WorldCat Identities
Fri Mar 21 17:13:58 2014 UTClccn-n500361340.00Drug Research in Academic Laboratories and the Pharmaceutical Industry. (Summary of an address given to the Royal Society of Arts.)0.381.00Report on the correspondence and papers of Sir Ernst Boris Chain, 1906-1979, biochemist /74723612Ernst_Boris_Chainn 5003613471399Chain, E. 1906-1979Chain, Ernst, 1906-1979Chain, Ernst B. 1906-1979Chain, Ernst B. (Ernst Boris), 1906-1979Chain, Ernst Boris 1906-1979 Vollstaendiger NameChain, Ernst Boris, Sir, 1906-Chain, Ernst, Sir, 1906-إرنست تشاين، 1906-1979lccn-n83312471Florey, HowardBaron Florey1898-1968lccn-n86097364Heatley, Norman George1911-lccn-n82005076Lax, Ericlccn-n80007730Clark, Ronald Williamlccn-n81102624Hems, D. A.edtnp-jennings, m aJennings, M. A.viaf-211258176Florey, M. E.lccn-n80164687Abraham, E. P.(Edward Penley)1913-1999lccn-n82117050Sanders, A. G.(Albert Godfrey)1885-lccn-n83228021Fleming, Alexander1881-1955Chain, Ernst Boris1906-1979Conference proceedingsChain, Ernst Boris,PenicillinBiochemistsFlorey, Howard,--Baron Florey,Heatley, Norman George,BacteriologistsPhysiciansAntibioticsGermanyGreat BritainMicrobial metabolitesFleming, Alexander,MedicineEngland--OxfordFood industry and tradeWeight lossScience and stateScience and civilizationAustraliaNutritionReducing diets--Study and teachingPathologistsPenicilliumScientistsDiscoveries in scienceAntibacterial agentsDrugs--Research--FinanceMedical scientistsMedical scientists--BiographyLettersContemporary Medical Archives CentreMedicine--ResearchManuscriptsTréfouël, JacquesMetabolismChromatographic analysisBacteriaImmunityWaksman, Selman A.--(Selman Abraham),190619791932193319401944194519481949195019531954195619571958196319641965196919701971197519771979198319851986198919911992199419971998200220032004200520062009201128556391574.192QP981.A56ocn310702351ocn174719735ocn6918586912534ocn002968213book19770.84Biologically active substances--exploration and exploitationConference proceedings2092ocn014646628book19490.86Florey, H. WAntibiotics : a survey of penicillin, streptomycin, and other antimicrobial substances from fungi, actinomycetes, bacteria, and plants681ocn002524182book19750.76Food technology in the 1980s : a Royal Society discussionConference proceedings393ocn000137936book19700.86Chain, Ernst BorisSocial responsibility and the scientist in modern western society192ocn014531245book19640.86Chain, Ernst BorisLandmarks and persectives in biochemical research135ocn050971208book19320.93Chain, Ernst BorisEnzymatische Esterbildung und Esterspaltung81ocn029526498book19630.84Chain, Ernst BorisAcademic and industrial contributions to drug research71ocn310702351book19770.47Biologically active substances - exploration and exploitation : papers presented at a symposium held at the Royal Society, London, in June, 1976, to honor Sir Ernst Chain41ocn029442570book19710.47Chain, Ernst BorisA discussion on penicillin and related antibiotics: past, present and future42ocn003834174book19400.92Chain, Ernst BorisPenicillin as a chemotherapeutic agent42ocn030279956book19640.47Chain, Ernst BorisLandmarks and perspectives in biochemical research : inaugural lecture, 12 May 196431ocn068079706book19750.47A discussion on food technology in the 1980s34ocn774485859book1963Chain, Ernst BorisDrug Research in Academic Laboratories and the Pharmaceutical Industry. (Summary of an address given to the Royal Society of Arts.)22ocn690237067book19450.86Florey, HowardThe Development of penicillin in medicine21ocn174719735book19530.47Metabolism microbico22ocn638736807book19500.76Hauduroy, PaulBacilles tuberculeux et paratuberculeux, bactériologie, chimie, antibiotiques, chimiothérapieTuberkelbakterien21ocn476328511book19490.10Antibiotics : A survey of penicillin, streptomycin, and other antimicrobial substances from fungi, actinomycetes, bacteria, and plants. Vol. 1-211ocn316528933book19571.00Dubos, René JLa cellula batterica : in relazione coi problemi della virulenza, dell'immunità e della chemioterapia11ocn224870829book19441.00Chain, Ernst BorisPenicillin11ocn019425478book19561.00Istituto superiore di sanità (Italy)Selected scientific papers13141ocn052727654book20040.22Lax, EricThe mold in Dr. Florey's coat : the story of the penicillin miracleHistoryBiographyPopular works"Admirable, superbly researched ... perhaps the most exciting tale of science since the apple dropped on Newton's head."--Simon Winchester, The New York Times. Alexander Fleming's discovery of penicillin in his London laboratory in 1928 and its eventual development as the first antibiotic by a team at Oxford University headed by Howard Florey and Ernst Chain in 1942 led to the introduction of the most important family of drugs of the twentieth century. Yet credit for penicillin is largely misplaced. Neither Fleming nor Florey and his associates ever made real money from their achievements; instead it was the American labs that won patents on penicillin's manufacture and drew royalties from its sale. Why this happened, why it took fourteen years to develop penicillin, and how it was finally done is a fascinating story of quirky individuals, missed opportunities, medical prejudice, brilliant science, shoestring research, wartime pressures, misplaced modesty, conflicts between mentors and their proteges, and the passage of medicine from one era to the next+-+15421505355715ocn012970320book19850.28Clark, RonaldThe life of Ernst Chain : penicillin and beyondHistoryBiography2122ocn054974081book20040.22Lax, EricThe mould in Dr Florey's coat : the remarkable true story of the penicillin miracleHistory+-+2074031685324403ocn501843241visu20090.4710 things you need to know about losing weightPresents 10 science-based approaches to losing weight without starving as volunteers put the