WorldCat Identities

Bogost, Ian

Overview
Works: 28 works in 139 publications in 3 languages and 11,380 library holdings
Genres: History  Self-instruction  Video games 
Roles: Author, Author of introduction, Narrator, Interviewee, Editor
Classifications: GV1469.34.S52, 794.8
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Ian Bogost
Persuasive games : the expressive power of videogames by Ian Bogost( Book )

20 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 817 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Videogames are both an expressive medium and a persuasive medium; they represent how real and imagined systems work, and they invite players to interact with those systems and form judgments about them. In this innovative analysis, Ian Bogost examines the way videogames mount arguments and influence players. Drawing on the 2,500-year history of rhetoric, the study of persuasive expression, Bogost analyzes rhetoric's unique function in software in general and videogames in particular. The field of media studies already analyzes visual rhetoric, the art of using imagery and visual representation persuasively. Bogost argues that videogames, thanks to their basic representational mode of procedurality (rule-based representations and interactions), open a new domain for persuasion; they realize a new form of rhetoric."--Jacket
Play anything : the pleasure of limits, the uses of boredom, and the secret of games by Ian Bogost( Book )

5 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 632 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Life is boring: filled with meetings and traffic, errands and emails. Nothing we'd ever call fun. But what if we've gotten fun wrong? In Play Anything, visionary game designer and philosopher Ian Bogost shows how we can overcome our daily anxiety; transforming the boring, ordinary world around us into one of endless, playful possibilities. The key to this playful mindset lies in discovering the secret truth of fun and games. Play Anything, reveals that games appeal to us not because they are fun, but because they set limitations. Soccer wouldn't be soccer if it wasn't composed of two teams of eleven players using only their feet, heads, and torsos to get a ball into a goal; Tetris wouldn't be Tetris without falling pieces in characteristic shapes. Such rules seem needless, arbitrary, and difficult. Yet it is the limitations that make games enjoyable, just like it's the hard things in life that give it meaning. Play is what happens when we accept these limitations, narrow our focus, and, consequently, have fun. Which is also how to live a good life. Manipulating a soccer ball into a goal is no different than treating ordinary circumstances- like grocery shopping, lawn mowing, and making PowerPoints-as sources for meaning and joy. We can "play anything" by filling our days with attention and discipline, devotion and love for the world as it really is, beyond our desires and fears. Ranging from Internet culture to moral philosophy, ancient poetry to modern consumerism, Bogost shows us how today's chaotic world can only be tamed-and enjoyed-when we first impose boundaries on ourselves"--
How to do things with videogames by Ian Bogost( Book )

14 editions published between 2011 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 473 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"In recent years, computer games have moved from the margins of popular culture to its center. Reviews of new games and profiles of game designers now regularly appear in the New York Times and the New Yorker, and sales figures for games are reported alongside those of books, music, and movies. They are increasingly used for purposes other than entertainment, yet debates about videogames still fork along one of two paths: accusations of debasement through violence and isolation or defensive paeans to their potential as serious cultural works. In How to Do Things with Videogames, Ian Bogost contends that such generalizations obscure the limitless possibilities offered by the medium's ability to create complex simulated realities. Bogost, a leading scholar of videogames and an award-winning game designer, explores the many ways computer games are used today: documenting important historical and cultural events; educating both children and adults; promoting commercial products; and serving as platforms for art, pornography, exercise, relaxation, pranks, and politics. Examining these applications in a series of short, inviting, and provocative essays, he argues that together they make the medium broader, richer, and more relevant to a wider audience. Bogost concludes that as videogames become ever more enmeshed with contemporary life, the idea of gamers as social identities will become obsolete, giving rise to gaming by the masses. But until games are understood to have valid applications across the cultural spectrum, their true potential will remain unrealized. How to Do Things with Videogames offers a fresh starting point to more fully consider games' progress today and promise for the future"--Provided by publisher
Unit operations : an approach to videogame criticism by Ian Bogost( Book )

22 editions published between 2006 and 2008 in English and held by 401 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a critical approach that marries literary theory and information technology, reading digital and cultural artefacts - whether videogames, literature, or film - as configurative systems of interlocking units of meaning
Newsgames : journalism at play by Ian Bogost( Book )

17 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 396 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Journalism has embraced digital media in its struggle to survive. But most online journalism just translates existing practices to the Web: stories are written and edited as they are for print; video and audio features are produced as they would be for television and radio. The authors of Newsgames propose a new way of doing good journalism: videogames. Videogames are native to computers rather than a digitized form of prior media. Games simulate how things work by constructing interactive models; journalism as game involves more than just revisiting old forms of news production. The book describes newsgames that can persuade, inform, and titillate; make information interactive; re-create a historical event; put news content into a puzzle; teach journalism; and build a community. Wired magazine's game Cutthroat Capitalism, for example, explains the economics of Somali piracy by putting the player in command of a pirate ship, offering choices for hostage negotiation strategies. And Powerful Robot's game September 12th offers a model for a short, quickly produced, and widely distributed editorial newsgame. Videogames do not offer a panacea for the ills of contemporary news organizations. But if the industry embraces them as a viable method of doing journalism--not just an occasional treat for online readers--newsgames can make a valuable contribution
Racing the beam : the Atari Video computer system by Nick Montfort( Book )

