WorldCat Identities

Cullis-Suzuki, Severn

Overview
Works: 38 works in 59 publications in 3 languages and 1,430 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Documentary television programs  Nonfiction television programs  Environmental films  Biography  Folklore  Film adaptations 
Roles: Author, Host, Photographer, Editor
Classifications: PN1997, 791.4372
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Severn Cullis-Suzuki
 
Most widely held works by Severn Cullis-Suzuki
Notes from Canada's young activists : a generation stands up for change by Severn Cullis-Suzuki( )

9 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and held by 996 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this compilation, young citizens describe the moments they were inspired to pursue their passions to improve their world. Their methods and causes are diverse, and their stories highlight their innovative ways of identifying and addressing problems in society. The achievements here are impressive, from Craig Kielburger's founding of Free the Children to raise awareness of child labor to Lyndsay Poaps becoming the youngest elected official in Vancouver history. These stories counter the myth of youth as self-absorbed slackers, presenting a bracing new generation of activist leaders
Suzuki speaks( Visual )

4 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Suzuki is at his best. For more than 30 years, scientist, broadcaster and environmental activist David Suzuki has served as the host of The Nature of Things, a CBC program that is seen in more than forty nations. Suzuki Speaks is an hour of thought-provoking television. Earth. Air. Fire. Water. Life. David Suzuki delivers one of the most powerful messages of his career - the relationship between the four "sacred" elements and their influence on the "interconnectedness" we feel individually, with each other and with the rest of the world
Fraser River( Visual )

2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Part 1: Travels down the longest river in British Columbia, a river that has become a major economic corridor and is shared by a half dozen First Nations. Stó:lō chiefs and a Musqueam elder share their special relationship to this might river with some water stories. Part 2: A stunning visual scenery of the lower Fraser River, including water lilies, with a concise narrative in an artistic celebration of this mighty river
Water walk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Traces a spiritual water journey initiated by the determined actions of Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinaabe Elder and healer from Thunder Bay. In 2010, she embarked on a journey of four walks to bring four pails of water from the four oceans that surround North America to Lake Superior for a ceremony to raise awareness about the future of this valuable resource. This documentary follows Josephine and the water walkers on their longest journey, the Western Walk. From Puget Sound, Josephine and the water walkers begin their longest journey, the Western Walk. Their trek takes them through the Cascade Mountains and White Pass as they cross Washington state. Inspired by this action to raise consciousness about the importance of water and the need to protect it, local Indigenous people join them along the way."--Container
Anata ga sekai o kaeru hi : 12sai no shōjo ga kankyō samitto de katatta densetsu no supīchi by Severn Cullis-Suzuki( Book )

3 editions published in 2003 in Japanese and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

U turn by Oliver Stone( Visual )

