WorldCat Identities

Luke, Jessica J.

Overview
Works: 26 works in 33 publications in 1 language and 278 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Case studies  Interviews 
Roles: Author
Classifications: AM151, 069.5
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jessica J Luke
Practical evaluation guide : tools for museums and other informal educational settings by Judy Diamond( Book )

8 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 203 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Administrators of museums and other informal-learning centers often need to demonstrate, in some tangible way, the effectiveness of their institutions as teaching tools. Practical Evaluation Guide discusses specific methods for analyzing audience learning and behavior in museums, zoos, botanic gardens, nature centers, camps, and youth programs. This new edition incorporates the many advances in the burgeoning field of informal learning that have been made over the past decade. Practical Evaluation Guide serves as a basic, easy-to-follow guide for museum professionals and students who want to u
Rethinking parent engagement in children's learning( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evidences of learning in an art museum makerspace by Amy Oates( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

While makerspaces have gained momentum in recent years, some people are questioning the learning value of these hands-on spaces. This study investigated instances of learning observed in the context of an art museum makerspace, using a framework developed by researchers at the Exploratorium, San Francisco. Additionally, the study examined the efficacy of this framework for measuring learning in a makerspace outside of a science museum context. Twenty-five visitors were observed in the Maker Lounge at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA. Results show that visitors who participated in Maker Lounge activities evidenced a range of behaviors mapping to the Learning Dimensions Framework, largely similar to evidences of learning previously observed in a science center's makerspace. These results extend the conversation about learning within makerspaces, suggesting that learning can occur across varying makerspace contexts and calling for further research to examine the design, facilitation, and implementation of museum-based makerspaces
Interpreting incarceration : how historical prison museums are addressing the social aspects of criminal justice by Faithe McCreery( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We are living through an era entirely unprecedented in the field of criminal justice. Never before has an industrialized nation incarcerated its citizens to an extent matching that of the United States in the last three decades. Yet while many museum professionals champion the potential for museums to impact the social wellbeing of their visitors and of larger society, little is said in the literature about the practical implementation of this goal. The purpose of this study was to help bridge this gap between theory and practice, by describing the ways in which historical prison museums interpret the social aspects of incarceration. Data were collected through group interviews with staff, and content analysis of audio tours, at three historical prison museums that are recognized for their interpretation of social content. Study results suggest that interpretation of social issues requires both strong leadership and high-quality front-line staff; that the individuals who perform this work largely perceive the benefits of doing so as outweighing the risks; and that mission-enabling activities are an essential companion to mission-fulfilling ones
Long-term impacts of a museum school experience on science identity by Catherine J Scharon( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

While museum schools have proliferated over the past quarter century, little research has examined the outcomes of these formal-informal partnerships. This study investigated the long- term impacts of a museum school experience on alumni of Raisbeck Aviation High School and the Museum of Flight (Seattle) and Science Leadership Academy and The Franklin Institute (Philadelphia) using science identity as a theoretical lens. In retrospective interviews, alumni reported having and enacting a science identity and attributed several important indicators to memorable experiences at the museums. Participants placed particular value on the museums’ tangible learning experiences, real-world connections, and access to professional networks. These results support the learning value of intensive museum school partnerships and suggest potential directions for future research
Activist social work in small museums : a community-level exploration by Zachary A Stocks( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

While there is much dialogue around the potential for museums to engage in social work, there is little research on how museums practice social work at the community level. This study sought to explore the ways in which small museums engage in activist social work in their local communities. Data from three case studies inform how small museums can work to address local social problems. The research revealed four findings: 1) small museums see themselves as social work agents relative to the success of their social services; 2) small museums' social work is a collaborative and self-sustaining process; 3) small museums' social work is a mutual investment in the museum itself and the community; and 4) small museums assess successful social work through noticeable reductions in identified social problems as a result of their social service. An expanded understanding of small museums' social work provides new knowledge for museums of all sizes to use to help combat social problems in their communities
Emerging practices : early learning experiences in art museums by Julia Miller( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Museum professionals are calling on institutions to provide quality learning experiences for young children. However, research concerning how this can be accomplished in art museums is limited. This study sought to describe developing best practices of early childhood learning experiences in art museums. In particular, this research answered questions surrounding the reasons why art museums offer early learning experiences, what principles and practices guide their implementation, and what impacts they hope to achieve. This research used a descriptive case study design with five exemplary institutions. Methods included an online questionnaire, interviews, and document analysis. Using emergent coding, the researcher identified key themes. The results of this study suggest some preliminary hypotheses concerning possible best practices for early learning in art museums. Case studies suggest that a combination of internal and external factors serve as an impetus. Analysis also revealed possible best practices, as all case studies designed their programs to be learner-centered and family-focused, and utilized similar program elements to encourage cognitive and socio-emotional development in early learners. These philosophies informed one of the most important areas of impact: making the art museum into an accessible, family-friendly environment. These results provide key insights into the developing trends in best practices for art museum early learning experiences, and create a baseline of data to inform further research around these programs and their impact
Don't forget to play : examining what play looks like in museums for adult visitors by Maria Robinson( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

