WorldCat Identities

American Mutoscope and Biograph Company

Overview
Works: 339 works in 519 publications in 3 languages and 8,354 library holdings
Genres: Short films  Nonfiction films  Documentary films  History  Silent films  Social problem films  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Western films  Actualities (Motion pictures)  Comedy films 
Roles: prn, Producer, Photographer, Assignee
Classifications: PN1995.9.S62, 791.436552
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about American Mutoscope and Biograph Company
 
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Most widely held works by American Mutoscope and Biograph Company
Treasures III : Social Issues in American Film, 1900-1934( Visual )

1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 382 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In the years before World War I, virtually no issue was too controversial to bring to the screen. The first American movies were deeply engaged with society, coming from an era when movies and entertainment were intimately interwoven with public debate. As such, they were shown in commercial movie theaters but also in clubs, churches, schools, and everywhere screens could be hung outdoors--from the sides of city tenements to country barns. This archive sends these treasures back into the world, where they found their inspiration. "The City Reformed" deals with the urban problems: poverty, criminality, health, safety, child welfare, and corruption. Gender, family, and the crusade for equal voting rights dominate in program 2, "New Women." Labor struggles and oppression are central to program 3, "Toil and Tyranny." The final program, "Americans in the Making," brings together films confronting immigration, race relations, and wartime home-front sacrifice
The great train robbery and other primary works by Edwin S Porter( Visual )

2 editions published between 1994 and 2002 in English and held by 364 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"The genesis of the motion picture medium is recreated in this collection of films from cinema's formative period. More than crucial historical artifacts, these films reveal the foundation from which the styles and stories of the contemporary cinema would later arise. An animated rendering of Eadweard Muybridge's primitive motion studies (1877-85) begins the program, immediately defining the compound appeal of cinema as both a scientific marvel and sensational popular entertainment. This is followed by the works of Louis and Auguste Lumière."--Publisher
Scenes in San Francisco, [no. 1]( Visual )

4 editions published in 1906 in English and held by 175 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The following is a scene-by-scene description of the film: [Frame: 0100] The camera, positioned at the southwest corner of Mission and 5th streets, makes a hurried and jerky pan from the east side of 5th Street eastward to the south side of Mission Street. At the start of the pan, the ruined Lincoln School building is seen, with the dark profile of the Flood Building behind it on Market Street. The camera pans right on a long row of windows in the ruined west wall of the Emporium department store [0130]. The tent in the foreground is probably a temporary "office" of the business formerly on the site. The pan continues further right and looks northeast down Mission Street. [0338] The Rialto Building stands in the distance. The camera pans farther right, to another tent and a sign -- "Safes opened 105 5th Street" [0420]. Many safes fused shut in the heat of the fire and others had to be cooled for weeks before being opened. [0441] The camera is at the southwest corner of 4th and Market streets, looking northeast across Market Street in afternoon light. The Mutual Savings Bank (two blank walls) is in the background at Geary/Kearny and Market streets. The street traffic is part of the afternoon commute down Market Street to the Ferry Building. [0485] Note the heavily-laden wagon (perhaps containing a family's possessions) and the Sanitary Laundry Company wagon. [1638] The camera captures a traffic jam on Market Street. The view is probably north, across Market Street just east of California Street, in the afternoon. The laying of streetcar tracks along this section of Market Street may be the cause of the bottleneck. [1835] The view is northwest, near the southwest corner of East and Market streets, just west of the Ferry Building. A heavily-laden streetcar approaches the Ferry Building. [1908] Note the beggar on crutches. [2075] In the hazy background are Nob Hill and the south slope of Russian Hill (right). [2135] The view is approximately the same as the previous segment, with a streetcar beginning its run up Market Street. [2814] Note the sailor patrolling with fixed bayonet. In the hazy distance unburnt dwellings on the summit of Russian Hill are visible. Nob Hill is in the distance, with the rectangular silhouette of the Fairmont Hotel. [3000] In this very brief scene the camera focuses on workers removing debris. The view is east on Mission Street between 4th and 3rd streets, just east of St. Patrick's Church, part of which is visible at left. [3075] The camera pans to show the demolition of the facade of St. Patrick's Church. The camera is southwest of the church on Mission Street between 4th and 3rd streets. After a brief view of ruins along Market Street, the camera pans right (eastward) past two men near a fire engine [3270], to the church facade being demolished [3957]. Of particular interest is the cameraman seen in the foreground filming the action. He is photographing the film titled San Francisco Earthquake and Fire, April 18, 1906
Skating on lake, Central Park( Visual )

