WorldCat Identities

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen 1967-

Works: 3 works in 18 publications in 1 language and 3,161 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Author
Classifications: PS371, 813.5409
Publication Timeline
Most widely held works by Kathleen Fitzpatrick
The anxiety of obsolescence : the American novel in the age of television by Kathleen Fitzpatrick( Book )

7 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 642 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"It almost goes without saying that the rise in popularity of television has killed the audience for "serious" literature. This is such a given that reading Fitzpatrick's challenge to this notion can be very disconcerting, as she traces the ways in which a small cadre of writers of "serious" literature--DeLillo, Pynchon, and Franzen, for instance--have propagated this myth in order to set themselves up as the last bastions of good writing. Fitzpatrick first explores whether serious literature was ever as all-pervasive as critics of the television culture claim and then asks the obvious question: what, or who, exactly, are these guys defending good writing against? Fitzpatrick examines the ways in which the anxiety about the supposed death of the novel is built on a myth of the novel's past ubiquity and its present displacement by television. She explores the ways in which this myth plays out in and around contemporary fiction and how it serves as a kind of unacknowledged discourse about race, class, and gender. The declaration constructs a minority status for the "white male author" who needs protecting from television's largely female and increasingly non-white audience. The novel, then, is transformed from a primary means of communication into an ancient, almost forgotten, and thus, treasured form reserved for the well-educated and well-to-do, and the men who practice it are exalted as the practitioners of an almost lost art. Such positioning serves to further marginalize women writers and writers of color because it makes the novel, by definition, the preserve of the poor endangered white man. If the novel is only a product of a small group of white men, how can the contributions of women and writers of color be recognized? Instead, this positioning abandons women and people of color to television as a creative outlet, and in return, cedes television to them. Fitzpatrick argues that there's a level of unrecognized patronization in assuming that television serves no purpose but to provide dumb entertainment to bored women and others too stupid to understand novels. And, instead, she demonstrates the real positive effects of a televisual culture."--Publisher's website
Planned obsolescence : publishing, technology, and the future of the academy by Kathleen Fitzpatrick( Book )

10 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 617 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Academic institutions are facing a crisis in scholarly publishing at multiple levels: presses are stressed as never before, library budgets are squeezed, faculty are having difficulty publishing their work, and promotion and tenure committees are facing a range of new ways of working without a clear sense of how to understand and evaluate them. Planned Obsolescence is both a provocation to think more broadly about the academy's future and an argument for reconceiving that future in more communally-oriented ways. Facing these issues head-on, Kathleen Fitzpatrick focuses on the technological changes--especially greater utilization of internet publication technologies, including digital archives, social networking tools, and multimedia--necessary to allow academic publishing to thrive into the future. But she goes further, insisting that the key issues that must be addressed are social and institutional in origin. Springing from original research as well as Fitzpatrick's own hands-on experiments in new modes of scholarly communication through MediaCommons, the digital scholarly network she co-founded, Planned Obsolescence explores these aspects of scholarly work, as well as issues surrounding the preservation of digital scholarship and the place of publishing within the structure of the contemporary university. Written in an approachable style designed to bring administrators and scholars into a conversation, Planned Obsolescence explores both symptom and cure to ensure that scholarly communication will remain relevant in the digital future."--Provided by publisher
Closets ; and, Couple of three : a play and a screenplay by Kathleen Fitzpatrick( )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Audience Level
Audience Level
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.07 (from 0.06 for The anxiet ... to 0.59 for Closets ; ...)

The anxiety of obsolescence : the American novel in the age of television
Alternative Names
Kathleen Fitzpatrick American scholar of digital humanities

English (18)

Planned obsolescence : publishing, technology, and the future of the academy