WorldCat Identities

Deardorff, Alan V.

Overview
Works: 302 works in 694 publications in 3 languages and 12,195 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings  Dictionaries  Festschriften 
Roles: Author, Editor, Honoree, Other
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Alan V Deardorff
Terms of trade : glossary of international economics by Alan V Deardorff( )

36 editions published between 2006 and 2014 in English and held by 2,562 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Have you ever wondered what a term in international economics means? This useful reference book offers a glossary of terms in both international trade and international finance, with emphasis on economic issues. It is intended for students getting their first exposure to international economics, although advanced students will also find it useful for some of the more obscure terms that they have forgotten or never encountered." "Besides an extensive glossary of terms, there is a picture gallery of diagrams used to explain key concepts such as the Edgeworth Production Box and the Offer Curve Diagram in international economics. This section is followed by several lists of terms that occur a lot in international economics, grouped by subject to help users find terms that they cannot recall."--Jacket
Measurement of nontariff barriers by Alan V Deardorff( )

32 editions published between 1984 and 2010 in English and held by 1,907 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There is increasing interest in the extent to which existing nontariff barriers (NTBs) may distort and restrict international trade. Measurement of Nontariff Barriers assesses currently available methods for quantifying the size and impact of existing NTBs and makes recommendations on those methods of measurement that countries and individual researchers can use most effectively. The focus of this book is on both conceptual issues arising in the measurement of different NTBs and on the applied research that has been done, especially in the major industrial economies
Social dimensions of U.S. trade policies( )

15 editions published between 2000 and 2010 in English and held by 1,735 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The contributors to this volume include numerous members of the trade policy community who analyze and discuss the salient social dimensions of U.S. trade policies. These issues include the effects of trade on wage inequality; trade and immigration policy; U.S. trade adjustment assistance policies; the effects of NAFTA on environmental quality; the role of labor standards in U.S. trade policies; the economics of labor standards and the GATT; issues of child labor; and the role of interest groups in the design and implementation of U.S. trade policies. Chapter authors are Kyle Bagwell, Claude Barfield, George J. Borjas, Drusilla K. Brown, Alan V. Deardorff, Nancy Dunne, Gary S. Fields, John Kirton, Mike Jendrzejczyk, Phyllis Shearer Jones, Edward E. Leamer, Robert Naiman, Gregory K. Schoepfle, Robert W. Staiger, and Robert M. Stern. Commenters are Steve Beckman, Jagdish Bhagwati, Alan V. Deardorff, Avinash Dixit, Pharis Harvey, David van Hoogstraten, John H. Jackson, Lawrence Mishel, Jack Otero, J. David Richardson, Dani Rodrik, Mark Silbergeld, and T.N. Srinivasan. Alan V. Deardorff and Robert M. Stern are Professors of Economics and Public Policy, University of Michigan
Constituent interests and U.S. trade policies by Alan V Deardorff( )

13 editions published between 1998 and 2010 in English and held by 1,528 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Constituent Interests and U.S. Trade Policies analyzes the role that interest groups play in the design and implementation of U.S. trade policies. The papers and commentaries were commissioned for a conference, "Representation of Constituent Interests in the Design and Implementation of U.S. Trade Policies," whose twofold objective was to explore the role of interest groups in U.S. trade policies and to honor John and the late Gayle Sweetland for their generous gifts to the University of Michigan's Department of Economics - an endowed chair in international economics, commitments for three additional endowed chairs, and related financial assistance for graduate and undergraduate students
Comparative advantage, growth, and the gains from trade and globalization : a festschrift in honor of Alan V. Deardorff( )

11 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 1,377 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Alan Deardorff was 65 years old on June 6, 2009. To celebrate this occasion, a Festschrift in his honor was held on October 2-3, 2009, in the Rackham Amphitheater at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The Festschrift was entitled "Comparative Advantage, Economic Growth, and the Gains from Trade and Globalization: A Festschrift in Honor of Alan V Deardorff." It was co-organized by two of Professor Deardorff's former students, Drusilla Brown of Tufts University and Robert Staiger of Stanford University, together with Robert Stern representing the University of Michigan. The first day of the Festschrift involved a series of panels in which invited participants reflected on Professor Deardorff's contributions, including his writings on: comparative advantage; trade and growth; the gains from trade and globalization; and computational modeling and trade policy analysis. The panel participants prepared written comments, setting out their evaluation of Professor Deardorff's contributions combined with their own thoughts on the current state of knowledge and analysis of the particular topic. At the end of the first day, Paul Krugman of Princeton University and The New York Times delivered a Citigroup Foundation Special Lecture entitled "Reflections on Globalization: Yesteryear and Today." All of these papers and Krugman's lecture are contained in the volume
The Michigan model of world production and trade : theory and applications by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