5 editions published in 1902 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The view is of a frozen lake in Central Park crowded with ice skaters. The film is of such poor quality that it is difficult to tell if the apparent "snow" is real or just scratches on the film
Opening the Williamsburg Bridge( Visual )

5 editions published in 1904 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film was shot on the roadway of the newly constructed Williamsburg Bridge. The first people to come into view are press photographers carrying large wooden "box" cameras. Next, a parade of dignitaries and military representatives, accompanied by members of the press, is photographed passing the camera position led by a standard bearer whose banner reads "MAYOR". The mayor of New York was Seth Low, a lame-duck at the time of filming, having been defeated in November, 1903 by George B. McClellan. The Williamsburg Bridge, a combined cantilever and suspension bridge, crosses the East River from Delancey and Clinton Streets, Manhattan, to Roebling and S. 5th Streets, Williamsburg. Built at a cost of twelve million dollars, it held two lanes of roadway, two "L" tracks, four trolley tracks, and two promenades. It was the largest suspension bridge in the world at the time
Parade of "exempt" firemen( Visual )

5 editions published in 1903 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film shows a large group of people watching the approach of a color guard followed by a number of elderly marching firemen [Frame: 1734] pulling antique fire equipment [2486]. In the background is the white marble Washington Arch [0116], designed by Stanford White and completed in 1895 to commemorate the first inauguration of George Washington
A perilous proceeding( Visual )

5 editions published in 1902 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film follows a group of approximately ten men who are suspended on the cable of a large crane atop a building under construction. As the men are lifted over the site and gradually lowered, they wave to the camera
At the foot of the Flatiron( Visual )

5 editions published in 1903 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This street level view is of the Broadway side of the Flatiron, or Fuller Building, near the narrow north corner. Filmed on a very windy day, pedestrians of various descriptions are seen passing by the camera, clutching hats and skirts against the wind. According to some New York City historians, this corner was known as the windiest corner of the city, and in the era of the long skirt, standing on it was considered a good vantage point for a glimpse of a lady's ankle. Policemen would chase away such loungers from the 23rd Street corner, giving rise to the expression "twenty-three skidoo."
N.Y. Fire Department returning( Visual )

6 editions published in 1903 in English and held by 169 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Shot at an unidentified location in New York City, the film shows several pieces of horse-drawn fire vehicles in motion: two hook-and-ladders; two steam pumpers; a rescue wagon. Note the kids hanging on the back of some of the vehicles
Beginning of a skyscraper( Visual )

4 editions published in 1902 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From a contemporary American Mutoscope and Biograph Company catalog: Starting a Skyscraper--New York--26 feet. Taken in the immense excavation for the foundation of the new Macy Building at the corner of Broadway and 34th Street, New York. An excellent study of modern American push and enterprise
Pennsylvania Tunnel excavation( Visual )

4 editions published in 1905 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This film employs a 180-degree pan shot of the excavation site of New York's Pennsylvania Station, and includes shots of the narrow-gauge train used to haul debris from the tunnels under construction. Work began in 1904, and when completed in September of 1910 the station would span from 31st to 33rd Streets, and from 7th to 8th Avenue, an area of approximately 300,000 square feet. It would connect a massive rail tunnel system, bringing the Pennsylvania and Lehigh Railroads under the Hudson River and the Long Island Railroad under the East River to a terminal in the center of Manhattan, accommodating a network of twenty-seven tracks
Buffalo Bill's Wild West parade( Visual )

5 editions published in 1902 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film shows a parade down Fifth Avenue, New York. In the foreground many children, both black and white, can be seen following alongside the parade. The participants in the parade include cowboys, Indians, and soldiers in the uniform of the United States Cavalry on horseback and riding horse-drawn coaches. Buffalo Bill can be seen on horseback, lifting his hat to the crowd
The skyscrapers of New York( Visual )

4 editions published in 1906 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This melodrama was filmed during the actual construction of a skyscraper in New York City, and includes several scenes of real work crews: a line of bricklayers, a man heating rivets in a forge, riveters assembling steel girders, men astride the steel framework maneuvering and setting a girder in place, and a group of men descending on a crane line. The story involves a construction foreman who fires one of his crew for fighting, which leads the disgruntled employee to steal. He causes the blame to be put on the foreman, who is finally exonerated when the thief is exposed. All of this conflict is woven in and around the actual construction of the building as the work is in progress. There is even one scene of a hand-to-hand fight between the foreman and the villain that takes place on the unprotected ledge of the steel framework of the building. Some New York City landmarks seen in the film include Union Square (between Broadway and 4th Avenue, 14th-17th Street), and the Everett House, opposite the northeast corner of the square at 17th St. and 4th Avenue. The film includes the original AM&B title frames at head of film
Elevated railroad, New York( Visual )