2 editions published between 1995 and 2000 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Deals with environmental education by focussing on consumption reductions: solid waste reduction, eliminating houshold hazardous products, conserving water and energy, and improving air quality. It addresses the contradictory messages we receive from the media: simultaneously telling us to conserve and consume
Water walk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Traces a spiritual water journey initiated by the determined action of Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinaabe Elder and healer from Thunder Bay to raise awareness about the future of this valuable resource. Reflecting on a prophecy that by 2030 an ounce of water will cost the same as an ounce of gold, Josephine Mandamin decided to take some direct action. To raise awareness about the importance of water, she walked around the Great Lakes in 2003. In 2010, she expanded her mission, and embarked on a series of walks to bring four pails of water together from the four oceans that surround North America."--Container
Water walk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Traces a spiritual water journey initiated by the determined action of Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinaabe Elder and healer from Thunder Bay. In 2010, she embarked on a journey of four walks to bring four pails of water from the four oceans that surround North America to Lake Superior for a ceremony to raise awareness about the future of this valuable resource. After the BP Oil Disaster Josephine decided to include the Gulf of Mexico in her water journey, beginning the Southern Walk from Gulfport, Mississippi in April 2011. The water walkers brought water from the Mississipi River in exchange from what they would take from the gulf shore. Joined by many supporters along the way, everyone had a difficult time keeping up with this inspiring grandmother and Elder."--Container
Water walk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Traces a spiritual water journey initiated by the determined actions of Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinaabe Elder and healer from Thunder Bay. In 2010, she embarked on a journey of four walks to bring four pails of water from the four oceans that surround North America to Lake Superior for a ceremony to raise awareness about the future of this valuable resource. The Eastern Walk begins in the state of Maine. The Passamaquoddy people perform a traditional ceremony as a sendoff on this part of the journey. Josephine pays tribute to ancestors who began their ancient migration from this site, rich in petroglyphs. Taking a pail of water from the Atlantic Ocean, she and the water walkers head west. By now, the water walkers are gathering enough publicity that others, young and old, join in the walk."--Container
Water walk( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This film traces a spiritual water journey initiated by the determined action of Josephine Mandamin, an Anishinaabe Elder and healer from Thunder Bay. In 2010, she embarked on a journey of four walks to bring four pails of water from the four oceans that surround North America to Lake Superior for a ceremony to raise awareness about the future of this valuable resource. The final day of walking brings the four pails of water from the four oceans that surround North America to the Mide School near Bad River, Wisconsin. Local Indigenous people join the water walkers for the ceremonial pouring of water from the four oceans into Lake Superior. This completes their mission to raise consciousness that everyone in the world needs to respect water and work to protect it."--Container
Akwiten( Visual )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Akwiten follows the rebirth of the birch bark canoe, inspired by the emergence of an ancient Maliseet canoe from a European collection. Kim and Wayne Brooks, of St. Mary's First Nation in New Brunswick, are central figures here, with the launching of a replica of the 180-year-old Grandfather Akwiten canoe in the Wolostok River 2009". -- Container
Aurèle : chantons sous la pluie : exposition du 14 octobre au 3 décembre 2011, Galerie Lara Vincy, ... Paris, ...( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in French and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tending the meadows of the sea : traditional Kwakwaka'wakw harvesting of Ts'áts'ayem (Zostera marina L. ; Zosteraceae) by Severn Cullis-Suzuki( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Eelgrass, Zostera marina L. (Zosteraceae), is a flowering marine plant in coastal regions in the Northern hemisphere. Apart from its significance as habitat for a diversity of marine organisms, it has been a direct resource in European and American economies, and once was a food source for people along the Pacific Coast of North America. This interdisciplinary study documented protocols and specifics of the Kwakwaka'wakw ts'áts'ayem (eelgrass) harvesting tradition in British Columbia, and how their methods of harvesting affected the remaining plants' growth. Through interviewing 18 traditional eelgrass harvesters and participating in six harvesting sampling events, I documented the detailed protocols of the Kwakwaka'wakw eelgrass harvesting tradition. Based on the protocols of traditional ts'áts'ayem harvesting, I developed harvesting removal experiments in a dense Z. marina populations on Quadra Island (2005) and at Tsawwassen (2006) to examine the effects that traditional harvesting of eelgrass would have had on a shoot production and rhizome internode volume, within a growing season. At the Quadra site, a June treatment of between approximately 15 and 56% shoot removal corresponded with shoot regeneration above original numbers. An approximate 60% removal corresponded with the highest new shoot production after treatment, indicating the strong capacity of eelgrass meadows to promote new shoots after removal disturbance. Based on fieldwork with traditional knowledge holders, I estimate that traditionally harvesting would have been between 10-30% removal within areas the size of the experimental plots. Shoot regeneration, net shoot production and rhizome production results at the Quadra site supported the theory that a light amount of harvesting removal such that was conducted by Kwakwaka'wakw harvesters would have been within a level for full regeneration, and possibly even enhanced shoot population and rhizome production (measured by internode volume). Tsawwassen experiment treatment was applied too late in the season to show an effect of harvest, but the design provided efficient methodology for future experiments. Ecology literature substantiated many of the traditional eelgrass protocols documented in this study, strongly supporting the theory that eelgrass harvesting was a sustainable practice. Scientific literature about pollution also corroborated and explained the observations of elders on the state of today's eelgrass: few locations yielded ts'áts'ayem fit to eat, as specimens were small, had heavy epiphytic growth and dark rhizomes that Kwakwaka'wakw consultants had not seen in their youth. The combination of traditional ecological knowledge and scientific inquiry holds much potential for providing a better understanding of eelgrass ecology and dynamics, and for defining concepts of sustainability and conservation of this important resource
