WorldCat Identities

Druckerman, Pamela

Overview
Works: 44 works in 182 publications in 13 languages and 5,632 library holdings
Genres: Biography  Humor  Autobiographies  Essays 
Roles: Author, Narrator
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Pamela Druckerman
 
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Most widely held works by Pamela Druckerman
Bringing up bébé : one American mother discovers the wisdom of French parenting by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

18 editions published between 2012 and 2017 in English and Dutch and held by 1,867 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The secret behind France's astonishingly well-behaved children. When American journalist Pamela Druckerman has a baby in Paris, she doesn't aspire to become a "French parent." French parenting isn't a known thing, like French fashion or French cheese. Even French parents themselves insist they aren't doing anything special. Yet, the French children Druckerman knows sleep through the night at two or three months old while those of her American friends take a year or more. French kids eat well-rounded meals that are more likely to include braised leeks than chicken nuggets. And while her American friends spend their visits resolving spats between their kids, her French friends sip coffee while the kids play. Motherhood itself is a whole different experience in France. There's no role model, as there is in America, for the harried new mom with no life of her own. French mothers assume that even good parents aren't at the constant service of their children and that there's no need to feel guilty about this. They have an easy, calm authority with their kids that Druckerman can only envy. Of course, French parenting wouldn't be worth talking about if it produced robotic, joyless children. In fact, French kids are just as boisterous, curious, and creative as Americans. They're just far better behaved and more in command of themselves. While some American toddlers are getting Mandarin tutors and preliteracy training, French kids are-by design-toddling around and discovering the world at their own pace. With a notebook stashed in her diaper bag, Druckerman-a former reporter for the Wall Street Journal sets out to learn the secrets to raising a society of good little sleepers, gourmet eaters, and reasonably relaxed parents. She discovers that French parents are extremely strict about some things and strikingly permissive about others. And she realizes that to be a different kind of parent, you don't just need a different parenting philosophy. You need a very different view of what a child actually is. While finding her own firm "non", Druckerman discovers that children-including her own-are capable of feats she'd never imagined."--Provided by publisher
Lust in translation : the rules of infidelity from Tokyo to Tennessee by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

13 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 657 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A strange and surprising journey around the world to examine how and why people cheat on their spouses. From Memphis to Moscow, people cheat on their spouses with astonishing frequency--but even illicit love has rules, and these rules differ radically from country to country. Acclaimed journalist Druckerman decided to investigate extramarital affairs all around the world to discover how different cultures deal with adultery--and her research leads her to believe that both the concept and the consequences of infidelity are far less rigid outside the United States. Americans, she decides, are the least adept at having affairs, have the most trouble enjoying them, and, in the end, suffer the most as a result of them. The rules of fidelity aren't as strict in many other parts of the world because many cultures acknowledge that adultery is an expected, if not acceptable, part of the marriage contract.--From publisher description
Bringing up bébé : one American mother discovers the wisdom of French parenting by Pamela Druckerman( Recording )

20 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 650 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

With a notebook stashed in her diaper bag, American journalist Pamela Druckerman sets out to learn the secrets to raising a society of good little sleepers, gourmet eaters, and reasonably relaxed parents. She discovers that French parents are extremely strict about some things and strikingly permissive about others. And she realizes that to be a different kind of parent, parents don't just need a different parenting philosophy, they need a very different view of what a child actually is
Bébé day by day : 100 keys to French parenting by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

8 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in 3 languages and held by 592 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

À la carte wisdom from the international bestseller. In Bringing Up Bébé, journalist and mother Pamela Druckerman investigated a society of good sleepers, gourmet eaters, and mostly calm parents. She set out to learn how the French achieve all this, while telling the story of her own young family in Paris. This book distills the lessons of Bringing Up Bébé into an easy-to-read guide for parents and caregivers. How do you teach your child patience? How do you get him to like broccoli? How do you encourage your baby to sleep through the night? How can you have a child and still have a life? Alongside these time-tested lessons of French parenting are favorite recipes straight from the menus of the Parisian crèche and winsome drawings by acclaimed French illustrator Margaux Motin.--From publisher description
French children don't throw food by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

19 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in 4 languages and held by 328 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

How do the French manage to raise well-behaved children and have a life! What British parent hasn't noticed, on visiting France, how well-behaved French children are - compared to our own? How come French babies sleep through the night? Why do French children happily eat what is put in front of them? How can French mums chat to their friends while their children play quietly? Why are French mums more likely to be seen in skinny jeans than tracksuit bottoms? Pamela Druckerman, who lives in Paris with three young children, has had years of observing her French friends and neighbours, and with wit and style, is ideally placed to teach us the basics of parenting a la francaise
French parents don't give in : practical tips for raising your child the French way by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

