WorldCat Identities

Wevers, John William

Overview
Works: 115 works in 475 publications in 7 languages and 10,008 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Commentaries  Bibliography  History 
Roles: Author, Editor, Honoree, Other, Contributor, Commentator
Classifications: BS744, 221.48 S
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about John William Wevers
 
Most widely held works by John William Wevers
Ezekiel by John William Wevers( Book )

33 editions published between 1969 and 1982 in English and held by 649 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Essays on the ancient Semitic world by John William Wevers( Book )

14 editions published between 1970 and 1993 in English and held by 490 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Studies on the ancient Palestinian world : presented to Professor F.V. Winnett on the occasion of his retirement 1 July 1971 by John William Wevers( Book )

13 editions published in 1972 in English and Undetermined and held by 470 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The world of the Aramaeans by P. M. Michèle Daviau( Book )

52 editions published in 2001 in 3 languages and held by 327 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The World of the Aramaeans is a three-volume collection of definitive essays about the Aramaeans and the biblical world of which they were a part. Areas of interest include the language, epigraphy and history of the Aramaeans of Syria as well of their neighbours, the Israelites, Phoenicians, Ammonites, Moabites and Edomites. The first volume, dealing with the Aramaeans in the Bible, has contributions by Douglas Frayne, Stephen Dempster, José Loza Vera, E.J. Revell, Alexander Rofé, André Lemaire, Francolino, J. Gontalves, Baruch Halpern, Raymond C. Van Leeuwen, John William Wevers, Albert Piete
Notes on the Greek text of Exodus by John William Wevers( Book )

10 editions published between 1990 and 2013 in English and held by 269 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The way of the righteous; Psalms and the Books of Wisdom by John William Wevers( Book )

1 edition published in 1961 in English and held by 247 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Notes on the Greek text of Genesis by John William Wevers( Book )

9 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text history of the Greek Deuteronomy by John William Wevers( Book )

11 editions published in 1978 in English and German and held by 231 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Notes on the Greek text of Deuteronomy by John William Wevers( Book )

10 editions published between 1995 and 2013 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text history of the Greek Genesis by John William Wevers( Book )

9 editions published in 1974 in English and German and held by 216 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Notes on the Greek text of Leviticus by John William Wevers( Book )

8 editions published between 1997 and 2013 in English and held by 213 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Notes on the Greek text of Numbers by John William Wevers( Book )

7 editions published in 1998 in English and German and held by 209 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text history of the Greek Leviticus by John William Wevers( Book )

9 editions published between 1985 and 1986 in English and German and held by 205 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Text history of the Greek Numbers by John William Wevers( Book )

11 editions published in 1982 in English and German and held by 197 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

De Septuaginta : studies in honour of John William Wevers on his sixty-fifth birthday( Book )

9 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Exodus( Book )

9 editions published in 1991 in 3 languages and held by 178 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Genesis( Book )

12 editions published in 1974 in 5 languages and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Deuteronomium( Book )

15 editions published between 1977 and 2006 in 5 languages and held by 173 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

" ... The creation and propagation of a critical text of the LXX/OG has been a basic concern in modern scholarship. The two great text editions begun in the early 20th century are the Cambridge Septuagint and the Gt̲tingen Septuagint, each with a 'minor edition' (editio minor) and a 'major edition' (editio maior). For Cambridge this means respectively H.B. Swete, The Old Testament in Greek (1909-1922) and the so-called 'Larger Cambridge Septuagint' by A.E. Brooke, N. McLean, (and H. St. John Thackeray) (1906- ). For Gt̲tingen it denotes respectively Alfred Rahlfs's Handausgabe (1935) and the 'Larger Gt̲tingen Septuagint' (1931- ). Though Rahlfs (editio minor) can be called a semi-critical edition, the Gttingen Septuaginta (editio maior) presents a fully critical text, as described below. While both the Cambridge and Gt̲tingen editions collect and organize textual evidence, they are based on different text-critical approaches. Whereas the Swete-Cambridge edition is 'diplomatic' (see below) the Rahlfs-Gt̲tingen edition is expressly 'critical.' The difference between them did not, however, arise from any theoretical disagreement but, instead, from practical considerations. Whereas in the Cambridge view a critical edition of the LXX/OG was premature, Gt̲tingen judged that its time had come. The Cambridge Septuagint project has since lapsed (1940), but the Gt̲tingen editio maior continues. The central importance of critical editions in modern Septuagint Studies and their continued development is, therefore, not in doubt. Whereas a diplomatic edition uses as its base text a single, 'best' manuscript, to which other textual evidence is collated and organized into an apparatus, a critical text of the LXX/OG may be described as a collection of the oldest recoverable texts, carefully restored book by book (or section by section), aiming at achieving the closest approximation to the original translations (from Hebrew or Aramaic) or compositions (in Greek), systematically reconstructed from the widest array of relevant textual data (including controlled conjecture). The Gt̲tingen Septuagint features two apparatuses (as does the Larger Cambridge Septuagint), the first for LXX/OG textual evidence proper and the second for so-called hexaplaric evidence, i.e. 'rival' translations/revisions of the translated LXX/OG (such as circulated under the labels 'Theodotion, ' 'Aquila, ' and 'Symmachus'), preserved largely through the influence of Origen's Hexapla. For LXX/OG research the importance of both apparatuses is second only to the critical text itself. Though in the nature of the case, the quest for each lost Greek original is without end, it is equally true that responsible research uses such critical texts as its starting point. Similarly, though the Greek original is not claimed to be superior to subsequent text-forms that have been generated (usually by revision of various sorts) in its transmission history, it nevertheless has logical as well as historical priority. It follows from the above that electronic tools aimed at facilitating research on the Septuagintal materials -- whether the LXX/OG as produced and published (the original text) or the LXX/OG as transmitted and received (i.e. its later history) -- ought to make use of the best available critical editions as base text rather than non-critical editions, a practice which would have a regressive effect on scholarship"--The International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies
Text history of the Greek Exodus by John William Wevers( Book )

13 editions published between 1992 and 1997 in 3 languages and held by 170 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Studien zur Septuaginta, Robert Hanhart zu Ehren : aus Anlass seines 65. Geburtstages( Book )

5 editions published in 1990 in 4 languages and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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The world of the Aramaeans
Alternative Names
Wevers, J. W. 1919-2010

Wevers, John W.

Wevers, John W. 1919-2010

Wevers, John W. (John William)

Wevers, John William

Languages
Covers
Notes on the Greek text of ExodusNotes on the Greek text of DeuteronomyNotes on the Greek text of LeviticusNotes on the Greek text of NumbersDe Septuaginta : studies in honour of John William Wevers on his sixty-fifth birthday