13 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 412 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The impact of trade and domestic policy reforms in India : a CGE modeling approach( )

2 editions published between 1998 and 2010 in English and held by 314 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Major economic reforms undertaken since 1991 have brought the Indian economy into a new phase of development directed toward becoming globally competitive through the opening of trade, foreign investment, and technology inflows. The private sector is expected to play a lead role, with a corresponding reduction in the role played by the public sector. This book is aimed at analyzing the comparative static effects of selected post-1991 trade and domestic policy reforms on trade, factor prices, economic welfare, and the intersectoral allocation of resources. The study relies on a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model that has been specially designed to analyze the potential economic effects of India's policy reforms. The model was developed in a collaborative effort involving the National Council of Applied Economic Research in New Delhi and the University of Michigan. Patterned after the Michigan CGE Model of World Production and Trade that has been in use for more than two decades, the India CGE model features closer attention to special characteristics of India's economic structure, including more agricultural sector detail, allowance for state ownership, and administered pricing. The conclusions of the study suggest that the policy reforms will yield increased real returns to land, labor, and capital, and shift the terms of trade in favor of Indian agriculture. Lastly, not only are there efficiency-enhancing intersectoral shifts in resource allocation but there are notable increases in scale economies across the Indian manufacturing sectors. Rajesh Chadha and Sanjib Pohit are Economists at the National Council of Applied Economic Research in New Delhi. Alan V. Deardorff and Robert M. Stern are Professors of Economics and Public Policy, University of Michigan
Computational analysis of global trading arrangements by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

17 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in English and held by 293 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

New directions in trade theory by James Levinsohn( Book )

11 editions published between 1995 and 2003 in English and held by 266 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Leading specialists in international trade theory were asked to write on a new and different topic. Some responded by developing an idea that they had toyed with but never quite put together. Others offered a new and distinctive approach to an established topic. To respond to these adventurous and pioneering pieces, other eminent trade theorists prepared comments on each of the individual papers. Paul A. Samuelson wrote the keynote for the volume reflecting on the past and looking to the future of international trade theory
Analytical and negotiating issues in the global trading system by Conference on Analytical and Negotiating Issues in the Global Trading System( Book )

11 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 243 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Stolper-Samuelson theorem : a golden jubilee by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

13 editions published between 1993 and 1994 in English and Spanish and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem, this volume collects in one place the original Stolper-Samuelson articles as well as the most significant later contributions that interpret, extend, and test the basic result. It also includes reflective papers by both Wolfgang F. Stolper and Paul A. Samuelson, an overview of the literature, and an annotated bibliography
The past, present, and future of the European Union by International Economic Association( Book )

19 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 213 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Annotation
Determinants of bilateral trade : does gravity work in a neoclassical world? by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

17 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 104 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper derives bilateral trade from two cases of the Heckscher-Ohlin Model, both also representing a variety of other models as well. First is frictionless trade, in which the absence of all impediments to trade in homogeneous products causes producers and consumers to be indifferent among trading partners. Resolving this indifference randomly, expected trade flows correspond exactly to the simple frictionless gravity equation if preferences are identical and homothetic, or if demands are uncorrelated with supplies, and they depart from the gravity equation systematically when there are such correlations. In the second case, countries produce distinct goods, as in the H-O Model with complete specialization or a variety of other models, and preferences are either Cobb-Douglas or CES. Here trade tends to the standard gravity equation with trade declining in distance, with departures from it that depend on relative transport costs. Conclusions are, first, that even a simple gravity equation can be derived from standard trade theories, and second, that because the gravity equation characterizes many models, its use to test any of them is suspect
International provision of trade services, trade, and fragmentation by Alan V Deardorff( )

10 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and Undetermined and held by 103 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

