WorldCat Identities

Luke, Jessica J.

Overview
Works: 36 works in 45 publications in 1 language and 298 library holdings
Genres: Academic theses  Case studies  Interviews  Tours 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jessica J Luke
Practical evaluation guide : tools for museums and other informal educational settings by Judy Diamond( Book )

9 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 206 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Administrators of museums and other informal-learning centers often need to demonstrate, in some tangible way, the effectiveness of their institutions as teaching tools. Practical Evaluation Guide discusses specific methods for analyzing audience learning and behavior in museums, zoos, botanic gardens, nature centers, camps, and youth programs. This new edition incorporates the many advances in the burgeoning field of informal learning that have been made over the past decade. Practical Evaluation Guide serves as a basic, easy-to-follow guide for museum professionals and students who want to u
Rethinking parent engagement in children's learning( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Reframing parent involvement the role of a museum program in connecting parents and schools by Jessica J Luke( Book )

2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Art around the corner : an assessment of the long-term impact of an art museum program on students' interpretations of art by Jessica J Luke( )

1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Gone haunting : exploring the use of mission-based ghost tours in historic house museums by Emily R Alvey( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Struggling historic house museums (HHMs) are in need of tailored, innovative programs to increase visitation rates and maintain financial solvency. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of mission-based ghost tours for revenue in various HHMs to determine guiding practices for this type of museum programming. In-depth interviews with museum professionals involved with creating and administering ghost tours, participant observations of the tours, and document analysis of promotional materials and internal reports provided insight into the logistical considerations, motivations, and ways of connecting ghost tours to mission from three HHMs. Study results suggested that ghost tour programs have the potential to be designed for museums of different sizes, and that they can be designed with multiple types of educational content. Additionally, this study suggested that ghost tour programs can be financially lucrative for HHMs, they can help sustain visitorship through reaching new audiences, and it is possible to ensure that ghost tours in HHMs are reflective of their educational mission. The results of this study offer house museum professionals some suggestions on designing and implementing their own ghost tours--one type of innovative programming
Evidences of learning in an art museum makerspace by Amy Oates( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

While makerspaces have gained momentum in recent years, some people are questioning the learning value of these hands-on spaces. This study investigated instances of learning observed in the context of an art museum makerspace, using a framework developed by researchers at the Exploratorium, San Francisco. Additionally, the study examined the efficacy of this framework for measuring learning in a makerspace outside of a science museum context. Twenty-five visitors were observed in the Maker Lounge at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA. Results show that visitors who participated in Maker Lounge activities evidenced a range of behaviors mapping to the Learning Dimensions Framework, largely similar to evidences of learning previously observed in a science center's makerspace. These results extend the conversation about learning within makerspaces, suggesting that learning can occur across varying makerspace contexts and calling for further research to examine the design, facilitation, and implementation of museum-based makerspaces
Play on : the importance of adult-only play events at children's museums by Devon Kelley( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Play is an important part of an adult visitor’s museum experience. While recent research shows that adult visitors benefit from opportunities to play much like their younger counterparts, many museums are slow to incorporate play into their exhibits and programming for adults. Recognizing the benefit of play for visitors, some children’s museums are beginning to host adult-only events so older visitors can play with their exhibits and experience their programs. The purpose of this research is to examine adult-only play events at Madison Children’s Museum, Hands On Children’s Museum, and Children’s Museum of Phoenix to understand the museums’ motivation to host these events, the benefits to adult visitors, and how museums in general can incorporate opportunities to play for their adult audience members. Results indicate that these adult-only play events are being well-received by audiences, increasing attendance numbers, and attracting new audiences to the museums. Findings also show that these events are financially lucrative for the museum and could be adapted for use by many museum types
Talking with tweets : an exploration of museums' use of twitter for two-way engagement by Sydney Jaramillo( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Past research has shown that although Twitter is an ideal platform for audience engagement, museums are not using it as such, and are instead using it almost solely as a promotional tool. This study aimed to understand the extent to which museums are using Twitter as a means to engage in two-way communication with their audiences. Through document analysis of 633 tweets from six museums and interviews with three museum professionals this study created a holistic understanding of museums' use of Twitter for two-way audience engagement. This research discovered that, although museums continue to use Twitter for promotions, they are also using it for audience engagement. This engagement comes down to having conversations with an audience. They are using Twitter as a place to share their audience's experiences, build connections with that audience, and share stories that their audience is interested in. If museums put in the effort to engage with their audience on Twitter, they may be able to better understand what their audience values and is interested in, as well as, how they think about the museum
Gateway to inclusion : understanding the structure of early open autism events in museums by Catherine Jean Allyn Salthouse( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The autism population is growing in the United States. Museums can be a resource to families with children with autism by hosting low-stimuli early open or late open events. The purpose of this research is to richly describe and examine the nature of museum-based autism events. document analysis and semi-structured interviews were conducted at three science-based museum sites on the west coast, gulf coast, and east coast. Results of this study show three distinct staff structures, varying levels of staff accessibility training, and different engagement strategies across sites. Common to all was the tendency to dismiss the effort necessary to get buy-in from all museum departments, the need for funding, and the idea of a champion within the museum to make an event possible. Perhaps due to the idea of a champion, museum staff did not think of other participating groups as partners. The implications of this study suggest the resources needed for these events can vary according to the needs and capacity of institutions
Emerging practices : early learning experiences in art museums by Julia Miller( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Museum professionals are calling on institutions to provide quality learning experiences for young children. However, research concerning how this can be accomplished in art museums is limited. This study sought to describe developing best practices of early childhood learning experiences in art museums. In particular, this research answered questions surrounding the reasons why art museums offer early learning experiences, what principles and practices guide their implementation, and what impacts they hope to achieve. This research used a descriptive case study design with five exemplary institutions. Methods included an online questionnaire, interviews, and document analysis. Using emergent coding, the researcher identified key themes. The results of this study suggest some preliminary hypotheses concerning possible best practices for early learning in art museums. Case studies suggest that a combination of internal and external factors serve as an impetus. Analysis also revealed possible best practices, as all case studies designed their programs to be learner-centered and family-focused, and utilized similar program elements to encourage cognitive and socio-emotional development in early learners. These philosophies informed one of the most important areas of impact: making the art museum into an accessible, family-friendly environment. These results provide key insights into the developing trends in best practices for art museum early learning experiences, and create a baseline of data to inform further research around these programs and their impact
Current science in museums and science centers by Pablo Martinez( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

