WorldCat Identities

Robins, Philip K.

Overview
Works: 85 works in 211 publications in 1 language and 2,748 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Conference proceedings 
Roles: Editor
Classifications: HV741, 362.71
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Philip K Robins Publications about Philip K Robins
Publications by  Philip K Robins Publications by Philip K Robins
Most widely held works by Philip K Robins
Child support and child well-being ( Book )
2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 469 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A Guaranteed annual income : evidence from a social experiment ( Book )
9 editions published between 1979 and 1980 in English and held by 381 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Child care and public policy : studies of the economic issues ( Book )
7 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 331 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Reemployment bonuses in the unemployment insurance system evidence from three field experiments ( )
5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 250 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Child support assurance : design issues, expected impacts, and political barriers as seen from Wisconsin ( Book )
4 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 202 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Financial incentives for increasing work and income among low-income families by Rebecca M Blank ( Book )
13 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 101 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper investigates the impact of financial incentive programs, which have become an increasingly common component of welfare programs. We review experimental evidence from several such programs. Financial incentive programs appear to increase work and raise income (lower poverty), but cost somewhat more than alternative welfare programs. In particular, windfall beneficiaries -- those who would have been working anyway -- can raise costs by participating in the program. Several existing programs limit this effect by targeting long-term welfare recipients or by limiting benefits to full-time workers. At the same time, because financial incentive programs transfer support to working low-income families, the increase in costs due to windfall beneficiaries makes these programs more effective at alleviating poverty and raising incomes. Evidence also indicates that combining financial incentive programs with job search and job support services can increase both employment and income gains. Non-experimental evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and from state Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) programs with enhanced earnings disregards also suggests that these programs increase employment, and this evidence is consistent with the experimental evidence on the impact of financial incentive programs
Do financial incentives encourage welfare recipients to work? : evidence from a randomized evaluation of the self-sufficiency project by David E Card ( Book )
12 editions published between 1996 and 1998 in English and Undetermined and held by 88 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This paper reports on a randomized evaluation of an earnings subsidy offered to long-term welfare recipients in Canada. The program -- known as the Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) -- provides a supplement equal to one-half of the difference between a target earnings level and a participant's actual earnings. The SSP supplement is similar to a negative income tax with two important differences: (1) eligibility is limited to long-term welfare recipients who find a full-time job; and (2) the payment depends on individual earnings rather than family income. Our evaluation is based on a classical randomized design: one half of a group of single parents who had been on welfare for over a year were eligible to receive the SSP supplement, while the other half were assigned to a control group. Results for an early cohort of SSP participants and controls suggest that the financial incentives of the Self-Sufficiency Program increase labor market attachment and reduce welfare participation
Would financial incentives for leaving welfare lead some people to stay on welfare longer? : an experimental evaluation of 'entry effects' in the Self-Sufficiency Project by David E Card ( Book )
10 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 87 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The limits to wage growth : measuring the growth rate of wages for recent welfare leavers by David E Card ( Book )
10 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
We study the rate of wage growth among welfare leavers in the Self Sufficiency Program (SSP), an experimental earnings subsidy offered to long-term welfare recipients in Canada. Single parents who started working in response to the SSP incentive are younger, less educated, and have more young children than those who would have been working regardless of the program. They also earn relatively low wages in their first few months of work: typically within $1 of the minimum wage. Despite these differences, their rate of wage growth is similar to other welfare leavers. We estimate that people who were induced to work by SSP experienced real wage growth of about 2.5 - 3 percent per year - a rate consistent with conventional measures of the return to experience for similar workers
Do financial incentives encourage welfare recipients to work? : initial 18-month findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project by David E Card ( Book )
4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 66 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
When financial work incentives pay for themselves: early findings from the Self-Sufficiency Project's applicant study by Charles Michalopoulos ( Book )
3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Self-Sufficiency Project (SSP) provides a generous, time-limited earnings supplement to long-term recipients of income assistance who leave welfare and find full-time employment. This report summarizes the mid-term findings of one of three SSP experiments, an applicant study. In this study, single parents from British Columbia who had recently started a new spell of income assistance were randomly assigned to either a program group, which was offered the opportunity to receive SSP supplement payments, or to a control group, which was not. The report uses administrative data & survey information to assess the effects of the SSP during the first 2.5 years of the study, or 18 months after most members of the program group could have begun receiving the supplement. Impacts of SSP on employment, income, and net public expenditures are discussed. In addition, the report compares results from the applicant study with results from a study of SSP recipients in British Columbia and New Brunswick. These comparisons examine the effects of an ongoing program compared with those of a new program and the impacts per eligible program group member, and validate results for the applicant study
Measuring wage growth among former welfare recipients by David E Card ( Book )
5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 56 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The value of non-market time lost during the self-sufficiency project by David H Greenberg ( )
3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 40 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An analysis of trends in child support and AFDC from 1978 to 1983 by Philip K Robins ( Book )
2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 26 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
How important are "entry effects" in financial incentive programs for welfare recipients? : experimental evidence from the self-sufficiency project by David E Card ( Book )
3 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Child support enforcement as a means of reducing welfare dependency and poverty by Philip K Robins ( Book )
3 editions published between 1984 and 1986 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Child support and welfare : an analysis of the issues : final report by Philip K Robins ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Why are child support award amounts declining? by Philip K Robins ( Book )
2 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Private child support : current and potential impacts by Donald Oellerich ( Book )
3 editions published between 1989 and 1991 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Welfare benefits and family-size decisions of never-married women by Philip K Robins ( Book )
1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Audience level: 0.79 (from 0.70 for Child supp ... to 0.94 for An analysi ...)
Alternative Names
Robins, P.
Robins, P. K.
Robins, Philip
Languages
English (101)
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