While play in museums for children is not a new concept, there is little research on what play looks like for the adult visitor. This study investigates adult play in museum exhibits designed for family learning, using Stuart Brown’s (2010) typology of play. Thirty visitors were observed between five exhibits at the City Museum, St. Louis MO and Science World, Vancouver B.C. Results showed that adults do play in these exhibits, and that they engage in various types of play, typically favoring body/movement play. These findings can be used by museums to understand how to create active opportunities to fully engage adult visitors
Creating discomfort : exploring the use of emotional immersive experiences to address social issues in museums by Jeanmarie G Hayes( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This study investigated current design practices used to engage visitors in emotional immersive experiences to address social issues in museums, particularly focusing on why a program or exhibit developer might use this interpretive method, concerns and challenges that arise from these experiences, and outcomes that these experiences are designed to achieve. Data were collected through one-on-one interviews with museum professionals from three different case study sites that utilize emotional immersive programming or exhibits. Study results suggest that emotional immersive programs allow visitors to engage with the material more deeply, make it more memorable, and can foster better understanding and empathy for others. Additionally, this study suggests that these programs can be too intense for visitors and care should be taken when developing them. Several themes that emerged in this study could be useful for museums looking to utilize emotional immersive programs in their institutions
Looking through glass : understanding visitor perceptions of visible storage methods in museums by Sena Dawes( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Museums today try to increase the public’s access to their collections in a variety of ways. Visible storage is one such popular method. However, there is little research done on what the public thinks about this kind of access. This study sought to understand visitor perceptions of visible storage methods in museums. Thirty visitors were interviewed in the Multiversity Gallery at the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver, BC. Results suggest that the majority of visitors understood the purpose of visible storage, and believe that it is very or extremely important for museums to provide access to their collections. While most visitors reacted positively to visible storage, many felt overwhelmed by the amount of objects in the space. Study findings have implications for continued conversations around what visitors expect from museums and what they are getting out of visible storage methods
Managing education collections : the care/use balance in natural history museums by Anna J Goss( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Although many natural history museums across the country manage education collections, not much literature exists on the level of care these collections receive and how institutions make decisions regarding this care. The purpose of this research study was to examine the standards of care for education collections at natural history museums. Using a descriptive case study approach, twelve museum professionals representing four large natural history museums were interviewed. Study results suggest that, while education collections are considered consumable collections, museums enact various levels of care to prolong the usefulness of these specimens and objects, including repair and preventative maintenance. Further, institutions critically consider what it means for objects to be a part of the education collection, in terms of possible damage to the object and potential benefits to learning in the museum. These results will provide a critical lens for museum professionals who use or care for education collections
Art museums, school visits and critical thinking : a case study of programmatic strategies by Beth A Smith( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This research study sought to describe the programmatic strategies used within art museum school field trips to facilitate the development of students' critical thinking skills. Data were collected using a case study approach, with interviews conducted with two members of each institution's education department. Key findings show all case study museums were motivated to focus on critical thinking out of a desire to be of value to schools, and to capitalize on the educational assets of their museum. There were similarities and differences in the strategies used for facilitating critical thinking. For example, all three cases used inquiry-based, gallery discussions to guide students through the practice of critical thinking, however the specific nature of their inquiry strategies differed. Overall, study results fill a gap in literature on programmatic strategies for impacting critical thinking skill development within school programs in art museums
Current science in museums and science centers by Pablo Martinez( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

