WorldCat Identities

Jones, Seth G. 1972-

Overview
Works: 67 works in 238 publications in 1 language and 14,160 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Conference proceedings 
Roles: Editor
Classifications: DS119.76, 958.1047
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Seth G Jones Publications about Seth G Jones
Publications by  Seth G Jones Publications by Seth G Jones
Most widely held works by Seth G Jones
In the graveyard of empires : America's war in Afghanistan by Seth G Jones ( Book )
12 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and held by 1,706 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Following the September 11 attacks, the United States successfully overthrew the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. The U.S. established security throughout the country, killing, capturing, or scattering most of al Qa'ida's senior operatives, and Afghanistan finally began to emerge from more than two decades of struggle and conflict. But the author argues that as early as 2001, planning for the Iraq War siphoned resources and personnel, undermining the gains that had been made. He introduces us to key figures on both sides of the war. He then analyzes the insurgency from a historical and structural point of view, showing how a rising drug trade, poor security forces, and pervasive corruption undermined the Karzai government, while Americans abandoned a successful strategy, failed to provide the necessary support, and allowed a growing sanctuary for insurgents in Pakistan to catalyze the Taliban resurgence"--From book jacket
Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan by Seth G Jones ( )
14 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,420 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study explores the nature of the insurgency in Afghanistan, the key challenges and successes of the campaign, and the capabilities necessary to wage effective counterinsurgency operations. It argues that successful counterinsurgency requires effective indigenous security forces, especially police; a viable and legitimate local government; and the suppression of external support for insurgents
Building a successful Palestinian state security by Robert Edwards Hunter ( )
17 editions published between 2002 and 2007 in English and held by 1,364 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Throughout the history of Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, security has been the most important-and most challenging-issue for Palestinians, Israelis, and their neighbors. This study examines key external security issues that must be met for there to be a successful independent Palestinian state following a peace agreement with Israel. It makes proposals for an international (NATO-led) peace-enabling force, Palestinian security forces, and liaison and confidence-building cooperation between Palestine and Israel. This study also examines Palestinian policing, the nature of security arrangements along the Palestinian-Israeli border, counterterrorism efforts, intelligence functions, and broader Middle East security efforts. See also the companion volumes: The RAND Palestinian State Study Team, Building a Successful Palestinian State, Santa Monica, Calif.: The RAND Corporation, MG-146-DCR, 2005; Doug Suisman, Steven N. Simon, Glenn E. Robinson, C. Ross Anthony, and Michael Schoenbaum, The Arc: A Formal Structure for a Palestinian State, Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND Corporation, MG-327-GG, 2005
Establishing law and order after conflict by Seth G Jones ( )
15 editions published in 2005 in English and No Linguistic content and held by 1,320 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In a nation-building operation, outside states invest much of their resources in establishing and maintaining the host country's police, internal security forces, and justice system. This book examines post-Cold War reconstruction efforts, such as those in Iraq and Afghanistan, and assesses the success of U.S. and allied efforts in reconstructing internal security institutions
How terrorist groups end lessons for countering Al Qa'ida by Seth G Jones ( )
9 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,308 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
All terrorist groups eventually end. But how? Most modern groups have ended because they joined the political process or local police and intelligence agencies arrested or killed key members. This has significant implications for dealing with al Qa'ida and suggests fundamentally rethinking post-9/11 U.S. counterterrorism strategy: Policing and intelligence, not military force, should form the backbone of U.S. efforts against al Qa'ida
Counterinsurgency in Pakistan by Seth G Jones ( )
12 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 1,277 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document examines the evolution of militancy in Pakistan, assesses Pakistan's efforts to counter militants, and offers a range of policy recommendations. It is based on detailed research in Pakistan and an examination of the quantitative and qualitative literatures on counterinsurgency and counterterrorism
Securing tyrants or fostering reform? U.S. internal security assistance to repressive and transitioning regimes ( )
