WorldCat Identities

Draper, John William 1811-1882

Overview
Works: 207 works in 1,061 publications in 9 languages and 11,559 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Textbooks 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: BL245, 215
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about John William Draper
 
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Most widely held works by John William Draper
History of the conflict between religion and science by John William Draper( Book )

235 editions published between 1095 and 2012 in 8 languages and held by 1,649 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This book is about the history of the conflict between religion and science, covering in-depth investigation of the origin of science, religion and its relations to science, various conflicts respecting the doctrine of the unity of God, the nature of the soul, the nature of the world, the age of the earth, the criterion of truth, the government of the universe; and the crisis among religion, faith, civilization and science."--Amazon.com
History of the intellectual development of Europe by John William Draper( Book )

195 editions published between 1861 and 2011 in 6 languages and held by 1,265 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The author asserts that a philosophical principle becomes valuable if it can be used as a guide in the practical purposes of life. The object of this book is to impress upon its reader a conviction that civilization does not proceed in an arbitrary manner or by chance, but that it passes through a determinate succession of stages, and is a development according to law. For this purpose, the book considers the relations between individual and social life, and showed that they are physiologically inseparable, and that the course of communities bears an unmistakable resemblance to the progress of an individual, and that man is the archetype or exemplar of society. Next, the author examines the intellectual history of Greece--a nation offering the best and most complete illustration of the life of humanity. From the beginnings of its mythology in old Indian legends and of, its philosophy in Ionia, we saw that it passed through phases like those of the individual to its decrepitude and death in Alexandria. Then, addressing ourselves to the history of Europe, we found that, if suitably divided into groups of ages, these groups, compared with each other in chronological succession, present a striking resemblance to the successive phases of Greek life, and therefore to that which Greek life resembles--that is to say, individual life. Nations, like individuals, are born, pass through a predestined growth, and die. One comes to its end at an early period and in an untimely way; another, not until it has gained maturity. But for every one there is an orderly way of progress to its final term, whatever that term may be." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Life of Franklin by John William Draper( Book )

9 editions published in 1977 in English and Undetermined and held by 657 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

History of the American Civil War by John William Draper( Book )

34 editions published between 1867 and 2000 in 3 languages and held by 656 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Thoughts on the future civil policy of America by John William Draper( Book )

40 editions published between 1865 and 2007 in English and German and held by 533 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A treatise on the forces which produce the organization of plants : with an appendix containing several memoirs on capillary attraction, electricity, and the chemical action of light by John William Draper( Book )

16 editions published between 1844 and 1972 in English and held by 499 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Scientific memoirs, being experimental contributions to a knowledge of radiant energy by John William Draper( Book )

18 editions published between 1878 and 1973 in English and Undetermined and held by 389 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A text-book on chemistry. For the use of schools and colleges by John William Draper( Book )

30 editions published between 1846 and 1861 in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Elements of chemistry, including the most recent discoveries and applications of the science to medicine and pharmacy, and to the arts by Robert Kane( Book )

31 editions published between 1842 and 2000 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human physiology, statical and dynamical, or, The conditions and course of the life of man by John William Draper( Book )

23 editions published between 1856 and 1883 in English and Russian and held by 150 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A text-book on natural philosophy by John William Draper( Book )

20 editions published between 1847 and 1972 in English and held by 147 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Introductory lecture to the course of chemistry by John William Draper( Book )

17 editions published between 1841 and 1974 in English and held by 126 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The indebtedness of the city of New York to its university. An address to the alumni of the University of the city of New York, at their twenty-first anniversary, 28th June, 1853 by John William Draper( Book )

7 editions published between 1853 and 1974 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Human physiology, statistical and dynamical; or, The conditions and course of the life of man by John William Draper( Book )