Ooligan( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Ooligan is a tiny fish also known as eulachon or candlefish. A traditional and staple source of food for Northwest Coast First Nations, this tiny fish is now threatened as a species. Once plentiful in over 30 river systems, the eulachon now returns to only three Canadian rivers and two in Alaska. Its loss can be tragic for the tribes that rely on the rich omega oils derived from rendering the fish. This documentary visits a "grease camp" in the Nass Valley and follows the "Dirty Dozen" as they render the fish oils for trade and consumption."--Container
Letter from Athabasca( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A visit to Fort McKay illustrates the astonishing effects from exploitation of one of the biggest deposits of oil in the world, the Tar Sands of northern Alberta. Mike and Marlene Orr of the Fort McKay First Nation explain the many changes: the infringement on their treaty rights, the impact on water resources and vegetation, and the rampant illnesses and rare cancers affecting people of all ages including the very young. They are joined by Maude Barlow who expresses strong concerns over the environmental impact of this project. George Poitras, who coined the word "bloody oil" at an international conference, reflects on the fact that although heavily invested by multinational corporations, neither the provincial nor federal governments have addressed the rampant public health and environmental effects of this megaproject."--Container
Wild rice( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This documentary is one of thirteen in Samaqan: Water stories, Series Two, continuing the exploration of water from the perspective of North America's Indigenous people. Water occupies a central role in culture and spirituality. For some Indigenous people in northern Saskatchewan, it also plays a central role in their economy. In the 1920's, wild rice was brought to the northern plains of Saskatchewan. Indigenous people were hired to grow it, and before long the Cree and Chippeweyan in the region became experts at growing the swampy grains. Wild Rice follows the Lac La Ronge Indian Bands who are currently among the world's top growers and exporters for this product."--Container
The Gulf story( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This documentary is one of thirteen in Samaqan: Water Stories, Series Two, continuing the exploration of water from the perspective of North America's Indigenous people. Through an examination of dangers posed by the energy sector, six programs in this series illustrate that in a sustainable world, oil and water do not mix. Derek Billiot is a Houma Native American and self-described "swamp man" who grew up on these waters and knows them like the back of his hand. During the first few days of the BP oil disaster in April 2010, he stood by, listened and watched daily reports of the attempts to cap the oil leak as his tour operations started shutting down, like all other business in the parish of Plaquemines. When the oil cleanup forces called, he went to work for a "Vessel of Opportunity." His first-hand account on what he witnesssed is quite different from what was presented in the mainstream media."--Container
The Gulf story( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This documentary is one of thirteen in Samaqan: Water Stories, Series Two, continuing the exploration of water from the perspective of North America's Indigenous people. Through an examination of dangers posed by the energy sector, six programs in this series illustrate that in a sustainable world, oil and water do not mix. It looks at what happened on that day of April 20, 2010 with the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. How did it affect the fishing industry and who has suffered the most? This in-depth view of the oil spill's impact on Native Americans along the Gulf coast has a special resonance for Canadians who face potential future impacts of resource development along their coast."--Container
The Gulf story( Visual )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This documentary is one of thirteen in Samaqan: Water Stories, Series Two, continuing the exploration of water from the perspective of North America's Indigenous people. Through an examination of dangers posed by the energy sector, six programs in this series illustrate that in a sustainable world, oil and water do not mix. It visits the Houma First Nation in Louisiana and the city of New Orleans where a chef comments on the impact the oil continues to have on seafood, a traditional staple for people in the area. The people in the bayous of Louisiana are a unique blend of French and African immigrants, along with the local Indigenous population. Often called Creole, their ancestors include Acadians expelled from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Proud of their culture and its cuisine, they were strongly affected by the Gulf Oil spill."--Container
Haida Gwaii( Visual )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Haida Gwaii goes to the northern archipelago on Canada's west coast where ecology, economy, culture and traditional knowledge all hold value. Subsistence harvesters, biologists and artists talk about the strategy of marine protection and the link between oceans and Haida art and culture". -- Container
 
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Notes from Canada's young activists : a generation stands up for change
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Alternative Names
Severn Cullis-Suzuki ahli biologi asal Kanada

Severn Cullis-Suzuki aktivis lingkungan Kanada

Severn Cullis-Suzuki attivista canadese

Severn Cullis-Suzuki Canadees televisiepresentatrice

Severn Suzuki kanadische Umweltaktivistin und Autorin

Suzuki, Severn Cullis-

Suzuki, Severn Cullis- 1979-

סוורן סוזוקי

سورن سوزوکی مجری تلویزیونی و نویسنده کانادایی

세번 스즈키

カリス=スズキ, セヴァン

セヴァン・カリス=スズキ

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