People are faced with many science-related issues such as climate change, medical research, and new technologies, but often lack the basic science literacy or interest in understanding how these issues affect their lives. Museums and science centers are addressing this issue by interpreting current science research in their institutions. The purpose of this study was to examine how museums and science centers define and present current science to visitors. Museum professionals at seven museums and science centers were interviewed to understand how they define, interpret, and engage visitors with current science. Results suggest varying definitions of current science. Results also suggest participants use methods that allow for contact with scientists and staff and rapid changing exhibits. Participants have goals for greater visitor interest and engagement in current science after their visit. This research can be useful for museums or science centers looking to pursue or increase efforts in current science
Reframing parent involvement : the role of a museum program in connecting parents and schools by Jessica J Luke( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Art around the corner : an assessment of the long-term impact of an art museum program on students' interpretations of art by Jessica J Luke( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Leisure & practice : an exploratory study on the impact of leisurely museum visits on museum professionals by Taline Kuyumjian( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this exploratory research study was to understand how museum professionals experience being a visitor in museums and how their experiences may or may not influence their museum practice. Findings from this study were intended to start conversations about how professionals conceive the museum experience and the assumptions they bring to it based on their personal museum-going experiences. As a qualifier to participate in this research study, participants needed to have a leisurely museum visit scheduled, be a current museum employee and have at least five years paid experience working in museums. Data were collected through a two-part web-based reflective questionnaire administered to 25 individuals. Findings revealed that participating museum professionals are a unique visitor group which had a hard time separating leisurely visits to museums from their professional practice; experiences in both environments were continually contributing to and shaping the way the other was understood. Participants were not fully aware of the bias they brought to their practice from their leisurely visits. Further, affirmative experiences during leisurely visits and through subsequent conversations regarding the leisurely visit appeared to be of great personal value to the sample in regards to their professional confidence. Participating museum professionals thought deeply and critically about their leisurely museum visits, and took these experiences with them into their practice. This analysis on how museum professionals leisurely visit museums, how their practice is impacting their visits and how their visits are impacting their work serves as a foundation for further conversations surrounding this phenomenon
Analyzing visitor perceptions of personalization in art museum interactive technology by Gracie Loesser( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Although art museums are increasingly exploring the use of interactive technology to engage visitors, very little research has explored visitor perceptions of these technologies and the specific strategies employed through the technology to achieve increased engagement. This study investigates visitor perceptions of personalization strategies in art museum interactive technology, using interviews conducted with average museum visitors to understand their perceptions of technologies that attempt to make the visitor’s experience more personal and unique. Thirty-four visitors were interviewed in Gallery One at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Cleveland, Ohio. Results show that personalization did matter to museum visitors in the Gallery One space, but that despite the technology’s perceived value among visitors, most visitors did not engage with the personalization features. These results expand the available research on interactive technology in art museums, suggesting visitors value personalization features, and calling for further research into the difference between valuation and use
Big data development : a tool for interpreting institutional impact by Michelle Reichelt( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this research study is to understand how immediate and ongoing access to Big Data analytics, focused on museum visitors, influences the strategies used by development departments to communicate institutional value and impact. Through in-depth interviews, development professionals at the Dallas Museum of Art, the Grace Museum, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art, provided insight on the effect of Big Data on language and metrics, donor communication, and the donor relationship. Study results suggest that Big Data is providing development staff the means to collect behavioral data and interpret the engagement of visitors. Donor cultivation efforts are using this engagement data to target visitors more than ever before, through communications that focus on developing a lasting relationship rather than focusing on donor solicitations. The following results offer the field a baseline understanding of the impacts of Big Data while providing opportunities to explore further applications and understand long-term impact
Play on : the importance of adult-only play events at children's museums by Devon Kelley( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Play is an important part of an adult visitor’s museum experience. While recent research shows that adult visitors benefit from opportunities to play much like their younger counterparts, many museums are slow to incorporate play into their exhibits and programming for adults. Recognizing the benefit of play for visitors, some children’s museums are beginning to host adult-only events so older visitors can play with their exhibits and experience their programs. The purpose of this research is to examine adult-only play events at Madison Children’s Museum, Hands On Children’s Museum, and Children’s Museum of Phoenix to understand the museums’ motivation to host these events, the benefits to adult visitors, and how museums in general can incorporate opportunities to play for their adult audience members. Results indicate that these adult-only play events are being well-received by audiences, increasing attendance numbers, and attracting new audiences to the museums. Findings also show that these events are financially lucrative for the museum and could be adapted for use by many museum types
In principle, in practice : museums as learning institutions( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The science museum field has made tremendous advances in understanding museum learning, but little has been done to consolidate and synethesize these findings to encourage widespread improvements in practice. By clearly presenting the most current knowledge of museum learning, In Principle, In Practice aims to promote effective programs and exhibitions, identify promising approaches for future research, and develop strategies for implementing and sustaining connections between research and practice in the museum community
 
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Practical evaluation guide : tools for museums and other informal educational settings
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English (27)

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