WorldCat Identities

Ward, James 1843-1925

Overview
Works: 75 works in 280 publications in 3 languages and 4,332 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: B2798, 193
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  James Ward Publications about James Ward
Publications by  James Ward Publications by James Ward
posthumous Publications by James Ward, published posthumously.
Most widely held works about James Ward
 
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Most widely held works by James Ward
Naturalism and agnosticism; the Gifford lectures delivered before the University of Aberdeen in the years 1896-1898 by James Ward ( Book )
69 editions published between 1899 and 1980 in 3 languages and held by 913 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This book is a compilation of the Gifford lectures delivered before the University of Aberdeen between 1896-1898 by James Ward, Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic in the University of Cambridge. The lectures cover topics of the theory of psychophysical parallelism, the refutation of dualism, and spiritualistic monism"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
Psychological principles by James Ward ( Book )
30 editions published between 1918 and 2006 in English and Undetermined and held by 554 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Just forty years ago, that is in 1878--when I began lecturing on Psychology--the plan of this book was laid down. As the lectures proceeded, abstracts of some of them were privately printed for discussion at a Moral Sciences Club, in which some other Cambridge books also took their rise. The first two of these abstracts, written in 1880, were afterwards reproduced without revision in the American Journal of Speculative Philosophy for 1882-1883, one corresponding to the present chapter II, and the other, entitled 'Objects and their Interaction, ' to parts of the present chapters IV-VII. A third on Space and Time, written in 1881, was rejected by the late G. Croom Robertson the editor of Mind, as too difficult and revolutionary for publication as it stood. But afterwards he accepted and published what were to have been the two opening chapters of a book bearing the same title as this. Other chapters were to follow, but circumstances diverted them elsewhere. I have done my best in the text and still more in notes to place a studious reader au courant with the psychological literature of the present day. But there is a psychology which arrogates to itself the title of 'new.' New it undoubtedly is, and there are signs that in its present form it will not long survive. In any case it is not psychology--save in so far as it occasionally furnishes the psychologist with material of some value. As a method in the hands of psychologists it has done some good: as a pretended science in the hands of tyros whose psychological training has not even begun, it has done infinite harm. This book, however, is not so antiquated as to ignore altogether the character and claims of this 'modern' psychology, as the reader may see"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Essays in philosophy by James Ward ( Book )
12 editions published between 1927 and 1969 in English and held by 521 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Lectures on the philosophy of Kant and other philosophical lectures & essays by Henry Sidgwick ( Book )
13 editions published between 1905 and 2007 in English and Undetermined and held by 506 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A study of Kant and A lecture on Kant by James Ward ( Book )
21 editions published between 1922 and 1980 in English and Undetermined and held by 498 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Philosophy, its scope and relations; an introductory course of lectures by Henry Sidgwick ( Book )
12 editions published between 1902 and 1998 in English and held by 370 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Psychology by James Ward ( Book )
5 editions published between 1886 and 1977 in English and held by 125 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Heredity and memory ... being the Henry Sidgwick memorial lecture, delivered at Newnham college, 9 November, 1912 by James Ward ( Book )
12 editions published between 1913 and 1973 in English and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Naturalism and agnosticism the Gifford lectures delivered before the University of Aberdeen in the years 1896-1898. Vol. 2 by James Ward ( )
6 editions published in 1899 in English and Undetermined and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This book is a compilation of the Gifford lectures delivered before the University of Aberdeen between 1896-1898 by James Ward, Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic in the University of Cambridge. The lectures cover topics of the theory of psychophysical parallelism, the refutation of dualism, and spiritualistic monism"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) by James Ward ( Book )
4 editions published between 1922 and 1923 in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Psychology" ; Psychological principles by James Ward ( Book )
3 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Naturalism and agnosticism the Gifford lectures delivered before the University of Aberdeen in the years 1896-1898. Vol. 1 by James Ward ( )
