.g., 1987) argued that small firms are the most important source of job creation in the U.S. economy. But Davis et al. (1996a) argued that this conclusion was flawed, and based on improved methods and using data for the manufacturing sector, they concluded that there was no relationship between establishment size and net job creation. Using the NETS data, we examine evidence for the overall economy, as well as for different sectors. The results indicate that small firms and small establishments create more jobs, on net, although the difference is much smaller than what is suggested by Birch's methods. Moreover, in the recent period we study, a negative relationship between establishment size and job creation holds for both the manufacturing and services sectors. -- Job creation ; job destruction ; small businesses
Social-family network and self-employment : evidence from temporary rural-urban migrants in China/ Junfu Zhang; Zhong Zhao by Junfu Zhang ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
We hypothesize that individuals with a larger social-family network are more likely to choose self-employment. We test this hypothesis using data on temporary rural-urban migrants in China. The size of a migrant's social-family network is measured by the number of relatives and friends this migrant greeted during the past Spring Festival. Our empirical analysis faces two challenges. First, there is an endogeneity problem in that a migrant may want to develop and maintain a large social-family network exactly because he is self-employed. For this reason, a simple correlation between the probability of being self-employed and the size of the migrant's social-family network cannot be interpreted as causal. Second, the size of the social-family network is measured using survey data, which is subject to measurement error. To overcome these problems, we take an instrumental variable (IV) approach. More specifically, we examine the distance an individual migrated when he first moved to a city and use this variable to instrument for the current size of the social-family network. We establish the credibility of the IV by emphasizing the unique institutional context of rural-urban migration in China and focusing on the sample of migrants who originally started as wage workers in urban areas and currently are not in their first jobs. Our IV results indeed show that a rural-urban migrant with a larger social-family network is more likely to be self-employed in the city. This finding is robust to alternative model specifications and various restrictions on the sample used in estimation. -- social-family network ; self-employment ; rural-urban migrants
A study of academic entrepreneurs using venture capital data by Junfu Zhang ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Academic entrepreneurship has become an increasingly important channel through which universities contribute to economic development. This paper studies academic entrepreneurs using a comprehensive venture capital database. I find that about two-thirds of the academic entrepreneurs locate their businesses in the same state as their universities. National academy membership and number of faculty awards, measures of a university's research quality, are the most significant variables in explaining the number of academic entrepreneurs from a university. In contrast, the abundance of venture capital near the university has no significant effect on academic entrepreneurship
Tipping and residential segregation: a unified schelling model by Junfu Zhang ( )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper presents a Schelling-type checkerboard model of residential segregation formulated as a spatial game. It shows that although every agent prefers to live in a mixed-race neighborhood, complete segregation is observed almost all of the time. A concept of tipping is rigorously defined, which is crucial for understanding the dynamics of segregation. Complete segregation emerges and persists in the checkerboard model precisely because tipping is less likely to occur to such residential patterns. Agent-based simulations are used to illustrate how an integrated residential area is tipped into complete segregation and why this process is irreversible. This model incorporates insights from Schelling's two classical models of segregation (the checkerboard model and the neighborhood tipping model) and puts them on a rigorous footing. It helps us better understand the persistence of residential segregation in urban America
Fertility differences between married and cohabiting couples: a switching regression analysis by Junfu Zhang ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Little is known about why cohabiting couples have fewer children than married couples. We explore the factors that explain the difference in fertility between these two groups using a switching regression analysis, which enables us to quantify the contribution of different factors through a decomposition of the difference. We find that married couples have more children than cohabiting couples primarily because marriage provides stronger incentives for specialization in household production. Unobserved self-selection plays a less important role
The advantage of experienced start-up founders in venture capital acquisition: evidence from serial entrepreneurs by Junfu Zhang ( )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Existing literature suggests that entrepreneurs with prior firm-founding experience have more skills and social connections than novice entrepreneurs. Such skills and social connections could give experienced founders some advantage in the process of raising venture capital. This paper uses a large database of venture-backed companies and their founders to examine experienced founders' access to venture capital. Compared to novice entrepreneurs, entrepreneurs with venture-backed founding experience tend to raise more venture capital at an early round of financing and tend to complete the early round much more quickly. In contrast, experienced founders whose earlier firms were not venture-backed do not show a similar advantage over novice entrepreneurs, suggesting the importance of connections with venture capitalists in the early stage of venture capital financing. However, when the analysis also takes into account later rounds of financing, all entrepreneurs with prior founding experience appear to raise more venture capital. This implies that skills acquired from any previous founding experience can make an entrepreneur perform better and in turn attract more venture capital
 
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Alternative Names
Junfu, Zhang 1970-
Zhang, J. 1970-
Zhang, Junfu
Languages
English (50)