11 editions published between 1856 and 2011 in English and held by 100 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Two years ago the first edition of this work was published. Since that time several thousand copies have been disposed of; it has been introduced as a text-book in many of our medical schools, and has been very favorably received by the profession and the public. I have therefore felt it necessary to submit it to a careful examination, for the purpose of removing any errors it may contain, and improving it as far as its present form admits. In these corrections I have availed myself of many of the suggestions made in various reviews of the original work, and take this occasion to express my thanks for the consideration shown toward it both in America and Europe. To treat Physiology as a branch of Physical Science; to exclude from it all purely speculative doctrines and ideas, the relics of a philosophy (if such it can be called) which flourished in the Middle Ages, though now fast dying out, and from which the more advanced subjects of human knowledge, such as Astronomy and Chemistry, have long ago made themselves free-to do this, amounts, in reality, to a reorganization and reconstruction: a task of extreme difficulty, and for complete success demanding the conjoint labors of many philosophers and many physicians. To physicians I would earnestly address myself, in the hope of obtaining their continued aid and hearty patronage for every such attempt. I would ask them why it is that we never hear of empiricism in Natural Philosophy, Engineering, Astronomy? Is it not because the principles upon which those subjects rest have ceased to be speculative, and are restricted to the demonstrative, the experimental, the practical? In Philosophy, sects only arise while principles are uncertain; in Medicine, the quack only exists because there is a doubt. The practice of Medicine must rest on an exact Anatomy and a sound Physiology. As soon as it is brought to this, empiricism will disappear of itself; it will need no legal enactments, no ethical codes for its destruction. And for this reason, if there were no others, it is the bounden duty of every physician to encourage to the utmost within his own sphere of influence every attempt to realize such a state of things. The encouragement which has been given to this book I regard as a token that these principles are profoundly recognized by the medical profession of our country. In this work I have therefore endeavored to treat of man according to the methods accepted in Physical Science, but still of man as an individual only. Physiology, however, in its most general acceptation, has another department connected with problems of the highest interest. Man must be studied not merely in the individual, but also in the race. There is an analogy between his advance from infancy through childhood, youth, manhood, to old age, and his progress through the stages of civilization. In the whole range of human study there are no topics of greater importance, or more profound, than those dealt with in this second department or division. It is also capable of being treated in the same spirit and upon the same principles as the first"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Les Conflits de la science et de la religion by John William Draper( Book )

41 editions published between 1875 and 1980 in 3 languages and held by 90 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

University of New-York, Medical department. A valedictory lecture by John William Draper( Book )

7 editions published between 1841 and 1956 in English and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An introductory lecture on oxygen gas delivered in the University of New York, session MDCCCXLVIII-IX by John William Draper( Book )

5 editions published between 1848 and 1974 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Address delivered to the American Union Academy of Literature, Science, and Art, at its first annual meeting, January 31, 1870 by John William Draper( Book )

4 editions published between 1870 and 1974 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An introductory lecture on phosphorus delivered in the University of New York, session MDCCCXLVII-VIII by John William Draper( Book )

5 editions published between 1847 and 1974 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Elements of chemistry, including the most recent discoveries and applications of the science to medicine and pharmacy, and to the arts. Illustrated by 236 wood-cuts by Robert Kane( Book )

3 editions published in 1842 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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History of the conflict between religion and science
Alternative Names
Con Uilyam Dreper

Djon Vlʹyam Drpr

Dorepa

Doreparu, Jiyon Uhiruriamu

Draper Guglielmo 1811-1882

Draper, J. W.

Draper, J. W. 1811-1882

Draper, J. W. (John William), 1811-1882.

Draper, Jan Wilhelm.

Draper, John W. 1811-1882

Draper, John William

Draper, John Wm.

Draper, Juan Guillermo.

Draper Juan Guillermo 1811-1882

Drapera Jana Wilhelma 1811-1882

Drper, Dzhon Uil'iam.

Drėper, Dzhon Uilʹi︠a︡m 1811-1882

Dreper Dzhon Viliiam 1811-1882

John William Draper

John William Draper amerikansk kemiker, fotograf, fysiker og historiker

John William Draper amerikansk kemist, fotograf, fysiker och historiker

John William Draper amerikansk kjemikar, fotograf, fysikar og historikar

John William Draper amerikansk kjemiker, fotograf, fysiker og historiker

John William Draper angelschsischer Naturwissenschaftler und Historiker

John William Draper scienziato, filosofo e fisico statunitense

Джон Вильям Дрэпэр

Джон Вільям Дрейпер

Джон Уильям Дрейпер

Дрепер, Џон Уилјем.

ג'ון ויליאם דרייפר

دجون ۆىيليام درەپەر

دراپر، جون وليام، ١٨١١-١٨٨٢

دراپه<<>>ر، ژون وليام، ١٨١١-١٨٨٢

دراپه&#x3c;&#x3c;&#x3e;&#x3e;ر، ژون وليام، ١٨١١-١٨٨٢

ドレーパー

ドレーパー, ジョン・ウィリアム

ドレパル, ジヨン・ウヒルリアム

達勒巴児

達勒巴児, 戎維廉

Languages
Covers
History of the intellectual development of EuropeHistory of the American Civil WarThoughts on the future civil policy of AmericaElements of chemistry, including the most recent discoveries and applications of the science to medicine and pharmacy, and to the arts