WorldCat Identities

Ross, Daniel 1970-

Overview
Works: 17 works in 85 publications in 1 language and 2,254 library holdings
Genres: History  Drama  Romantic comedy films  Documentary films  Comedy films  Romance films  Nonfiction films  Made-for-TV movies  Horror films  Fiction 
Roles: Author, Translator, Director, Cinematographer , Producer, Creator, Editor
Classifications: B2430.S7523, 194
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Daniel Ross
Violent democracy by Daniel Ross( )

17 editions published between 2004 and 2005 in English and Undetermined and held by 857 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book will change the way you think about democracy. Challenging conventional wisdom, Daniel Ross shows how violence is an integral part of the democratic system from its origins and into its globalised future. He draws on the examples of global terrorism and security, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the relation of colonial powers to indigenous populations, and the treatment of asylum seekers. His analysis of these controversial issues moves beyond the comfortable stances of both left and right to show that democracy is violent, from its beginning and at its heart."--Jacket
The Ister( Visual )

20 editions published between 2004 and 2009 in English and held by 278 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In 1942 Martin Heidegger delivered a series of lectures on Friedrich Hölderlin's poem The Ister, lectures in which he addressed the political, cultural and military chaos facing Germany at that time. In this film, on a journey from the mouth of the Danube in Romania to its source in the Black Forest, three French philosophers, Bernard Stiegler, Jean-Luc Nancy, Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe, and the German filmmaker Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, ponder Heidegger's philosophical ideas about technology, time, mortality, memory and history, and consider how they relate to today's Europe
Acting out by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Acting Out is the first appearance in English of two short books published by Bernard Stiegler in 2003. In How I Became a Philosopher, he outlines his transformation during a five-year period of incarceration for armed robbery. Isolated from what had been his world, Stiegler began to conduct a kind of experiment in phenomenological research. Inspired by the Greek stoic Epictetus, Stiegler began to read, write, and discover his vocation, eventually studying philosophy in correspondence with Gerard Granel who was an important influence on a number of French philosophers, including Jacques Derrida, who was later Stiegler's teacher." "The second book, To Love, To Love Me, To Love Us, is a powerful distillation of Stiegler's analysis of the contemporary world. He maintains that a growing loss of a sense of individual and collective existence leads to a decreased ability to love oneself, and, by extension, others."--Jacket
What makes life worth living : on pharmacology by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

5 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the aftermath of the First World War, the poet Paul Valéry wrote of a "crisis of spirit", brought about by the instrumentalization of knowledge and the destructive subordination of culture to profit. Recent events demonstrate all too clearly that the stock of mind, or spirit, continues to fall. The economy is toxically organized around the pursuit of short-term gain, supported by an infantilizing, dumbed-down media. Advertising technologies make relentless demands on our attention, reducing us to idiotic beasts, no longer capable of living. Spiralling rates of mental illness show that the fragile life of the mind is at breaking point. Underlying these multiple symptoms is consumer capitalism, which systematically immiserates those whom it purports to liberate. Returning to Marxʹs theory, Stiegler argues that consumerism marks a new stage in the history of proletarianization. It is no longer just labour that is exploited, pushed below the limits of subsistence, but the desire that is characteristic of human spirit. The cure to this malaise is to be found in what Stiegler calls a "pharmacology of the spirit". Here, pharmacology has nothing to do with the chemical supplements developed by the pharmaceutical industry. The pharmakon, defined as both cure and poison, refers to the technical objects through which we open ourselves to new futures, and thereby create the spirit that makes us human. By reference to a range of figures, from Socrates, Simondon and Derrida to the child psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott, Stiegler shows that technics are both the cause of our suffering and also what makes life worth living. -- Publisher description
Automatic society by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

11 editions published between 2016 and 2017 in English and held by 154 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This important new book by one of France's leading philosophers will appeal to students and scholars across the social sciences and humanities, as well as anyone concerned with the future of our societies in a digital age."--Provided by publisher
Disbelief and discredit by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explores the development of industrial technologies and the prospects for human growth
Uncontrollable societies of disaffected individuals by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

4 editions published between 2006 and 2013 in English and held by 98 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Max Weber argued that the development of capitalism would lead to the progressive rationalization and disenchantment of society: today this process is reaching its endpoint and capitalism is collapsing into a disturbing kind of irrationality. It engenders spiritual misery -- a paralysis of the function of the human mind or spirit -- where reason disappears as a motive of hope, a "kingdom of ends" in Kantʹs sense. Absolute disenchantment afflicts all those who no longer have anything to expect from the development of hyper-industrial society. Those who are desperate become "desperados", and they are becoming more and more numerous. No longer having anything to expect means, at the same time, no longer having anything to fear. And the proliferating repressive mechanisms that are supposed to cope with the effects of this loss of authority turn out to be less and less effective. For such measures engender more and more the opposite of that for which they were intended, but in extreme and totally irrational, unpredictable forms.-- Back cover
All things valentine( Visual )