10 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 1,266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The United States has provided assistance to the security forces of a number of repressive states that do not share its political ideals. This practice raises several questions, the answers to which have significant policy implications: Has U.S. assistance improved the effectiveness of internal security forces in countering security threats? Has it improved the accountability and human rights records of these forces? What is the relationship between improving security and improving accountability and human rights? This study addresses these questions by examining the results of U.S. assistance to four states: El Salvador, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. U.S. assistance to El Salvador improved the accountability and human rights practices of the Salvadoran police but not their effectiveness as violent crime rates soared. In Uzbekistan, programs focused on counterproliferation, export control, and specific investigatory techniques were effective. But autocracy and repression by Uzbek officials, including security forces, have increased in recent years. Assistance to Afghanistan has somewhat improved the accountability and human rights practices of Afghan security forces. The vast majority of serious human rights abuses in the country are now committed by insurgent groups and warlords. In Pakistan, the U.S. government has not paid significant attention to the implications of its security assistance for the improvement of accountability and human rights, in large part because these goals have not been a focus of that assistance. Overall, these analyses suggest that efforts to improve the effectiveness, human rights, and accountability of internal security forces are more likely to be successful when states are transitioning from repressive to democratic systems. In addition, several factors are critical for success: the duration of assistance, viability of the justice system, and support and buy-in from the local government (including key ministries)
Afghanistan's local war building local defense forces by Seth G Jones ( )
12 editions published in 2010 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,220 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Security in Afghanistan has historically required a combination of top-down efforts from the central government and bottom-up efforts from local communities. Since 2001, U.S. and broader international efforts have focused on establishing security solely from the top down through Afghan national security forces and other central government institutions. But local security forces are a critical complement to these efforts, especially in rural areas of the country. The Afghan government and NATO forces need to move quickly to establish a more-effective bottom-up strategy to complement top-down efforts by better leveraging local communities. The Afghan government can work with existing community structures that oppose insurgents to establish village-level policing entities, such as arbakai and chalweshtai, with support from NATO. Effectively leveraging local communities should significantly improve counterinsurgency prospects and can facilitate mobilization of the population against insurgents. This analysis documents lessons about the viability of establishing local security in Afghanistan and addresses concerns about the wisdom of such policies
Securing health lessons from nation-building missions by Seth G Jones ( )
7 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 1,078 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Rebuilding public health and health care delivery systems has been an important component of nation-building efforts conducted after major conflicts. However, few studies have attempted to examine a comprehensive set of cases, compare the quantitative and qualitative results, and outline best practices. The study assesses seven cases of nation-building operations following major conflicts: Germany and Japan immediately after World War II; Somalia, Haiti, and Kosovo in the 1990s; and Afghanistan and Iraq since 2001. It concludes that two factors increase the likelihood of successful health outcomes: planning and coordination, and infrastructure and resources. In addition, the study argues that health can have an independent impact on broader political, economic, and security objectives during nation-building operations
Hunting in the shadows : the pursuit of Al Qa'ida since 9/11 by Seth G Jones ( Book )
5 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 796 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A former senior advisor at U.S. Special Operations Command recounts the history of the United States' ongoing battle against Al Qaida, describing investigations conducted by the combined efforts of the CIA, FBI, and MI5 and the shifting alliances between terrorist groups
The rise of European security cooperation by Seth G Jones ( Book )
18 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 435 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"One of the most striking developments in international politics today is the significant increase in security cooperation among European Union states. Seth Jones argues chat this increase in cooperation, in areas such as economic sanctions, weapons production and collaboration among military forces, has occurred because of the changing structure of the international and regional systems. Since the end of the Cold War, the international system has shifted from a bipolar to a unipolar structure characterized by US dominance. This has caused EU states to cooperate in the security realm to increase their ability to project power abroad and decrease reliance on the United States. Furthermore, European leaders in the early 1990s adopted a 'binding' strategy to ensure long-term peace on the continent, suggesting that security cooperation is caused by a desire to preserve peace in Europe whilst building power abroad."--Jacket
Reintegrating Afghan insurgents by Seth G Jones ( )
