WorldCat Identities

O'Rourke, Ronald

Overview
Works: 206 works in 853 publications in 1 language and 8,344 library holdings
Genres: History  Naval history  Forecasts 
Roles: Author, Editor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ronald O'Rourke
Naval issues : background and operations by Ronald O'Rourke( )

7 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 1,191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Homeland security : Coast Guard operations - background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( Book )

31 editions published between 2002 and 2007 in English and held by 305 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Department of Defense (DOD), which includes the Navy, has been designated the lead federal agency for homeland defense (HLD), while the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which includes the Coast Guard, has been designated the lead federal agency for homeland security (HLS). Several Navy activities contribute to HLS and HLD. The Navy's HLS and HLD operations raise several potential oversight issues for Congress, including Navy coordination with the Coast Guard in HLS and HLD operations
Naval transformation : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( Book )

25 editions published between 2001 and 2007 in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Department of the Navy (DoN) has several efforts underway to transform U.S. naval forces to prepare them for future military challenges. DoN officials are generally satisfied with the scope and pace of their transformation efforts, but some advocates of defense transformation are not and recommend that current efforts be accelerated or expanded. This report focuses on the transformation of U.S. naval forces -- the Navy and the Marine Corps, which are both contained in the Department of the Navy (DoN). The issue for Congress is whether the current DoN transformation efforts are sufficient, and if not, what the options might be for accelerating or expanding these efforts. This report will be updated as events warrant
Navy network-centric warfare concept : key programs and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( Book )

20 editions published between 2001 and 2005 in English and held by 205 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The concept of network-centric warfare (NCW) is a key element of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) transformation effort. NCW focuses on using computers, high-speed data links, and networking software to link military personnel, platforms, and formations into highly integrated local and wide-area networks. Within these networks, personnel will share large amounts of critical information on a rapid and continuous basis. DoD believes that NCW will dramatically improve combat capability and efficiency. Key programs for implementing NCW in the Navy include the Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC), the Joint Fires Network (JFN), the IT-21 program, and ForceNet. A related program is the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI). Congress has closely followed and expressed concern for some of these programs, particularly NMCI. This report may be updated if developments warrant
Navy CG(X) Cruiser Program: Background, Oversight Issues, and Options for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

22 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Navy is currently developing technologies and studying design options for a planned new cruiser called the CG(X). The Navy wants to procure CG(X)s as replacements for its 22 existing Ticonderoga (CG-47) class Aegis cruisers. The Navy wants the CG(X)s to be highly capable ships, particularly in the areas of anti-air warfare (AAW) and ballistic missile defense (BMD). On April 6, 2009, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates announced a decision to "delay the CG-X next generation cruiser program to revisit both the requirements and acquisition strategy" for the program. Gates' announcement is broadly consistent with press reports about the Navy's intention to defer procurement of the first CG(X) to about FY2017. The Navy has not yet announced a preferred design concept for the CG(X). The Navy originally intended to use the design of its new DDG-1000 destroyer as the basis for the CG(X) design, but this no longer appears to be the Navy's preferred approach. Section 1012 of the FY2008 defense authorization act (H.R. 4986/P.L. 110-181 of January 28, 2008) makes it U.S. policy to construct the major combatant ships of the Navy, including the CG(X), with integrated nuclear power systems, unless the Secretary of Defense submits a notification to Congress that the inclusion of an integrated nuclear power system is not in the national interest. The Navy has studied nuclear power as a design option for the CG(X), but has not yet announced whether it would prefer to build the CG(X) as a nuclear-powered ship. The February 2009 press report about the Navy possibly reducing the CG(X) program to 8 ships also stated that the Navy was considering procuring those 8 ships at a rate of one ship every 3 years. Such a procurement profile might be consistent with the idea of building the CG(X) as a large, nuclear-powered ship with a displacement in the general range of about 20,000 tons. The Navy's proposed FY2009 budget requested $370 million for research and development work on the CG(X)
China naval modernization : implications for U.S. Navy capabilities by Ronald O'Rourke( Book )