2 editions published in 1899 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"These lectures do not form a systematic treatise. They only attempt to discuss in a popular way certain assumptions of 'modern science' which have led to a widespread, but more or less tacit, rejection of idealistic views of the world. These assumptions are, of course, no part of the general body of the natural sciences, but rather prepossessions that, after gradually taking shape in the minds of many absorbed in scientific studies, have entered into the current thought of our time. Though, as I believe, these prepossessions will prove to be ill-grounded and mistaken, yet they are nevertheless the almost inevitable outcome of the standpoint and the premisses from which the natural sciences start. The following is a brief outline of the argument: -- A. i. Mechanics, as a branch of mathematics dealing simply with the quantitative aspects of physical phenomena, can dispense entirely with 'real categories'; not so the mechanical theory of Nature, which aspires to resolve the actual world into an actual mechanism. Homoeopathic remedies are the best for that disorder ; and, in fact, at the present time mathematicians are, of all men of science, the least tainted with it. An inquiry into the character and mutual relations of Abstract Dynamics, Molar Mechanics, and Molecular Mechanics, seems to shew that the modern dream of a mechanical a??? is as wild as the Pythagorean of an arithmetical one. (Lectures II-VI) ii. A powerful, though unintentional refutation of this theory is furnished by Mr. Herbert Spencer's attempt to base a philosophy of evolution on the doctrine of the conservation of energy. When at length Naturalism is forced to take account of the facts of life and mind, we find the strain on the mechanical theory is more than it will bear. Mr. Spencer has blandly to confess that 'two volumes' of his 'Synthetic Philosophy' are missing, the volumes that should connect inorganic with biological, evolution. (Lectures VII-IX). Turning to the great work of Darwin, we find, on the one hand, no pretence at even conjecturing a mechanical derivation of life; and, on the other, we find teleological factors, implicating mind and incompatible with mere mechanism, regarded as indispensable. (Lecture X) iii. And finally, when confronted with the relation of mind and body, Naturalism is driven, in the endeavour to maintain its mechanical basis inviolable, to broach psychophysical theories in flagrant contradiction not only with sound mechanical principles and sound logic, but with the plain facts of daily experience. To the body as a phenomenal machine corresponds the mind as an epiphenomenal machine, albeit the correspondence cannot be called causal in any physical sense, nor casual in any logical sense. (Lectures XI-XIII) B. An examination of the ' real principles' of Naturalism thus secures us a specially advantageous position for discussing the epistemological questions on which the justification of idealism depends, iv. The dualism of matter and mind, which has made the connexion of body and soul an enigma for the naturalist, has rendered the converse problem, as to the perception of an external world, equally vexatious to the psychologist. It is obvious that there is no such dualism in experience itself, with which we must begin; and reflecting upon experience as a whole, we learn how such dualism has arisen: also we see that it is false. (Lectures XIV-XVII). Further, such reflexion shews that the unity of experience cannot be replaced by an unknowable that is no better than a gulf between two disparate series of phenomena and epiphenomena. Once materialism is abandoned and dualism found untenable, a spiritualistic monism remains the one stable position. It is only in terms of mind that we can understand the unity, activity, and regularity that nature presents. In so understanding we see that Nature is Spirit. (Lectures XVIII-XX)"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Philosophical orientation and scientific standpoints by James Ward ( )
2 editions published in 1904 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Naturalism and Agnosticism The Gifford Lectures Delivered before the University of Aberdeen in the Years 1896-1898 by James Ward ( )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Naturalism and Agnosticism The Gifford Lectures Delivered before the University of Aberdeen in the Years 1896-1898 by James Ward ( )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) by James Ward ( )
1 edition published in 1926 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Contemporary British Philosophy : Personal statements by James Ward ( Book )
2 editions published in 1925 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The moral sciences tripos by University of Cambridge ( Book )
2 editions published in 1891 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Psychological principles, by James Ward,... 2nd edition by James Ward ( Book )
1 edition published in 1920 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Contemporary British philosophy : personal statements ( Book )
1 edition published in 1965 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Languages
English (223)
Chinese (2)
Russian (2)
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