9 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 323 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Successful counterinsurgency requires getting insurgents to switch sides. Former insurgents provide an invaluable source of information on their previous colleagues, and can ultimately cause momentum to shift toward counterinsurgent forces. This document examines reintegrating mid- and low-level insurgents into their local communities in Afghanistan and outlines steps to facilitate that reintegration process. The author discusses the factors that increase the likelihood of reintegrating fighters and the key options for fighters as they consider reintegration. Finally, he outlines operational and tactical steps that should be taken when insurgents consider reintegration
Securing Afghanistan getting on track by C. Christine Fair ( )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This Working Paper examines the security environment in Afghanistan, assesses the programs put in place to address these threats, identifies existing gaps, and offers possible solutions
In the graveyard of empires [America's war in Afghanistan] by Seth G Jones ( Recording )
6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 166 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Following the September 11 attacks, the United States successfully overthrew the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. The U.S. established security throughout the country--killing, capturing, or scattering most of al Qa'ida's senior operatives--and Afghanistan finally began to emerge from more than two decades of struggle and conflict. But Jones argues that as early as 2001, planning for the Iraq War siphoned resources and personnel, undermining the gains that had been made. Jones introduces us to key figures on both sides of the war. He then analyzes the insurgency from a historical and structural point of view, showing how a rising drug trade, poor security forces, and pervasive corruption undermined the Karzai government, while Americans abandoned a successful strategy, failed to provide the necessary support, and allowed a growing sanctuary for insurgents in Pakistan to catalyze the Taliban resurgence
Measuring national power by Gregory F Treverton ( Book )
5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 142 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Reports the results of a two-day workshop that brought together a diverse group of modelers, specialists in international relations, and thinkers about power from both the public and the private sectors to consider how to measure state power and the power of non-state actors, and forms of "soft" power. On the first day, the group discussed state power on three levels: resources or capabilities, or power in being; (2) how that power is converted through national processes; (3) and power in outcomes, or which state prevails in particular circumstances. The second day focused on the changing state system. States now have more competitors-so called non-state actors. They range from terrorists and drug traffickers to advocacy groups, think tanks, and private corporations. Participants discussed how both states and non-state actors wield power on a continuum ranging from persuasion, through economic aid, to military action. The group's members agreed that their next steps should be to improve formulations and enhance models for forecasting power, and to develop scenarios as a means of adding vividness and exploring discontinuities
Women and nation building by Cheryl Benard ( )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study examines gender-specific impacts of conflict and post-conflict and the ways in which events in these contexts may affect women differently than they affect men. It analyzes the roles of women in the nation-building process and considers outcomes that might occur if current practices were modified. The recent nation-building activities in Afghanistan are used as a case study. Despite the difficulty of collecting data in conflict zones, the information available from Afghanistan provides several pragmatic points for consideration. Gender issues have been overtly on the table from the beginning of U.S. post-conflict involvement in Afghanistan, in part because of the Talibanâ‚‚s equally overt prior emphasis on gender issues as a defining quality of its regime. Also, the issue of women's inclusion is an official part of Afghanistan's development agenda, so all the active agents in the nation-building enterprise have made conscious choices and decisions that can be reviewed and their underlying logic evaluated. The monograph concludes with a broad set of analytic and policy recommendations. First, specific suggestions are made for improving the data-collection process. Then, three shifts in emphasis are recommended that could strengthen the prospects of stability and enhance the outcomes of nation-building programs: a more genuine emphasis on the broader concept of human security from the earliest phases of the nation-building effort; a focus on establishing governance based on principles of equity and consistent rule of law; and economic inclusion of women in the earliest stages of reconstruction activities
A stability police force for the United States justification and options for creating U.S. capabilities ( Book )