50 editions published between 2005 and 2014 in English and held by 198 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Concern has grown in Congress and elsewhere about China's military modernization. The topic is an increasing factor in discussions over future required U.S. Navy capabilities. The issue for Congress addressed in this report is: How should China's military modernization be factored into decisions about U.S. Navy programs? Several elements of China's military modernization have potential implications for future required U.S. Navy capabilities. These include theater-range ballistic missiles (TBMs), land-attack cruise missiles (LACMs), anti-ship cruise missiles (ASCMs), surface-to-air missiles (SAMs), land-based aircraft, submarines, surface combatants, amphibious ships, naval mines, nuclear weapons, and possibly highpower microwave (HPM) devices. China's naval limitations or weaknesses include capabilities for operating in waters more distant from China, joint operations, C4ISR (command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance), long-range surveillance and targeting systems, anti-air warfare (AAW), antisubmarine warfare (ASW), mine countermeasures (MCM), and logistics. Observers believe a near-term focus of China's military modernization is to field a force that can succeed in a short-duration conflict with Taiwan and act as an antiaccess force to deter U.S. intervention or delay the arrival of U.S. forces, particularly naval and air forces, in such a conflict. Some analysts speculate that China may attain (or believe that it has attained) a capable maritime anti-access force, or elements of it, by about 2010. Other observers believe this will happen later. Potential broader or longer-term goals of China's naval modernization include asserting China's regional military leadership and protecting China's maritime territorial, economic, and energy interests. China's naval modernization has potential implications for required U.S. Navy capabilities in terms of preparing for a conflict in the Taiwan Strait area, maintaining U.S. Navy presence and military influence in the Western Pacific, and countering Chinese ballistic missile submarines. Preparing for a conflict in the Taiwan Strait area could place a premium on the following: on-station or early-arriving Navy forces, capabilities for defeating China's maritime anti-access forces, and capabilities for operating in an environment that could be characterized by information warfare and possibly electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and the use of nuclear weapons. Certain options are available for improving U.S. Navy capabilities by 2010; additional options, particularly in shipbuilding, can improve U.S. Navy capabilities in subsequent years. China's naval modernization raises potential issues for Congress concerning the role of China in Department of Defense (DOD) and Navy planning; the size of the Navy; the Pacific Fleet's share of the Navy; forward homeporting of Navy ships in the Western Pacific; the number of aircraft carriers, submarines, and ASW-capable platforms; Navy missile defense, air-warfare, AAW, ASW, and mine warfare programs; Navy computer network security; and EMP hardening of Navy systems. This report will be updated as events warrant
China's foreign conventional arms acquisitions : background and analysis by Shirley Kan( )

6 editions published between 2000 and 2005 in English and held by 155 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This CRS Report examines the major, foreign conventional weapon systems that China has acquired or has committed to acquire since 1990, with particular attention to implications for U.S. security concerns. It is not the assumption of this report that China's military, the People's Liberation Army (PLA), will engage in conflict with other forces in Asia. Nonetheless, since the mid-1990s, there has been increasing concern about China's assertiveness in Asia and military buildup against Taiwan. Since 1990, China has acquired or sought to acquire select types and modest quantities of modern foreign weapons, primarily from Russia. These include: Mi-17 helicopters, Il-76 transports, Su-27 fighters, S-300 surface-to-air missile (SAM) systems, Kilo submarines, Tor-M1 SAM systems, Sovremenny destroyers (with Sunburn anti-ship cruise missiles (ASCMs)), A-50 airborne warning and control systems (AWACS) (Israeli Phalcon system canceled in 2000), and Su-30 long-range fighters. The Su-27 and Su-30 represent significant upgrades in fighter aircraft capability over China's indigenous aircraft. The combination of the PLA's imported AA-11 air-to-air missile and highly maneuverable aircraft could prove a vexing air-to-air challenge to modern fighter aircraft of other forces in Asia. The Russian SAMs represent marked improvements in China's ability to target aircraft and missiles that threaten its airspace. Nonetheless, the PLA's ability to employ its modern acquisitions is hampered by factors such as limited inventory, deficient maintenance, inadequate pilot training, outdated air doctrine, rigid command, disparate communications, and lack of supporting capabilities in the near term. China's navy has been primarily a coastal defense force built around ships based largely on older or obsolete Soviet technology. China's two Sovremenny-class ships are considerably more technologically modern, complex, and capable than most other PLA surface combatants
Defense transformation : background and oversight issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( Book )

17 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Bush Administration identified transformation as a major goal for the Department of Defense (DOD) soon after taking office, and initially justified many of its proposals for DOD on the grounds that they were needed for defense transformation. Although defense transformation is still discussed in administration defense-policy documents and budget-justification materials, the concept is now less prominent in discussions of U.S. defense policy and programs than it was during the earlier years of the Bush Administration. This report will be updated as events warrant
Vieques, Puerto Rico Naval Training Range : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( Book )