theories to the test191ocn039236268visu19980.63Penicillin discovering the truthHistory(Producer) Although Alexander Fleming is usually credited with the discovery of penicillin in 1928, no penicillin-based antibiotic was actually developed for human use until 1938 through the work of Austrian pathologist Howard Florey and German biochemist Ernst Chain. This program puts Fleming's contribution in scientific perspective. Live interviews, journal accounts, and archival footage lead the viewer through the discovery of the drug from a by-product of the tiny fungus, Penicillium notatum. The roles played by luck, politics, and society both in scientific research and bestowing credit for the discovery are explored. A BBC Production. Original BBC broadcast title: The Mold, the Myth and the Microbe93ocn026019692visu19890.06Fleming--the discovery of penicillinHistoryJuvenile worksBiographyUsing animation, profiles Alexander Fleming, Ernst Chain, and Howard Florey, who made the use of penicillin possible. Shows how the development of penicillin revolutionized modern medicine91ocn035227612visu19910.08The mold, the myth and the microbeHistoryBiographyExplores the discovery of penicillin and Fleming's overstated credit with it's development as a wonder drug. Brings to light the roles luck, politics and timing play in scientific discoveries and examines the difference between discovery and application41ocn014512465visu19860.47Dugan, DavidThe Rise of a wonder drugHistoryChronicles the history of penicillin from Fleming's discovery to experiments by Florey and Chain that resulted in the first clinical trial of penicillin21ocn221949380book19940.47Kennedy-Perkins, MichaelChain and ableHistoryBiography21ocn271061871visu20060.19Jager, ClairePenicillin the magic bulletHistoryBiography"In the late 1920s, a Scot named Alexander Fleming chanced upon a mould called penicillium. He conducted a series of laboratory tests and discovered that the mould could kill bacteria. Although the mould seemed to have medical possibilities, Fleming was unable to isolate the active substance. Ten years later, at the outbreak of the Second World War, Howard Florey, an Australian working at the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology in Oxford, found Fleming's article21ocn022953780book19831.00Alton, JeannineReport on the correspondence and papers of Sir Ernst Boris Chain, 1906-1979, biochemistBibliography CatalogsCatalogs21ocn068169362visu19970.47Alexander Fleming, Howard Florey, Ernst Chain en penicillineOfschoon penicilline reeds in 1928 werd ontdekt, kwam het pas gedurende de Tweede Wereldoorlog in productie. het antibioticum penicilline is nog steeds van grote betekenis bij de strijd tegen infecties11ocn048767554fileErnst Boris Chain--BiographyThe Nobel Foundation presents a biographical sketch of British biochemist Ernst Boris Chain (1906-1979). Chain received the 1945 Nobel prize in physiology or medicine, along with Alexander Fleming and Howard Walter Florey, for the discovery of penicillin and its effect in various infectious diseases. The foundation highlights his career, education, and his work12ocn005894770visu19791.00Discovery--penicillinHistoryTraces the development of penicillin from its initial discovery through modern day usage, using animation and live action. Focuses on British scientists Alexander Fleming, E.B. Chain, and Howard Florey, who shared in the discovery and development of this antibiotic11ocn083067343visu20060.47Penicillin discovering the truthHistoryAlthough Alexander Fleming is usually credited with the discovery of penicillin in 1928, no penicillin-based antibiotic was actually developed for human use until 1938 through the work of Austrian pathologist Howard Florey and German biochemist Ernst Chain. This program puts Fleming's contribution in scientific perspective. Live interviews, journal accounts, and archival footage lead the viewer through the discovery of the drug from a by-product of the tiny fungus, Penicillium notatum. The roles played by luck, politics, and society both in scientific research and bestowing credit for the discovery are explored. A BBC Production. Original BBC broadcast title: The Mold, the Myth and the Microbe11ocn046703584fileScience Odyssey: People and Discoveries: Ernst ChainThe Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) and the WGBH Educational Foundation offer a biographical sketch of British biochemist Ernst Chain (1906-1979). Together with Alexander Fleming and Howard Florey, Chain found that penicillin was not an enzyme and worked to develop penicillin11ocn071167979file2002Acuna Leiva, GuillermoDescubrimiento de la penicilina: un hito de la medicina como el azar puede ayudar al cientifico11ocn779622040visuSeven of the early researchers on penicillin. Photograph, 194- (?)(Back row, left to right) S. Waksman, H. Florey, J. Trefouel, E. Chain, A. Gratia, (front row left to right) P.(?) Fredericq and Maurice Welsch. Taken by unknown photographer at Oxford11ocn779760316visu1964The discovery of penicillinA government produced film about the discovery of Penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming, and the continuing development of its use as an antibiotic. British Industrial Film Association National Award, 1964; a First Prize, Fifth International Industrial Film Festival, London, 1964; a Diploma of Merit, Melbourne International Film Festival, 196411ocn779620330visuDerek Rowe LtdErnst Boris Chain and Fred Wrigley. Photograph by Derek Rowe LtdWrigley was a pharmacist and physician who worked for the pharmaceutical companies Roche, Ciba and Wellcome Foundation (of the last of which he became deputy chairman). Chain was one of the co-discoverers of penicillin+-+1542150535Fri Mar 21 15:15:52 EDT 2014batch21539