4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Establishing security is the sine qua non of stability operations, since it is a prerequisite for reconstruction and development. Security requires a mix of military and police forces to deal with a range of threats from insurgents to criminal organizations. This research examines the creation of a high-end police force, which we call a Stability Police Force (SPF). The study considers what size force is necessary, how responsive it needs to be, where in the government it might be located, what capabilities it should have, how it could be staffed, and its cost. This monograph also considers several options for locating this force within the U.S. government, including the U.S. Marshals Service, the U.S. Secret Service, the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) in the Department of State, and the U.S. Army's Military Police. The authors conclude that an SPF containing 6,000 people-created in the U.S. Marshals Service and staffed by a "hybrid option," in which SPF members are federal police officers seconded to federal, state, and local police agencies when not deployed-would be the most effective of the options considered. The SPF would be able to deploy in 30 days. The cost for this option would be $637.3 million annually, in FY2007 dollars
Europe's role in nation-building from the Balkans to the Congo by James Dobbins ( Book )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Two previous RAND volumes addressed the roles of the United States and the United Nations in nation-building, defined as the use of armed force in the aftermath of a conflict to promote a durable peace and representative government. This volume presents six case studies of recent European-led nation-building missions: Albania, Sierra Leone, Macedonia, Cote d'Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Bosnia. It also reviews the Australian assistance mission to the Solomon Islands. Using quantitative and qualitative measures to compare inputs (such military levels, economic assistance and duration) and outcomes (such as levels of security, economic growth, refugee return, and democracy), the analysis concludes that these European-led missions have been competently managed and, within their sometimes quite limited scope, generally successful. Most helped achieve sustained peace, gross domestic product growth, and representative government. The EU has a wide array of civil competencies for nation-building, but it is sometimes slow to deploy them in support of its military operations, particularly when these are conducted far from Europe. The UN offers the most cost-effective means to address most postconflict stabilization requirements and NATO the better framework for large-scale force projection in cases in which the United States is ready to participate. But the EU now offers European governments a viable alternative to both these organizations in cases in which European interests are high, U.S. interests are low, and the UN is, for some reason, unsuitable or unavailable
The UN's role in nation-building : from the Congo to Iraq by James Dobbins ( Book )
3 editions published between 2001 and 2005 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The first volume of this series dealt with the American experience with nation-building, defined therein as the use of armed force in the aftermath of a crisis to promote a transition to democracy. It examined eight instances in which the United States took the lead in such endeavors. This volume deals with the United Nations' experience with comparable operations, examining eight instances in which the United Nations led multinational forces toward generally similar ends. For the United States, post-Cold War nation-building had distant precursors in the American occupations of Germany and Japan in the aftermath of World War II and its role in fostering the emergence of democratic regimes there. For the United Nations, the comparable precursor was in the early 196Os in the newly independent Belgian Congo. The Republic of the Congo failed almost from the moment of its birth. Within days of the Congo's independence its army mutinied, the remaining white administrators fled, the administration and the economy collapsed, Belgian paratroops invaded, and the mineral-rich province of Katanga seceded. These developments cast a serious shadow over the prospects for the successful and peaceful completion of Africa's decolonization, at that point just gathering momentum. On July 14, 1960, acting with unusual speed, the Security Council passed the first of a series of resolutions authorizing the deployment of UN-led military forces to assist the Republic of the Congo in restoring order and, eventually, in suppressing the rebellion in Katanga
Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan : RAND counterinsurgency study by Seth G Jones ( Book )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study explores the nature of the insurgency in Afghanistan, the key challenges and successes of the U.S.-led counterinsurgency campaign, and the capabilities necessary to wage effective counterinsurgency operations. By examining the key lessons from all insurgencies since World War II, it finds that most policymakers repeatedly underestimate the importance of indigenous actors to counterinsurgency efforts. The U.S. should focus its resources on helping improve the capacity of the indigenous government and indigenous security forces to wage counterinsurgency. It has not always done this well. The U.S. military-along with U.S. civilian agencies and other coalition partners-is more likely to be successful in counterinsurgency warfare the more capable and legitimate the indigenous security forces (especially the police), the better the governance capacity of the local state, and the less external support that insurgents receive
 
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Alternative Names
Jones, Seth, 1972-
Jones, Seth G.
Languages
English (166)
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