13 editions published between 2001 and 2003 in English and held by 138 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On June 14, 2001, the Bush Administration announced that it had decided to end military training operations at the U.S. naval training range on the small Puerto Rican island of Vieques by May 2003. The announcement superceded a January 2000 agreement between President Clinton and the previous Governor of Puerto Rico, Pedro Rossello, that called for holding a referendum on Vieques to decide its future. To implement the Clinton-Rossello plan, Congress in 2000 approved $40 million in assistance funding for Vieques and other legislation as part of P.L. 106-246 (H.R. 4425) and P.L. 106-398 (H.R. 4205). The FY2002 defense authorization act (P.L. 107-107 of December 28, 2001) contains a provision (Section 1049) that (1) canceled the requirement for holding the January 2002 referendum; (2) authorizes the Secretary of the Navy to close the Vieques range if the Secretary certifies that equivalent or superior training facilities exist and are immediately available; (3) requires the Secretary, in making this determination, to take into account the views of Navy and Marine Corps leaders; and (4) transfers the lands to the Department of the Interior if the range is closed. The Senate Armed Services Committee's report (H. Rept. 107-151 of May 15, 2002) on the FY2003 defense authorization bill (S. 2514) directs the Navy to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by March 1, 2003 on plans for joint task force, combined-arms training of naval forces during FY2003, including planned locations and use of live munitions, and on the Navy's progress in identifying an alternate location or locations for the Vieques range
Navy-Marine Corps amphibious and maritime prepositioning ship programs : background and oversight issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

22 editions published between 2004 and 2009 in English and held by 129 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Navy is proposing to maintain in coming years a Navy with 31 amphibious ships and an additional squadron of 14 Maritime Prepositioning Force (Future), or MPF(F), ships. The MPF(F) squadron is intended to implement a new operational concept called sea basing, under which forces would be staged at sea and used to conduct expeditionary operations ashore with little or no reliance on nearby land bases. This report will be updated as events warrant
Air Force F-22 Fighter Program: Background and Issues for Congress( )

3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 123 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Air Force F-22 fighter, also known as the Raptor, is the world's most capable air-to-air combat aircraft. Procurement of F-22s began in FY1999, and a total of 187 have been procured through FY2009, including 24 in FY2009. The administration wants to end F-22 procurement at 187 aircraft, and the administration's proposed FY2010 budget does not request funding for the procurement of additional F-22s in FY2010. The administration argues, among other things, that 187 F-22s will be sufficient in conjunction with other U.S. tactical aircraft, such as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), to meet operational demands for U.S. tactical aircraft. Supporters of the F-22 want to continue procuring the aircraft in FY2010 and subsequent years. They argue, among other things, that Air Force officials have stated that 243 to 250 F-22s would be needed to meet operational demands at a moderate level of operational risk. The issue of F-22 procurement has emerged as one of the highest-profile items of debate on the FY2010 defense budget. The White House on July 13 vowed to veto any bill that supports the acquisition of F-22s beyond the 187 that have been procured through FY2009. The issue for Congress is whether to approve the administration's request to end F-22 procurement at 187 aircraft, or reject that proposal and provide funding in FY2010 for the procurement of additional F-22s in FY2010 and/or subsequent years. Additional issues for Congress for the F-22 program include the reliability and maintainability of in-service F-22s, the F-22 modernization program, and the potential sale of F-22s to Japan. On July 16, 2009, Representative John Murtha, the chairman of the Defense subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee, issued a press release stating that the subcommittee had completed its markup of the FY2010 defense appropriations bill and that the bill as marked includes an additional $369 in advance procurement funding for the procurement of 12 F-22s
Navy Aegis cruiser and destroyer modernization : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

17 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 121 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Navy has begun a multi-billion dollar program to modernize its 84 existing Aegis cruisers and destroyers over a period of more than 20 years. The modernizations are intended to ensure that the ships can be operated cost-effectively throughout their entire 35-year intended service lives. The program poses several potential oversight issues for Congress, including the issue of which shipyards should perform the work, and how the modernization program fits into the Navy's larger plans for the future of its surface combatant force. This report will be updated as events warrant
Navy trident submarine conversion (SSGN) program : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

16 editions published between 2001 and 2008 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the covert strike role, the boats can fulfill a substantial portion of the in-theater Tomahawk missile requirements that are established by regional U.S. military commanders, and thereby permit forward-deployed multimission Navy surface combatants and SSNs to concentrate on other missions. The Polk was retired in 1999 at age 33; the Kamehameha was retired in 2002 at age 36. Trident SSGNs and Navy Transformation. The Bush Administration and other supporters of the Trident SSGN program highlighted the program as an example of defense transformation, citing the conversion of a strategic-nuclear-forces platform into a non-strategic platform, the large number of cruise missiles that an SSGN will carry (which is several times the number that can be carried by a standard Navy attack submarine), and the large payload volume of the boats for carrying future advanced payloads. Others observers demurred, arguing that Navy has converted older SSBNs into SOF-support submarines in the past, that the larger number of cruise missiles that the SSGNs carry is more of a quantitative difference than a qualitative one, and that funding the Trident SSGN program may actually have slowed the transformation of the Navy's submarine force by reducing the amount of funding available for research and development efforts supporting more radical and transformational changes to the Virginia-class attack submarine design. The submarine community intends to maximize the transformational value of the SSGNs by using them as at-sea test beds for new ideas, such as using submarines to deploy large-diameter, highly capable unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Even if one judges the program not transformational, one might still judge it cost effective in terms of the capabilities it provides and in realizing a full, 42-year return on the original procurement cost of the boats
Navy CVN-21 aircraft carrier program : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