People are faced with many science-related issues such as climate change, medical research, and new technologies, but often lack the basic science literacy or interest in understanding how these issues affect their lives. Museums and science centers are addressing this issue by interpreting current science research in their institutions. The purpose of this study was to examine how museums and science centers define and present current science to visitors. Museum professionals at seven museums and science centers were interviewed to understand how they define, interpret, and engage visitors with current science. Results suggest varying definitions of current science. Results also suggest participants use methods that allow for contact with scientists and staff and rapid changing exhibits. Participants have goals for greater visitor interest and engagement in current science after their visit. This research can be useful for museums or science centers looking to pursue or increase efforts in current science
Leisure & practice : an exploratory study on the impact of leisurely museum visits on museum professionals by Taline A Kuyumjian( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this exploratory research study was to understand how museum professionals experience being a visitor in museums and how their experiences may or may not influence their museum practice. Findings from this study were intended to start conversations about how professionals conceive the museum experience and the assumptions they bring to it based on their personal museum-going experiences. As a qualifier to participate in this research study, participants needed to have a leisurely museum visit scheduled, be a current museum employee and have at least five years paid experience working in museums. Data were collected through a two-part web-based reflective questionnaire administered to 25 individuals. Findings revealed that participating museum professionals are a unique visitor group which had a hard time separating leisurely visits to museums from their professional practice; experiences in both environments were continually contributing to and shaping the way the other was understood. Participants were not fully aware of the bias they brought to their practice from their leisurely visits. Further, affirmative experiences during leisurely visits and through subsequent conversations regarding the leisurely visit appeared to be of great personal value to the sample in regards to their professional confidence. Participating museum professionals thought deeply and critically about their leisurely museum visits, and took these experiences with them into their practice. This analysis on how museum professionals leisurely visit museums, how their practice is impacting their visits and how their visits are impacting their work serves as a foundation for further conversations surrounding this phenomenon
Exploring sculpture conservation in Seattle by Margaret Burlingame Greutert( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Contemporary public sculptures in Seattle, at a glance, look everlasting, but they are difficult to maintain given material, environmental, social, and funding challenges. To make matters more complicated, they are also managed by different organizations--government, private, and public museums. At some point, these organizations will need to make maintenance and conservation decisions which will affect the future of sculpture in the area. This case study examines the conservation practices and philosophies of six Seattle art organizations representing government, private, and public museum collections. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven museum professionals. Results suggest that each type of art organization faces different circumstances that affect how they maintain their sculptures and they are starting to implement new conservation practices to maximize fixed resources. This study addresses a need to start examining organizational sculpture conservation practices and create a foundation to examine other aspects of public art conservation
The Role of Evaluation in Reimagining the Art Museum( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract : In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. The purpose of our article is to critically examine the role of evaluation in CMA's reinvention, and in particular to highlight three features of evaluation at CMA that we believe contributed to the museum's transformation: (1) the role of the evaluator; (2) thinking evaluatively; and (3) changing institutional culture by leading from one department
Don't forget to play : examining what play looks like in museums for adult visitors by Maria Robinson( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

