WorldCat Identities

Tolkien, Christopher

Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Christopher Tolkien
 
Most widely held works by Christopher Tolkien
The Silmarillion by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

260 editions published between 1977 and 2015 in 18 languages and held by 7,274 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From the Publisher: "Majestic! Readers of The Hobbit and The Lord Of The Rings will find The Silmarillion a cosmology to call their own medieval romances, fierce fairy tales and fiercer wars that ring with heraldic fury it overwhelms the reader." Those interested in J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle Earth should not be without this grand volume that tells the tragic tale of the struggle for control of the Silmarils, a struggle that would determine the history of the world long before the War of the Ring
The book of lost tales by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

180 editions published between 1983 and 2011 in 8 languages and held by 4,686 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Book of Lost Tales contains the first forms of the myths that came to be called The Silmarillion. These include early accounts of Gods and Elves, Dwarves, Balrogs, and Orcs; of the geography and cosmography of their invented world, J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth
Narn i chîn Húrin : the tale of the children of Húrin by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

60 editions published between 2007 and 2014 in 6 languages and held by 4,261 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A fantasy adventure saga set in the early days of Middle-Earth features humans and elves, dwarves and dragons, orcs and dark sorcerers clashing in an epic battle between good and evil
Unfinished tales of Numenor and Middle-earth by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

185 editions published between 1980 and 2014 in 14 languages and held by 4,175 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A collection of Tolkien's unpublished manuscripts dealing with events from the Elder Days of Middle-earth to the end of the War of the Rings
The letters of J.R.R. Tolkien by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

48 editions published between 1981 and 2010 in 6 languages and held by 2,529 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Selected letters discuss his books, their meanings, his interests and also reveal his view of the world
The legend of Sigurd and Gudrún by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

37 editions published between 2009 and 2013 in 6 languages and held by 2,082 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Tolkien's version of the great legend of Northern antiquity. In the first part, we follow the adventures of Sigurd, the slayer of Fafnir, and his betrothal to the Valkyrie Brynhild. In the second, the tragedy mounts to its end in the murder of Sigurd at the hands of his blood-brothers, the suicide of Brynhild, and the despair of Gudrún
The lays of Beleriand by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

46 editions published between 1985 and 2015 in 3 languages and held by 2,071 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Follows The Book of Lost Tales, parts 1 & 2, and precedes The Shaping of Middle-earth
The fall of Arthur by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

20 editions published between 2013 and 2015 in 5 languages and held by 1,554 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The first publication of a previously unknown narrative poem by J.R.R. Tolkien, which tells the extraordinary story of the final days of England's legendary hero, King Arthur
The return of the shadow by Christopher Tolkien( Book )

41 editions published between 1988 and 2015 in English and Spanish and held by 1,479 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this sixth volume of The History of Middle-earth the story reaches The Lord of the Rings. In The Return of the Shadow (an abandoned title for the first volume) Christopher Tolkien describes, with full citation of the earliest notes, outline plans, and narrative drafts, the intricate evolution of The Fellowship of the Ring and the gradual emergence of the conceptions that transformed what J.R.R. Tolkien for long believed would be a far shorter book, 'a sequel to The Hobbit'. The enlargement of Bilbo's 'magic ring' into the supremely potent and dangerous Ruling Ring of the Dark Lord is traced and the precise moment is seen when, in an astonishing and unforeseen leap in the earliest narrative, a Black Rider first rode into the Shire, his significance still unknown. The character of the hobbit called Trotter (afterwards Strider or Aragorn) is developed while his indentity remains an absolute puzzle, and the suspicion only very slowly becomes certainty that he must after all be a Man. The hobbits, Frodo's companions, undergo intricate permutations of name and personality, and other major figures appear in strange modes: a sinister Treebeard, in league with the Enemy, a ferocious and malevolent Farmer Maggot. The story in this book ends at the point where J.R.R. Tolkien halted in the story for a long time, as the Company of the Ring, still lacking Legolas and Gimli, stood before the tomb of Balin in the Mines of Moria. The Return of the Shadow is illustrated with reproductions of the first maps and notable pages from the earliest manuscripts
The treason of Isengard by Christopher Tolkien( Book )