11 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

CVN-21 is the Navy s next planned aircraft carrier. Congress has been providing advance procurement funding for the ship since FY2001. The Navy s FY2006 budget submission requests $565 million in FY2006 advance procurement funding for the ship and defers its procurement by one year, to FY2008. The Navy estimates that CVN-21 would cost about $3.2 billion to develop and about $10.5 billion to procure, for a total estimated acquisition cost of about $13.7 billion. This report will be updated as events warrant
Navy major shipbuilding programs and shipbuilders : issues and options for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

6 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Under the FY1996-FY2OO1 Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP), major ships will be procured for the Navy at less than half the rate of the 198Os. As a result, production rates at 6 shipyards, which have carried out all of the Navy's major shipbuilding programs since the latter 198Os, will be much lower in total for the next several years than they were during the 198Os. This has raised two key policy issues for Congress: Is the FY1996-FY2OO1 shipbuilding plan adequate?; How many major Navy shipbuilders are needed to meet the Navy's needs? Congress' decisions on these two key issues could affect the future size and structure of the Navy, future Navy funding requirements, the structure of the U.S. shipbuilding industry, thousands of shipbuilding-related jobs, and the health of local economies in several U.S. regions. This report examines these two key issues and discusses options for Congress. Following the introductory chapter, the second chapter of the report provides background information. The third chapter addresses the two key issues. The final chapter discusses options for Congress. Appendices with additional information appear at the end
DOD leases of foreign built ship : background for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

10 editions published between 2006 and 2010 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prior to the enactment of the FY2008 defense authorization act (H.R. 4986/P.L. 110-181 of January 28, 2008), 10 U.S.C. Section 2401 stated DOD may not lease a vessel or aircraft for a period of more than five years unless it is specifically authorized by law to make such a lease. Operating under this provision, the Department of Defense (DOD) in recent years used lease options and renewals to lease some foreign-built cargo ships for total periods of almost 10 years--a length of time that some observers argue effectively circumvented a legal requirement that U.S. military ships be built in U.S. shipyards. These observers, particularly the American Shipbuilding Association (ASA), proposed reducing the current five-year legal limit on ship leases to two years for foreign-built ships. DOD opposed the idea, arguing that its ship leases are the most cost-effective way to meet its needs for the ships in question. Section 1011 of the FY2008 defense authorization act amended 10 U.S.C. Section 2401 to permit the Secretary of a military department to lease a vessel for a period of greater than two years, but less than five years, only if the Secretary provides a notification of the lease to the House and Senate Armed Services and Appropriations committees (including a detailed description of its terms, a justification for entering it rather than purchasing the vessel, a determination that entering into it is the most cost-effective option; and a plan for meeting the requirement upon the lease's completion), and a period of 30 days of continuous session of Congress has expired
Navy attack submarine force-level goal and procurement rate : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

12 editions published between 2004 and 2007 in English and held by 102 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Navy is currently procuring on Virginia (SSN-774) class attack nuclear-powered submarine (SSN) per year. Each submarine currently costs about $2.4 billion. The FY2007-FY2011 Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP) to be submitted in February 2006 reportedly will propose maintaining the one-per-year procurement rate through FY2011, and then increasing the rate to two per year in FY2012. As of the end of FY2005, the Navy totaled 282 ships, including 54 SSNs. In December 2005, it was reported that the Navy is planning to maintain future fleet of 313 ships, including 48 SSNs. Submarine supporters are concerned that the Navy and DOD are not placing adequate emphasis on attack submarines in Navy force-structure planning and ship-procurement plans
Navy CVN-77 and CVX aircraft carrier programs : background and issues for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

4 editions published between 1998 and 2001 in English and held by 99 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Navy nuclear-powered surface ships : background, issues and options for Congress by Ronald O'Rourke( )

13 editions published between 2007 and 2013 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Some Members of Congress, particularly on the House Armed Services Committee, have expressed interest in expanding the use of nuclear power to a wider array of Navy surface ships, especially the Navy's planned CG(X) cruiser. The Navy wants to procure the first CG(X) in FY2011, and is currently studying design options for the ship, including the use of nuclear power
Terrorist attack on USS Cole : background and issues for Congress by Raphael Perl( )

3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 95 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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China naval modernization : implications for U.S. Navy capabilities
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China naval modernization : implications for U.S. Navy capabilities
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