WorldCat Identities

Johnson, David S.

Overview
Works: 3 works in 12 publications in 1 language and 75 library holdings
Classifications: HB1,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  David S Johnson Publications about David S Johnson
Publications by  David S Johnson Publications by David S Johnson
Most widely held works by David S Johnson
Household expenditure and the income tax rebates of 2001 by David S Johnson ( )
10 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Under the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001, most U.S. taxpayers received a tax rebate between July and September, 2001. The week in which the rebate was mailed was based on the second-to-last digit of the taxpayer's Social Security number, a digit that is effectively randomly assigned. Using special questions about the rebates added to the Consumer Expenditure Survey, we exploit this historically unique experiment to measure the change in consumption expenditures caused by receipt of the rebate and to test the Permanent Income Hypothesis and related models. We find that households spent about 20-40 percent of their rebates on non-durable goods during the three-month period in which their rebates were received, and roughly another third of their rebates during the subsequent three-month period. The implied effects on aggregate consumption demand are significant. The estimated responses are largest for households with relatively low liquid wealth and low income, consistent with liquidity constraints"--National Bureau of Economic Research web site
Identifying the poorest older Americans ( )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Household Expenditure and the Income Tax Rebates of 2001 by David S Johnson ( )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Under the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001, most U.S. taxpayers received a tax rebate between July and September, 2001. The week in which the rebate was mailed was based on the second-to-last digit of the taxpayer's Social Security number, a digit that is effectively randomly assigned. Using special questions about the rebates added to the Consumer Expenditure Survey, we exploit this historically unique experiment to measure the change in consumption expenditures caused by receipt of the rebate and to test the Permanent Income Hypothesis and related models. We find that households spent about 20-40 percent of their rebates on non-durable goods during the three-month period in which their rebates were received, and roughly another third of their rebates during the subsequent three-month period. The implied effects on aggregate consumption demand are significant. The estimated responses are largest for households with relatively low liquid wealth and low income, consistent with liquidity constraints
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
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Audience level: 0.92 (from 0.00 for Household ... to 0.93 for Household ...)
Languages
English (12)