While play in museums for children is not a new concept, there is little research on what play looks like for the adult visitor. This study investigates adult play in museum exhibits designed for family learning, using Stuart Brown's (2010) typology of play. Thirty visitors were observed between five exhibits at the City Museum, St. Louis MO and Science World, Vancouver B.C. Results showed that adults do play in these exhibits, and that they engage in various types of play, typically favoring body/movement play. These findings can be used by museums to understand how to create active opportunities to fully engage adult visitors
Analyzing visitor perceptions of personalization in art museum interactive technology by Gracie Loesser( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Although art museums are increasingly exploring the use of interactive technology to engage visitors, very little research has explored visitor perceptions of these technologies and the specific strategies employed through the technology to achieve increased engagement. This study investigates visitor perceptions of personalization strategies in art museum interactive technology, using interviews conducted with average museum visitors to understand their perceptions of technologies that attempt to make the visitor’s experience more personal and unique. Thirty-four visitors were interviewed in Gallery One at the Cleveland Museum of Art in Cleveland, Ohio. Results show that personalization did matter to museum visitors in the Gallery One space, but that despite the technology’s perceived value among visitors, most visitors did not engage with the personalization features. These results expand the available research on interactive technology in art museums, suggesting visitors value personalization features, and calling for further research into the difference between valuation and use
Art museums, school visits and critical thinking : a case study of programmatic strategies by Beth A Smith( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This research study sought to describe the programmatic strategies used within art museum school field trips to facilitate the development of students' critical thinking skills. Data were collected using a case study approach, with interviews conducted with two members of each institution's education department. Key findings show all case study museums were motivated to focus on critical thinking out of a desire to be of value to schools, and to capitalize on the educational assets of their museum. There were similarities and differences in the strategies used for facilitating critical thinking. For example, all three cases used inquiry-based, gallery discussions to guide students through the practice of critical thinking, however the specific nature of their inquiry strategies differed. Overall, study results fill a gap in literature on programmatic strategies for impacting critical thinking skill development within school programs in art museums
Interpreting incarceration : how historical prison museums are addressing the social aspects of criminal justice by Faithe McCreery( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

We are living through an era entirely unprecedented in the field of criminal justice. Never before has an industrialized nation incarcerated its citizens to an extent matching that of the United States in the last three decades. Yet while many museum professionals champion the potential for museums to impact the social wellbeing of their visitors and of larger society, little is said in the literature about the practical implementation of this goal. The purpose of this study was to help bridge this gap between theory and practice, by describing the ways in which historical prison museums interpret the social aspects of incarceration. Data were collected through group interviews with staff, and content analysis of audio tours, at three historical prison museums that are recognized for their interpretation of social content. Study results suggest that interpretation of social issues requires both strong leadership and high-quality front-line staff; that the individuals who perform this work largely perceive the benefits of doing so as outweighing the risks; and that mission-enabling activities are an essential companion to mission-fulfilling ones
Adopt-an-object : reaching donors through personalized fundraising by Stefanie Mueller Terasaki( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The purpose of this research study was to understand museums' use of adopt-an-object (AO) fundraising and their effects on donor base. The study focused on the rationale for implementing the campaign, the nature of the campaign, the museum's perceived impacts of this campaign on donor base growth and the change in the museum-donor relationship. Using a case study design, data were collected from 4 institutions through a questionnaire and interviews. Findings suggest that museums implemented their campaigns to meet the funding needs of collection object's conservation and artifact acquisition, and to create a connection between the public and museum objects. While some museums experienced an increase in donors through AO others have used it to work closer with already established museum supporters. Advantages of AO include reaching new donors, providing tangible items in exchange for funds, and creating a more personal museum-donor relationship. These results offer the field an understanding of AO as a more personalized form of fundraising and highlight other opportunities to understand the long-term impact of its use
In principle, in practice : museums as learning institutions( )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The science museum field has made tremendous advances in understanding museum learning, but little has been done to consolidate and synethesize these findings to encourage widespread improvements in practice. By clearly presenting the most current knowledge of museum learning, In Principle, In Practice aims to promote effective programs and exhibitions, identify promising approaches for future research, and develop strategies for implementing and sustaining connections between research and practice in the museum community
 
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Practical evaluation guide : tools for museums and other informal educational settings
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English (29)

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