2 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 96 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A blogger who has had terrible luck on Valentine's days meets a handsome veterinarian. Then she finds out he is the one who has been leaving rude comments on her Valentines day articles and she questions if her luck has changed at all
The lost spirit of capitalism by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 78 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Max Weber famously argued that the rise of capitalism in early modern Europe was premised on the emergence of a distinctive set of attitudes - including the pursuit of profit for its own sake - which he called 'the spirit of capitalism'. Today, when capitalism has spread across the globe, the spirit of capitalism would appear to reign supreme. - In this important book Bernard Stiegler takes a very different view: what we are witnessing today is not the triumph of the spirit of capitalism but rather its demise, as our contemporary 'hyper-industrial' societies become increasingly uncontrollable, profoundly irrational and incapable of inspiring hope. Disenchantment and despair have become the everyday lived experiences of countless individuals. Far from being a moment of liberation, May '68 was just the first symptom of our increasing disenchantment and 'spiritual misery'. The libidinal energy that originally underpinned capitalism has become an unbound force, unleashing drives that can no longer be contained. - Is there an alternative? Stiegler argues that the development of alternatives must begin with a new industrial policy, designed to recognize that technologies are what Plato called pharmaka, meaning both poison and cure. Industrial society has a future only if we can create technologies that foster relations of care (otium) for people whose spirit has been exhausted by contemporary consumerism. We must develop an ecology not only to protect the planet but also to renew the exploited energies of human desire
States of shock : stupidity and knowledge in the twenty-first century by Bernard Stiegler( )

6 editions published in 2015 in English and held by 78 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The author argues that the industrial revolution has led to societies dominated by unreason, stupidity and madness. The result has been a capitalism that destroys desire and reason and in which every institution is undermined. Through a powerful critique of thinkers from Marx to Derrida, Stiegler develops new conceptual weapons to fight this destruction. He argues that schools and universities must themselves be transformed: new educational institutions must be developed both to take account of the dangers of digitization and the internet and to enable us to take advantage of the new opportunities they make available
The decadence of industrial democracies by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bernard Stiegler is one of the most original philosophers writing today about new technologies and their implications for social, political and personal life. Drawing on sources ranging from Plato and Marx to Freud, Heidegger and Derrida, he develops a highly original account of technology as grammatology, as a technics of writing that constitutes our experience of time, memory and desire, even of life itself. Society and our place within it are shaped by technical reproduction which can both expand and restrict the horizons and possibilities of human agency and experience. In the three volumes of Disbelief and Discredit Stiegler argues that this process of technical reproduction has become dangerously divorced from its role in the constitution of human experience. Radically challenging the optimistic view of new technologies as facilitators of learning and progress, he argues new marketing techniques shortcircuit thought and disenfranchise consumers, programming them to seek short-term gratification. These practices of "libidinal economics" have profound consequences for nature of human desire and they underpin the social and psychological malaise of contemporaty industrial society. In this opening volume Stiegler argues that the industrial model implemented since the beginning of the twentieth century has become obsolete, leading capitalist democracies to an impasse. A sign of this impasse and of the decadence to which it leads is the banalization of consumers who become ensnared in a perpetual cycle of consumption. This is the new proletarianization of the technologically infused, hyper-industrial capitalism of today. It produces a society cut off from its past and its future, stultifying human development and turning democracy into a farce in which disbelief and discredit inevitably arise. -- Publisher description
Mrs. Amworth( Visual )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Everyone is dying to meet their beautiful new neighbor. But soon after the mysterious young widow moves into the quiet, little town of Wilton, people start to die in bizarre and gruesome ways. The editor of the local paper and the town's stalwart physician team up to investigate the deaths which look to them to be the work of a vampire, but the trail of blood leads them in an unlikely direction-- toward the lovely, lusty Claire Amworth
For a new critique of political economy by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

5 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The catastrophic economic, social and political crisis of our time calls for a new and original critique of political economy - a rethinking of Marx's project in the very different conditions of twenty-first century capitalism. Stiegler argues that today the proletarian must be reconceptualized as the economic agent whose knowledge and memory are confiscated by machines. This new sense of the term proletarian is best understood by reference to Plato's critique of exteriorized memory. By bringing together Plato and Marx, Stiegler can show how a generalized proletarianization now encompasses not only the muscular system, as Marx saw it, but also the nervous system of the so-called creative workers in the information industries. The proletarians of the former are deprived of their practical know-how, whereas the latter are shorn of their theoretical practice, and both suffer from a confiscation of the very possibility of a genuine art of living. But the mechanisms at work in this new and accentuated form of proletarianization are the very mechanisms that may spur a reversal of the process. Such a reversal would imply a crucial distinction between one's life work, originating in otium (leisure devoted to the techniques of the self), and the job, consisting in a negotium (the negotiation and calculation, increasingly restricted to short-term expectations), leading to the necessity of a new conception of economic value. -- Publisher description
The lost spirit of capitalism by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Max Weber famously argued that the rise of capitalism in early modern Europe was premised on the emergence of a distinctive set of attitudes - including the pursuit of profit for its own sake - which he called & lsquo;the spirit of capitalism & rsquo;. Today, when capitalism has spread across the globe, the spirit of capitalism would appear to reign supreme. In this important book Bernard Stiegler takes a very different view: what we are witnessing today is not the triumph of the spirit of capitalism but rather its demise, as our contemporary & lsquo
The Neganthropocene by Bernard Stiegler( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the essays and lectures here titled Neganthropocene, Stiegler opens an entirely new front moving beyond the dead-end "banality" of the Anthropocene. Stiegler stakes out a battleplan to proceed beyond, indeed shrugging off, the fulfillment of nihilism that the era of climate chaos ushers in
Heidegger and the question of the political by Daniel Ross( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Optical properties of nanostructures and applications to surface-enhanced spectroscopy by Daniel Ross( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
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Violent democracy
Covers
Acting outDisbelief and discreditThe decadence of industrial democraciesFor a new critique of political economy
Alternative Names
Daniel Ross Australian film director

Daniel Ross philosophe et cinéaste australien

Daniel Ross taalkundige uit Australië

Ross, Daniel 1970-

Ross, Daniel Joseph

Ross, Daniel Joseph 1970-

دانييل روس

Languages
English (84)