35 editions published between 1989 and 2010 in English and Spanish and held by 1,387 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Treason of Isengard is the seventh volume in Christopher Tolkien's History of Middle-earth and the second in his account of the evolution of The Lord of the Rings. This book follows the long halt in the darkness of the Mines of Moria (which ended The Return of the Shadow) and traces the tale into new lands south and east of the Misty Mountains. Tolkien introduces us to Lothlorien, land of the elves, where we meet the Ents, the Riders of Rohan, and Saruman the White in the fortress of Isengard. In brief outlines and penciled drafts dashed down on scraps of paper are the first entry of Galadriel; the earliest ides of the history of Gondor; and the original meeting of Aragorn with Eowyn, its significance destined to be wholly transformed. Conceptions of what lay ahead dissolve as the story takes its own paths, as in the account of the capture of Frodo and his rescue by Sam Gamgee from Minas Morgul, written long before J.R.R. Tolkien actually reached that point in the writing of The Lord of the Rings. A chief feature of the book is a full account of the original Map, with drawings of successive phases, which was long the basis and accompaniment of the emerging geography of Middle-earth. An appendix describes the Runic alphabets of the time, with illustrations of the forms and an analysis of the Runes used in the Book of Mazarbul found beside Balin's tomb in Moria
The shaping of Middle-earth : the Quenta, the Ambarkanta, and the annals, together with the earliest 'Silmarillion' and the first map by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

39 editions published between 1986 and 2015 in 3 languages and held by 1,369 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is the fourth volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien, the first two comprising The Book of Lost Tales Parts One and Two, and the third The Lays of Beleriand. It has been given the title The Shaping of Middle-earth because the writings it includes display a great advance in the chronological and geographical structure of the legends of Middle-earth and Valinor. The hitherto wholly unknown "Ambarkanta," or Shape of the World, is the only account ever given of the nature of the imagined Universe, and it is accompanied by diagrams and maps of the world before and after the cataclysms of the War of the Gods and the Downfall of Numenor. The first map of Beleriand, in the North-west of Middle-earth, is also reproduced and discussed. In the "Annals of Valinor" and the "Annals of Beleriand" the chronology of the First Age is given shape; and with these are given the fragments of the translations into Anglo-Saxon made by Aelfwine, the Englishman who voyaged into the True West and came to Tol Eressea, the Lonely Isle, where he learned the ancient history of Elves and Men. Also included are the original "Silmarillion," written in 1926, from which all the later development proceeded, and the "Quenta Noldorinwa" of 1930, the only version of the myths and legends of the First Age that J.R.R. Tolkien completed to their end. As Christopher Tolkien continues editing the unpublished papers that form the bedrock from which The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion were quarried, the vastness of his father's accomplishment becomes even more extraordinary
The war of the ring by Christopher Tolkien( Book )

52 editions published between 1988 and 2010 in English and Spanish and held by 1,289 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In The War of the Ring Christopher Tolkien takes up the story of the writing of The Lord of the Rings with the Battle of Helm's Deep and the drowning of Isengard by the Ents. This is followed by an account of how Frodo, Sam and Gollum were finally brought to the Pass of Kirith Ungol, at which point J.R.R. Tolkien wrote at the time: 'I have got the hero into such a fix that not even an author will be able to extricate him without labour and difficulty'. Then comes the war in Gondor, and the book ends with the parley between Gandalf and the ambassador of the Dark Lord before the Black Gate of Mordor. In describing his intentions for The Return of the King J.R.R. Tolkien said that 'It will probably work out very differently from this plan when it really gets written, as the thing seems to write itself once it gets going'; and in The War of the Ring totally unforeseen developmenst that would become central to the narrative are seen at the moment of their emergence: the palantir bursting into fragments on the stairs of Orthanc, its nature as unknown to the author as to those who saw it fall, or the entry of Faramir into the story ('I am sure I did not invent him, though I like him, but there he came walking into the woods of Ithilien'). The book is illustrated with plans and drawings of the changing conceptions of Orthanc, Dunharrow, Minas Tirith and the tunnels of Shelob's Lair
The lost road and other writings : language and legend before "The lord of the rings" by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

38 editions published between 1987 and 2012 in 3 languages and held by 1,200 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the end of the 1937 J.R.R. Tolkien reluctantly set aside his now greatly elaborated work on the myths and heroic legends of Valinor and Middle-earth and began The Lord of the Rings. This fifth volume of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien, completes the presentation of the whole compass of his writing on those themes up to that time. Later forms of the Annuals of Valinor and the Annals of Berleriand had been composed, The Silmarillion was nearing completion in a greatly amplified version, and a new map had been made; the myth of the Music of the Ainur had become a separate work; and the legend of the Downfall of Numenor had already entered in a primitive form, introducing the cardinal ideas of the World Made Round and the Straight Path into the vanished West. Closely associated with this was the abandoned time-travel story, The Lost Road, which was to link the world of Numenor and Middle-earth with the legends of many other times and peoples. A long essay, The Lhammas, had been written on the ever more complex relations of the languages and dialects of Middle-earth; and an etymological dictionary had been undertaken, in which a great number of words and names in the Elvish languages were registered and their formation explained - thus providing by far the most extensive account of their vocabularies that has appeared
The monsters and the critics, and other essays by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

45 editions published between 1983 and 2013 in 7 languages and held by 1,166 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lezingen over taal- en letterkundige onderwerpen
Morgoth's ring : the later Silmarillion, part 1, the legends of Aman by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