February 2001 By reducing the costs of such trade services as transport, insurance, and finance, liberalizing trade in services can generate benefits in the markets for every kind of trade they facilitate. It can also stimulate the fragmentation of production of both goods and services, thus increasing international trade and the gains from trade even further. Deardorff examines the special role that trade liberalization in services industries can play in stimulating trade in both services and goods. International trade in goods requires inputs from such trade services as transportation, insurance, and finance, for example. Restrictions on services across borders and within foreign countries add costs and barriers to international trade. Liberalizing trade in services could also facilitate trade in goods, providing more benefits than one might expect from analysis merely of the services trade. To emphasize the point, Deardorff notes that the benefits for trade are arguably enhanced by the phenomenon of fragmentation. The more that production processes become split across locations, with the fragments tied together and coordinated by various trade services, the greater the gains from reductions in the costs of services. The incentives for such fragmentation can be greater across countries than within countries because of the greater differences in factor prices and technologies. But the service costs of international fragmentation can also be larger, especially if regulations and restrictions impede the international provision of services. As a result, trade liberalization in services can stimulate the fragmentation of production of both goods and services, thus increasing international trade and the gains from trade even further. Since fragmentation seems to characterize an increasing portion of world specialization, the importance of service liberalization is growing apace. This paper--a product of Trade, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to improve trade policy in goods and services. The author may be contacted at alandear@umich.edu
The effects of multinational production on wages and working conditions in developing countries by Drusilla K Brown( Book )

12 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper assesses the evidence regarding the effects of multinational production on wages and working conditions in developing countries. It is motivated by recent controversies concerning whether multinational firms in developing countries exploit workers by paying low wages and subjecting them to substandard conditions. We first address efforts of activist groups, universities, and colleges in the Anti-Sweatshop' Campaign in the United States, the social accountability of multinational firms, and the role of such international institutions as the International Labor Organization and World Trade Organization in dealing with labor standards and trade. We then consider conceptually how foreign direct investment might affect host-country wages. Available theories yield ambiguous predictions, leaving the effects to be examined empirically. We therefore, finally, review empirical evidence on multinational firm wages in developing countries, and the relationship between foreign direct investment and labor rights. This evidence indicates that multinational firms routinely provide higher wages and better working conditions than their local counterparts, and they are typically not attracted preferentially to countries with weak labor standards
An economic analysis of the effects of the Tokyo Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations on the United States and the other major industrialized countries : a report by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

4 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 53 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Prepared at the request of the Subcommittee on International Trade, Committee on Finance, United States Senate."--T.p
A computational analysis of alternative scenarios for multilateral trade liberalization by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

5 editions published in 1989 in English and held by 46 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The effects of U.S. trade laws on poverty in America by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

8 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 25 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Who makes the rules of globalization? presented at CESifo Venice Summer Institute, Workshop on Dissecting Globalization, July 2004 by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

6 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 21 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this paper I argue that profit-maximizing firms, even though they contribute to social welfare when they compete in the market, may not do so when they influence the political process. In particular, I suggest, through several examples from both the real world and from economic theory, that corporations have played a significant role in the formulation of the rules of the international trading system. They did this in the formation of the WTO, where they were responsible for the expansion to cover both intellectual property and services. And they do this in preferential trading arrangements such as the NAFTA, where they inserted the notorious Chapter 11 and specified rules of origin for automotive products. All of this is quite consistent with economic theory, including the literature on the political economy of trade policy. I also use a simple duopoly model to illustrate a domestic firms̕ interest in setting rules of origin. The corporate influence on rules need not be bad, but there is no reason why it should be good either, as these examples
What have we learned from linked econometric models? : a comparison of fiscal-policy simulations by Alan V Deardorff( Book )

8 editions published between 1978 and 1980 in English and Swedish and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Terms of trade : glossary of international economics
Covers
Measurement of nontariff barriersSocial dimensions of U.S. trade policiesConstituent interests and U.S. trade policiesComparative advantage, growth, and the gains from trade and globalization : a festschrift in honor of Alan V. DeardorffThe impact of trade and domestic policy reforms in India : a CGE modeling approachNew directions in trade theoryThe past, present, and future of the European Union
Alternative Names
Alan Deardorff economista estadounidense

Alan Deardorff économiste américain

Deardorff, A. V. 1944-

Deardorff, Alan 1944-

Deardorff, Alan V.

Deardorff, Alan Verne

Алън Диърдорф

ディアドルフ

Languages
English (261)

Spanish (1)

Swedish (1)