13 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 394 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book offers a detailed and accessible study of this influential videogame console from both computational and cultural perspectives. Nick Montfort and Ian Bogost discuss the technical constraints and affordances of the system and track developments in programming, gameplay, interface, and aesthetics. --from publisher description
Alien phenomenology, or, What it's like to be a thing by Ian Bogost( Book )

13 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 317 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Humanity has sat at the center of philosophical thinking for too long. The recent advent of environmental philosophy and posthuman studies has widened our scope of inquiry to include ecosystems, animals, and artificial intelligence. Yet the vast majority of the stuff in our universe, and even in our lives, remains beyond serious philosophical concern. In Alien Phenomenology, or What It's Like to Be a Thing, Ian Bogost develops an object-oriented ontology that puts things at the center of being--a philosophy in which nothing exists any more or less than anything else, in which humans are elements but not the sole or even primary elements of philosophical interest. And unlinke experimental phenomenology or the philosophy of technology, Bogost's alien phenomenology takes for granted that all beings interact with and perceive one another. This experience, however, withdraws from human comprehension and becomes accessible only through a speculative philosophy based on metaphor
How to talk about videogames by Ian Bogost( Book )

8 editions published between 2015 and 2016 in English and held by 186 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Delving into popular, familiar games like Flappy Birds, Mirror's Edge, Mario Kart, Scribblenauts, Ms. Pac-Man, FarmVille, Candy Crush Saga, Bully, Medal of Honor, Madden NFL, and more, Ian Bogost posits that videogames are as much like appliances as they are like art and media. We don't watch or read games like we do films and novels and paintings, nor do we perform them like we might dance or play football or Frisbee. Rather, we do something in between with games. Games are devices we operate, so game critique is both serious cultural currency and self-parody. Nothing that the term game criticism once struck him as preposterous, Bogost observes that the idea, taken too seriously, risks balkanizing games writing from the rest of culture, severing it from the "rivers and fields" that sustain it. As essential as it is, he calls for its pursuit to unfold in this spirit: "God save us from a future of game critics, gnawing on scraps like the zombies that fester in our objects of study." [Source : 4e de couv.]
The geek's chihuahua : living with Apple by Ian Bogost( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 107 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The evolution and meaning of our love affair with Apple and its devices. The ubiquitous iPhone and its kin saturate our lives, changing everything from our communication to our posture. Ian Bogost contrasts the values of Apple's massive success in the twenty-first century with those of its rise in the twentieth."--Publisher's website
Play anything : the pleasure of limits, the uses of boredom, & the secret of games by Ian Bogost( Recording )

3 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 35 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Life is boring: filled with meetings and traffic, errands and emails. Nothing we'd ever call fun. But what if we've gotten fun wrong? In Play Anything, visionary game designer and philosopher Ian Bogost shows how we can overcome our daily anxiety; transforming the boring, ordinary world around us into one of endless, playful possibilities. The key to this playful mindset lies in discovering the secret truth of fun and games. Bogost reveals that games appeal to us not because they are fun, but because they set limitations
A SLOW YEAR : GAME POEMS by Ian Bogost( Book )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of four one kilobyte games for the Atari Video Computer System, one for each seasosn, about the experience of observing things. Neither action nor strategy, each game requires a different kind of sedate observation and methodical iput. Accompanying the game are essays about the commonalities between videogames and poetry and 1,024 machined haiku--poetry generated by computer--9 bits worth for each season."--Unedited summary from back cover
Elementary Greek by Christine Gatchell( Book )

in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jeu vidéo et discours violence, addiction, régulation( Book )

1 edition published in 2008 in French and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Elementary Greek : Koine for beginners : audio companion, year one by Christine Gatchell( Recording )

1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Provides a guide to pronouncing all of the letters, words, and phrases covered in the textbook, "Elementary Greek."
Persuasive games by Ian Bogost( Book )

3 editions published between 2007 and 2010 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is an exploration of the way videogames mount arguments and make expressive statements about the world that analyses their unique persuasive power in terms of their computational properties
Gry informacyjne ; dziennikarstwo epoki cyfrowej by Ian Bogost( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in Polish and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Post-continental voices : selected interviews by Paul John Ennis( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Inhuman nature by Ian Bogost( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in Undetermined and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Collection of essays examining the ways in which humanity is enmeshed in its surroundings
The state of play : creators and critics on video game culture by Ian Bogost( Book )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sixteen contributors including video game creators, media critics and Internet celebrities discuss the state and stakes of video game culture and describe how the digital world has collided with real-life art, sex, race and class politics. --Publisher information
Joystick soldiers : the politics of play in military video games by Ian Bogost( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

War has been an integral theme of the games industry since the invention of the first video game, "Spacewar!" in 1962. While war video games began as entertainment, military organizations soon saw their potential as combat simulation and recruitment tools. This anthology examines the reciprocal relationship between militarism and video games
 
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Audience level: 0.19 (from 0.06 for Newsgames ... to 0.98 for Gry inform ...)

Persuasive games : the expressive power of videogames
Alternative Names
Ian Bogost American artist

イアン・ボゴスト

漢堡神偷

Languages
English (123)

Polish (1)

French (1)

Covers
How to do things with videogamesUnit operations : an approach to videogame criticismNewsgames : journalism at playRacing the beam : the Atari Video computer systemA SLOW YEAR : GAME POEMSElementary GreekElementary Greek : Koine for beginners : audio companion, year onePersuasive gamesPost-continental voices : selected interviews