35 editions published between 1993 and 2010 in English and Spanish and held by 1,053 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A collection of pieces discussing the legends of the Elder Days before the Hiding of Valinor, including the text of 'The Annals of Aman.'"
Beowulf : a translation and commentary : together with Sellic spell by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

18 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 943 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The translation of Beowulf by J.R.R. Tolkien was an early work, very distinctive in its mode, completed in 1926: he returned to it later to make hasty corrections, but seems never to have considered its publication. This edition is twofold, for there exists an illuminating commentary on the text of the poem by the translator himself, in the written form of a series of lectures given at Oxford in the 1930s; and from these lectures a substantial selection has been made, to form also a commentary on the translation in this book. The accompanying Sellic Spell is a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folk-tale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the historical legends of the Northern kingdoms
The war of the jewels : the later Silmarillion, part two, the legends of Beleriand by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

29 editions published between 1994 and 2010 in English and Spanish and held by 940 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In Volumes Ten and Eleven of The History of Middle-earth, Christopher Tolkien recounts from the original texts the evolution of his father's work on The Silmarillion, the legendary history of the Elder Days or First Age, from the completion of The Lord of the Rings in 1949 until J.R.R. Tolkien's death. In volume ten, Morgoth's Ring, the narrative was taken only as far as the natural dividing point in the work, when Morgoth destroyed the Trees of Light and fled from Valinor bearing the stolen Silmarils. In The War of the Jewels, the story returns to Middle-earth and the ruinous conflict of the High Elves and the Men who were their allies with the power of the Dark Lord. With the publication in this book of all J.R.R. Tolkien's later narrative writing concerned with the last centuries of the First Age, the long history of The Silmarillion, from its beginnings in The Book of Lost Tales, is completed; the enigmatic state of the work at his death can now be understood. A chief element in The War of the Jewels is a major story of Middle-earth, now published for the first time - a continuation of the great "saga" of Turin Turambar and his sister Nienor, the children of Hurin the Steadfast. This is the tale of the disaster that overtook the forest people of Brethil when Hurin came among them after his release from long years of captivity in Angband, the fortress of Morgoth. The uncompleted text of the Grey Annals, the primary record of the War of the Jewels, is given in full; the geography of Beleriand is studied in detail, with redrawings of the final state of the map; and a long essay on the names and relations of all the peoples of Middle-earth shows more clearly than any writing yet published the close connection between language and history in Tolkien's world. The text also provides new information, including some knowledge of the divine powers, the Valar
Sauron defeated : the end of the third age by Christopher Tolkien( Book )

28 editions published between 1992 and 2015 in English and held by 842 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This ninth volume in the history of Middle-earth brings to a conclusion the four books dealing The Lord of the Rings. Includes a never before published alternate ending to the masterpiece, Tolkien's long-lost time travel story, a description of the fall of Numenor, and the debut of Adunaic--Tolkien's 15th invented language
The peoples of Middle-earth by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

14 editions published between 1996 and 2010 in English and held by 699 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Study of the Appendices to "The Lord of the Rings," which contain the historical structure of the Second and Third Ages, with additional writings from Tolkien's later years offering new insights into his fictional world, and the abandoned beginnings of two other stories
Pictures by J.R.R. Tolkien by J. R. R Tolkien( Book )

7 editions published between 1979 and 1992 in English and held by 533 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Narn i chîn Húrin : the tale of the children of Húrin
Alternative Names
Christopher Tolkien britischer anglistischer und skandinavistischer Medivist, Autor, Sohn von J. R. R. Tolkien

Christopher Tolkien Brits schrijver

Christopher Tolkien escritor y editor britnico

Christopher Tolkien scrittore e editore britannico

Christopher Tolkien syn Johna Ronalda Reuela, redaktor jego książek

Tolkien, C. J. R.

Tolkien C. J. R. 1924-....

Tolkien, C.J.R. (Christopher J.R.)

Tolkien, Christopher John Reuel 1924-

Tolkien, Christopher Reuel

Tolkien Christopher Reuel 1924-....

Tolkien, Cristopher

Κρίστοφερ Τόλκιν

Кристофер Толкин

Кристофър Толкин

Крыстафер Толкін

Крыстафэр Толкін

Քրիսթոֆեր Թոլքին

כריסטופר טולקין

คริสโตเฟอร์ โทลคีน

クリストファ・トールキン

トールキン, クリストファ・ロウエル

克里斯托夫托爾金

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The book of lost talesNarn i chîn Húrin : the tale of the children of HúrinUnfinished tales of Numenor and Middle-earthThe letters of J.R.R. TolkienThe legend of Sigurd and GudrúnThe lays of BeleriandThe return of the shadowThe treason of Isengard