WorldCat Identities

United States Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation, and Research

Overview
Works: 192 works in 297 publications in 1 language and 3,084 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Case studies  Periodicals 
Classifications: HD1525, 331.7630973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about United States
 
Most widely held works by United States
Farm labor in the United States by Charles E Bishop( Book )

2 editions published between 1967 and 1968 in English and held by 645 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Dimensions of the farm labor problem. The current situation of the hired farm labor force. Famr labor adjustments to changing technology. National employment, skills, and earings of farm labor. Occupational mobility form the farm labor force. Farm manpower policy. Manpower development programs for farm people
The selection of trainees under MDTA by Jack Chernick( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 96 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The purposes of the study were (1) to examine the selection process for training, and (2) to delineate the characteristics of persons who were selected or rejected or, though registered, never applied for training. A systematic 10 percent sample, 1,958 persons, of the employment service (es) population was drawn from the es-511 active card file in three offices in the newark area during the final months of 1964. of the original sample, 498 persons, classified by manpower development and training act (mdta) status, were interviewed in the summer of 1965. the 10 percent sample and the interview sample were compared as to demographic, psychological, and occupational characteristics, employment status, courses, and training and post-training experience. Training opportunities under mdta were available to only a small fraction of the unemployed. When compared to the population as a whole, persons accepted for training were more frequently in the prime working-age groups, had more years of schooling, and were more likely to be negroes. Of those enrolled in training, 56 percent of the negroes and 47 percent of the whites completed the courses. However, 70 percent of those rejected by mdta were negroes. Counseling and testing were important mechanisms in the mdta selection process. Generally, those completing the training, and many of the dropouts, were satisfied with it. The appendix contains the methodological analysis. A related document is vt 002 700. (em)
The church and the antipoverty program by Benjamin L Masse( Book )

5 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Expanding employment in a pluralistic economy by Eli Ginzberg( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Research in apprenticeship training; proceedings of a conference, September 8-9, 1966 by Research Conference on Apprenticeship Training( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Structural unemployment in the United States by Charles Killingsworth( Book )

2 editions published in 1965 in English and held by 85 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

International differences in factors affecting labour mobility by International Labour Office( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On the line; [an address by Harvey Swados( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 78 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The employment of retired military personnel by Laure M Sharp( Book )

3 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 75 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Civilian employment for men retiring from the American military service is a manpower topic that is receiving continually greater attention. Current policies tacitly assume the possibility of smooth transfers from the military to the civilian sector for a steadily growing number of physically able military retirees (an estimated 1 million by 1980). This report deals with the most comprehensive study yet undertaken of the employment transition from military to civilian life by a portion of this large reservoir of trained manpower. The primary interest here is in the intrinsic significance of the problems of this segment of the national labor force. The problems faced by men seeking civilian employment following military careers of 20 years or more, and the methods they employ in the process, may also have much relevance for the growing number of civilians who similarly need to make a change in career during the middle years. One specific objective of the study was to determine the extent to which specific occupational skills have 'high' or 'low' transferability from military to civilian occupations, and the implications of these findings for needed training and retraining programs
Oak Glen, a training camp for unemployed youth by Jane Roberts Chapman( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 74 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A training camp for unemployed youth near riverside, california is described in this summary of a detailed report, "an evaluation of the concept of trainee camps for unemployed youth," prepared by the stanford research institute (sri). Youth between 16 and 21 years of age, not in school, and with little chance of employment because of lack of skills, knowledge, or abilities participated in the program. The objectives of the sri study were to determine (1) the proportion of trainees who found employment or enrolled in further training, (2) the extent to which trainees who entered the program but terminated before completing may have benefited from their experience, (3) factors in the camp experiences which benefited the trainees, and (4) the characteristics of the trainees. Data, chiefly from camp files, were obtained on 77 current trainees, 113 graduates, 207 trainees who terminated prior to the completion of the program, and 82 who were accepted but did not attend. The rate of termination of trainees before graduation was 60 percent. Almost 70 percent of the graduates were employed, compared with approximately 55 percent of the terminees. Factors which seemed to benefit trainees were (1) receiving praise, rewards, and individual attention, (2) improving physical condition through training and diet, (3) increasing reading and math proficiency, and (4) in some cases, learning to work under discipline and regimentation. An annotated bibliography is provided. Copies of this document are available from manpower administration, office of manpower, policy, evaluation, and research, U.S. department of labor, 14th street and constitution avenue, N.W., washington, D.C. 20210. (ps)
Job redesign for older workers; ten case studies by United States( Book )