5 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In response to the enthusiastic reception of her bestselling parenting memoir "French Children Don't Throw Food", Pamela Druckerman now offers a practical handbook that distils her findings into one hundred short and straightforward tips to bring up your child a la francaise. It includes advice about pregnancy, feeding (including meal plans and recipes from Paris creches), sleeping, manners, and more
Over de grens by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

13 editions published between 2007 and 2014 in 8 languages and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Is what the French mean by infidelity the same as what Australians mean? Or the same as the Japanese, or the Finns? Do different countries have different rules when it comes to extramarital sex? Delving into this taboo subject, Pamela Druckerman interviewed people all over the world, from retirees in South Florida to Muslim polygamists in Indonesia; from Hasidic Jews to the men who keep their mistresses in a concubine village outside Hong Kong. She talked to psychologists, sex researchers, marriage counsellors, and, most of all, cheaters and the people they've cheated on. Russian husbands and wives don't believe that beach-resort flings violate their marital vows. Japanese businessmen declare, "If you pay, it's not cheating". And South Africans may be the masters of creative accounting - pollsters there had to create separate categories for men who cheat and men who cheat only when drunk. With all this bending of the boundaries of marriage, knowing that by international standards Australians are extremely faithful may come as comforting news. Or maybe not
French Parents Don't Give In : 100 parenting tips from Paris by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pamela Druckerman offers a practical handbook of helpful and fun short tips to bring up your child a la francaise, with advice about feeding (including meal plans and recipes from French creches), sleeping, dealing with tantrums and other bad behaviour, and more. Originally published: as Bebe day by day. New York: Penguin Press, 2013
Warum französische Kinder keine Nervensägen sind : Erziehungsgeheimnisse aus Paris by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

3 editions published between 2013 and 2015 in German and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Wei shen me Faguo ma ma ke yi you ya he ka fei, hai zi bu ku nao? : Faguo shi jiao yang, rang fu mu hao qing song, hai zi hao kuai le! by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

3 editions published in 2013 in Chinese and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Was französische Eltern besser machen : 100 verblüffende Erziehungstipps aus Paris by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

5 editions published between 2014 and 2018 in German and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Bébé made in France quels sont les secrets de notre éducation? by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

7 editions published between 2012 and 2015 in French and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The secret behind France's astonishingly well-behaved children. When American journalist Pamela Druckerman has a baby in Paris, she doesn't aspire to become a "French parent." French parenting isn't a known thing, like French fashion or French cheese. Even French parents themselves insist they aren't doing anything special. Yet, the French children Druckerman knows sleep through the night at two or three months old while those of her American friends take a year or more. French kids eat well-rounded meals that are more likely to include braised leeks than chicken nuggets. And while her American friends spend their visits resolving spats between their kids, her French friends sip coffee while the kids play. Motherhood itself is a whole different experience in France. There's no role model, as there is in America, for the harried new mom with no life of her own. French mothers assume that even good parents aren't at the constant service of their children and that there's no need to feel guilty about this. They have an easy, calm authority with their kids that Druckerman can only envy. Of course, French parenting wouldn't be worth talking about if it produced robotic, joyless children. In fact, French kids are just as boisterous, curious, and creative as Americans. They're just far better behaved and more in command of themselves. While some American toddlers are getting Mandarin tutors and preliteracy training, French kids are-by design-toddling around and discovering the world at their own pace. With a notebook stashed in her diaper bag, Druckerman-a former reporter for the Wall Street Journal sets out to learn the secrets to raising a society of good little sleepers, gourmet eaters, and reasonably relaxed parents. She discovers that French parents are extremely strict about some things and strikingly permissive about others. And she realizes that to be a different kind of parent, you don't just need a different parenting philosophy. You need a very different view of what a child actually is. While finding her own firm "non", Druckerman discovers that children-including her own-are capable of feats she'd never imagined."--Provided by the American publisher
Volwassenen bestaan niet en andere dingen die ik pas rond mijn veertigste begreep by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

1 edition published in 2018 in Dutch and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

P'ŭrangsŭ ai ch'ŏrŏm : ai ŏmma kajoki modu haengbokhan p'ŭrangsŭ sik yuka by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

2 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in Korean and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Faguo ma ma you ya jiao yang 100 zhao by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in Chinese and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