5 editions published in 1903 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film was photographed from the front platform of a train traveling over elevated tracks in New York City. Although many of the buildings alongside the tracks can be seen, it is difficult to determine the exact location of the scene
Star Theatre( Visual )

4 editions published in 1902 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Using time-lapse photography, the film shows the demolition of the famous Star Theatre. Judging from the various exposures, the work must have gone on for a period of approximately thirty days. The theater opened in 1861 as "Wallack's Theatre," and was re-christened the "Star" in 1883. It was well known for it's excellent productions, and a number of celebrated actors and actresses worked there, among them Ellen Terry. The celebrated English actor Henry Irving made his first stage appearance in America at the Star
Lower Broadway( Visual )

4 editions published in 1903 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The film shows a view which appears to be looking north on Broadway at the intersection of Wall Street, in front of Trinity Church. The sidewalk along Broadway is crowded with people, and the traffic in both streets is very heavy. A horse-drawn streetcar passes in front of the camera [Frame: 2814], with a sign giving its destination as the "Courtland and Fulton Street Ferry."
Departure of Peary [and the] "Roosevelt" from New York( Visual )

4 editions published in 1905 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The camera pans to show the schooner "Roosevelt" docked at a covered pier on the Hudson River on Manhattan's west side. Then, from a camera position on board, men in straw hats and fashionably dressed ladies are seen boarding the ship. Next, the famous polar explorer Robert Peary appears on the gangway in a dark jacket, mustache and straw hat [Frame: 4552]. He tips his hat, consults his watch, then, just before the film ends, motions to order the departure. On this expedition he achieved the "farthest north" record, but failed to reach the North Pole. Completed only four months prior to this film, the "Roosevelt" was specially designed to withstand Arctic ice. She was 184 feet long, 35 and a half feet wide, with a hull over two and a half feet thick. Fully loaded the ship weighed 1,500 tons while drawing only 16.2 feet. In addition to sail power, the ship was driven by a 1000 horsepower steam engine, which could produce short bursts of even greater power to get the ship through thick ice. The "Roosevelt" served Peary on this expedition as well as the following one in 1908-1909. Sold numerous times to a variety of commercial concerns, the "Roosevelt" was abandoned to the elements on a mud flat in Cristobal, Panama in 1937, where she eventually rotted away
Arrival of emigrants [i.e. immigrants], Ellis Island( Visual )

4 editions published in 1906 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Depicts scenes at the Immigration Depot and a nearby dock on Ellis Island. Appears to show, first, a group of immigrants lined up to board a vessel leaving the island, then another group arriving at the island and being directed off of the dock and into the Depot by a uniformed official
Excavating for a New York foundation( Visual )

4 editions published in 1903 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The scene is an excavation pit at an unidentified New York City construction site. A crew of six men can be seen shoveling dirt into a four-wheeled wooden cart. Then a full cart is slowly lifted out of the pit to street level by a steam-powered crane. These carts are similar in design to those shown dumping rubble at the end of the film New York City Dumping Wharf. Advertisements and campaign posters can be seen on the exposed wall of the building in the background
Panorama from Times Building, New York( Visual )

4 editions published in 1905 in English and held by 168 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The view is from the top of the then newly-erected Times Building, at a height of approximately twenty stories. The film opens with a vertical pan, going from the street below up to the sky. The photographer then makes a pan to the north over the tops of the buildings from Bryant Park, south of 42nd Street (behind the New York Public Library) [Frame: 1078] up 6th Avenue to the Hippodrome Theatre at 43rd Street [1866]. A marquee on the theater reads "A Yankee Circus On Mars." The camera continues to rotate toward 44th and 45th Streets between 6th and 7th Avenues, until coming to rest looking directly north up Times Square to 46th Street, where Broadway (left) and 7th Avenue (right) diverge again [3676]
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityAmerican Mutoscope Company

controlled identityBiograph Company

AM&B

AM&B

American Mutoscope & Biograph Company

American Mutoscope & Biograph Company

American Mutoscope & Biograph Company Studio City, Calif

American Mutoscope and Biograph Company casa di produzione cinematografica statunitense

American Mutoscope and Biograph Company compagnie cinématographique américaine

Biograph Company amerykańska wytwórnia filmowa

Mutoscope & Biograph Company

Mutoscope & Biograph Company Studio City, Calif

Mutoscope and Biograph Company

Mutoscope and Biograph Company Studio City, Calif

バイオグラフ社

比奥格拉夫电影公司

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