2 editions published in 1967 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Manpower research by United States( )

in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Evaluation of changes in skill-profile and job-content due to technological change; methodology and pilot results from the banking, steel and aerospace industries by Berkeley University of California( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The major objective was to test the hypothesis that the highest levels of mechanization and automation generally require lower levels of skills than earlier production systems. A secondary objective was to develop an instrument capable of giving unbiased projections of the manpower impact of specific advances in production technology. Dependent variables were man-hour requirements per unit product and required skill level rated on a priviously developed scale. Data from actual observations of processes, from company job analysis instruments, and employee, cost, and production records were collected independently from two firms in each industry for which an old and a new process were compared -- banking, steel annealing, steel galvanizing, and aerospace metal machining. All pairs of processes showed the expected reduction in man-hour requirement per unit, and in all cases installation of the new process was justified in terms of higher productivity. Mean skill levels were increased to a statistically significant extent in all cases except metal machining where they were reduced significantly. However, the changes were small in absolute terms. Manpower demand increases resulting from using the new processes were not big enough to affect the labor force. Therefore, other sectors of the economy will have to furnish needed employment. The appendix, approximately 200 pages, contains procedures for creating the instruments used in the study, raw data, data analysis, and job descriptions within the five cases. (Em)
Projective models of employment by industry and by occupation for small areas : a case study by Louis Theodore Harms( Book )

2 editions published between 1966 and 1972 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Internal labor markets, technological change, and labor force adjustment by Peter B Doeringer( Book )

3 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Differences between labor force skills and the requirements of blue collar jobs are reconciled by means over which the employer, alone or with a labor organization, exercises control. The adjustment model presented in this study recognizes an inplant labor market connected to the external market at a limited number of points. Certain variables--inplant job structure, administrative rules, external labor force size and character, hiring standards, compensation, and procedures for recruiting, screening, and training--form both the major determinant of inplant labor costs and the means of adapting to changing technology and labor supply. Private adjustment mechanisms, mostly training on the job, correct imbalances between needed job skills and labor force characteristics, but they operate at a cost. Federal manpower programs should stress general training in basic mathematical and verbal skills, subsidized inplant training and selection programs, and information exchange among plants. (Document includes 110 references.) This document, pb-174-614, is available from the clearinghouse for federal scientific and technical information, springfield, va. 22151. microfiche $0.65, hardcopy $8.00. (author/ly)
Obsolescence and updating of engineers' and scientists' skills; final revised report by Columbia University Seminar on Technology and Social Change( Book )

4 editions published between 1966 and 1968 in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The nature and approximate dimensions of the technical skill obsolescence problem were studied as a result of the widely alleged occurrence in recent years of deterioration of skills among practicing engineers and applied scientists resulting from the massive emergence of new scientific and technological knowledge during the past quarter century. Interviews were conducted with technical managers, directors of professional employee development, and other knowledgeable officials in 39 technology-oriented firms and in technical colleges and universities, professional technical societies, and governmental units concerned with the obsolescence problem. Data indicated four component subareas of the problem for which effective remedial measures are difficult to find -- (1) motivating professional research-development-design personnel whose skills have become outdated, (2) determining disposition of the skill of obsolescent personnel when reductions in professional technical work force are necessary, (3) identifying, developing, and updating competent project leaders, systems engineers, and other key practicing professionals, and (4) assessing the kind and degree of updating needed by technical managers and providing means and incentives necessary to bring about such updating. Data suggested similar significant difficulties in technology-oriented industry at large, and consequently, a need for broader scope research into these problems. (Hc)
Report of the Secretary of Labor on manpower research and training under the Manpower development and training act by United States( )

in English and held by 51 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Costs and returns of technical education; a pilot study by Adger B Carroll( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 50 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objectives of this study were (1) to obtain estimates of costs and returns of technical education, (2) to compute social and private rates of return on investments in technical education, and (3) to compare these with estimates of the rate of return on general education and investments in tangible capital. Costs and returns were measured by comparing earnings of a group of 45 white male gaston technical school graduates with earnings for a group of 45 white male high school graduates having similar characteristics. The comparison covered a 7-year period. The estimated average total cost to society for the two years of technical education was $7,425 per student which included $5,197 for loss in productivity while in school and $2,228 for costs of providing school facilities, supplies, and personnel. The average total private cost per student for the two years of technical schooling amounted to $4,920. the average annual income from investment in technical education increased from $553 in the first year after schooling to $1,036 in the fourth post-graduate year. The estimated social rate of return on investments in technical education was 16.5 percent and the private rate, 22 percent, assuming that per capita real earnings would increase over time at the rate of 2 percent per annum. (Pa)
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityUnited States. Department of Labor. Manpower Administration

controlled identityUnited States. Office of Manpower, Automation and Training

controlled identityUnited States. Office of Manpower Research

O.M.P.E.R.

Omper

United States. Department of Labor. Manpower Administration. Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation, and Research

United States. Department of Labor. Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation, and Research

United States. Dept. of Labor. Manpower Administration. Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation, and Research

United States. Dept. of Labor. Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation, and Research

Languages
English (56)