AÀ la carte wisdom from the international bestseller. In Bringing Up Bébé, journalist and mother Pamela Druckerman investigated a society of good sleepers, gourmet eaters, and mostly calm parents. She set out to learn how the French achieve all this, while telling the story of her own young family in Paris. This book distills the lessons of Bringing Up Bébé into an easy-to-read guide for parents and caregivers. How do you teach your child patience? How do you get him to like broccoli? How do you encourage your baby to sleep through the night? How can you have a child and still have a life? Alongside these time-tested lessons of French parenting are favorite recipes straight from the menus of the Parisian crèche and winsome drawings by acclaimed French illustrator Margaux Motin.--From publisher description
Il metodo maman by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in Italian and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There are no grown-ups : a midlife coming-of-age story by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

5 editions published between 2018 and 2019 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The best-selling author of BRINGING UP B?B? investigates life in her forties, and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face. When Pamela Druckerman turns 40, waiters start calling her "Madame," and she detects a new message in mens' gazes: I would sleep with her, but only if doing so required no effort whatsoever . Yet forty isn't even technically middle-aged anymore. And there are upsides: After a lifetime of being clueless, Druckerman can finally grasp the subtext of conversations, maintain (somewhat) healthy relationships and spot narcissists before they ruin her life. What are the modern forties? What do we know once we reach them? What makes someone a "grown-up" anyway? And why didn't anyone warn us that we'd get cellulite on our arms? Part frank memoir, part hilarious investigation of daily life, There Are No Grown-Ups diagnoses the in-between decade when ... Everyone you meet looks a little bit familiar. You're matter-of-fact about chin hair. You can no longer wear anything ironically. There's at least one sport your doctor forbids you to play. You become impatient while scrolling down to your year of birth. Your parents have stopped trying to change you. You don't want to be with the cool people anymore; you want to be with your people. You realize that everyone is winging it, some just do it more confidently. You know that it's ok if you don't like jazz. Internationally best-selling author and New York Times contributor Pamela Druckerman leads us on a quest for wisdom, self-knowledge and the right pair of pants. A witty dispatch from the front lines of the forties, THERE ARE NO GROWN-UPS is a (midlife) coming-of-age story?and a book for anyone trying to find their place in the world
P'ŭrangsŭ yugapŏp by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

2 editions published in 2014 in Korean and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

W Paryżu dzieci nie grymaszą by Pamela Druckerman( Book )

2 editions published in 2013 in Polish and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Den amerikanske journalist Pamela Druckerman undersøger og sammenligner fransk og amerikansk børneopdragelse ud fra holdningen at forældre i alle kulturer kan lære noget af hinanden
There are no grown-ups : a midlife coming-of-age story by Pamela Druckerman( )

3 editions published in 2018 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The best-selling author of BRINGING UP BeBe investigates life in her forties, and wonders whether her mind will ever catch up with her face. When Pamela Druckerman turns 40, waiters start calling her "Madame," and she detects a disturbing new message in mens' gazes: I would sleep with her, but only if doing so required no effort whatsoever. Yet forty isn't even technically middle-aged anymore. And after a lifetime of being clueless, Druckerman can finally grasp the subtext of conversations, maintain (somewhat) healthy relationships and spot narcissists before they ruin her life. What are the modern forties, and what do we know once we reach them' What makes someone a "grown-up" anyway' And why didn't anyone warn us that we'd get cellulite on our arms' Part frank memoir, part hilarious investigation of daily life, There Are No Grown-Ups diagnoses the in-between decade when... Everyone you meet looks a little bit familiar. You're matter-of-fact about chin hair. You can no longer wear anything ironically. There's at least one sport your doctor forbids you to play. You become impatient while scrolling down to your year of birth. Your parents have stopped trying to change you. You don't want to be with the cool people anymore; you want to be with your people. You realize that everyone is winging it, some just do it more confidently. You know that it's ok if you don't like jazz. Internationally best-selling author and New York Times contributor Pamela Druckerman leads us on a quest for wisdom, self-knowledge and the right pair of pants. A witty dispatch from the front lines of the forties, There Are No Grown-ups is a (midlife) coming-of-age story, and a book for anyone trying to find their place in the world
 
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Audience level: 0.28 (from 0.15 for Bringing u ... to 0.98 for Franska ba ...)

Bringing up bébé : one American mother discovers the wisdom of French parenting
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Lust in translation : the rules of infidelity from Tokyo to TennesseeFrench children don't throw foodOver de grens
Alternative Names
Drakermena, Pamela 1970-

Pamela Druckerman Amerikaans journaliste

Pamela Druckerman Journalist and writer

드러커맨, 파멜라

드러커멘, 파멜라

ドラッカーマン, パメラ

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