WorldCat Identities

Gutmann, Amy

Overview
Works: 89 works in 410 publications in 7 languages and 19,645 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Fiction 
Roles: Editor, Other, Author of introduction, Annotator, Originator, Interviewee, Composer, Translator
Classifications: E184.A1, 305.800973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Amy Gutmann Publications about Amy Gutmann
Publications by  Amy Gutmann Publications by Amy Gutmann
Most widely held works about Amy Gutmann
 
Most widely held works by Amy Gutmann
The lives of animals by J. M Coetzee ( Book )
19 editions published between 1999 and 2005 in English and held by 1,712 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The idea of human cruelty to animals so consumes novelist Elizabeth Costello in her later years that she can no longer look another person in the eye: humans, especially meat-eating ones, seem to her to be conspirators in a crime of stupefying magnitude taking place on farms and in slaughterhouses, factories, and laboratories across the world. Here the internationally renowned writer J.M. Coetzee uses fiction to present a powerfully moving discussion of animal rights in all their complexity. He draws us into Elizabeth Costello's own sense of mortality, her compassion for animals, and her alienation from humans, even from her own family. In his fable, presented as a Tanner Lecture sponsored by the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University, Coetzee immerses us in a drama reflecting the real-life situation at hand: a writer delivering a lecture on an emotionally charged issue at a prestigious university. As in the story of Elizabeth Costello, the Tanner Lecture is followed by responses treating the reader to a variety of perspectives, delivered by leading thinkers in different fields
Identity in democracy by Amy Gutmann ( )
20 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 1,577 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Written by one of America's leading political thinkers, this is a book about the good, the bad, and the ugly of identity politics. Amy Gutmann rises above the raging polemics that often characterize discussions of identity groups and offers a fair-minded assessment of the role they play in democracies. She addresses fundamental questions of timeless urgency while keeping in focus their relevance to contemporary debates: Do some identity groups undermine the greater democratic good and thus their own legitimacy in a democratic society? Even if so, how is a democracy to fairly distinguish between
A matter of interpretation : federal courts and the law : an essay by Antonin Scalia ( Book )
11 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 1,493 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"In exploring the neglected art of statutory interpretation, Antonin Scalia urges that judges resist the temptation to use legislative intention and legislative history. In his view, it is incompatible with democratic government to allow the meaning of a statute to be determined by what the judges think the lawgivers meant rather than by what the legislature actually promulgated. Eschewing the judicial law-making that is the essence of common law, judges should interpret statutes and regulations by focusing on the text itself. Scalia then extends this principle to constitutional law. He proposes that we abandon the notion of an ever changing Constitution and pay attention to the Constitution's original meaning. Although not subscribing to the "strict constructionism" that would prevent applying the Constitution to modern circumstances, Scalia emphatically rejects the idea that judges can properly "smuggle" in new rights or deny old rights by using the Due Process Clause, for instance. In fact, such judicial discretion might lead to the destruction of the Bill of Rights if a majority of the judges ever wished to reach that most undesirable of goals." "This essay is followed by four commentaries by Gordon Wood, Laurence Tribe, Mary Ann Glendon, and Ronald Dworkin, who engage Justice Scalia's ideas about judicial interpretation, and the volume concludes with a response by Scalia. Dealing with one of the most fundamental issues in American law, A Matter of Interpretation reveals what is at the heart of this important debate."--Jacket
Color conscious : the political morality of race by Anthony Appiah ( Book )
19 editions published between 1996 and 2001 in English and held by 1,438 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
In America today, the problem of achieving racial justice--whether through "color-blind" policies or through affirmative action--provokes more noisy name-calling than fruitful deliberation. In Color Conscious, K. Anthony Appiah and Amy Gutmann, two eminent moral and political philosophers, seek to clear the ground for a discussion of the place of race in politics and in our moral lives. Provocative and insightful, their essays tackle different aspects of the question of racial justice; together they provide a compelling response to our nation's most vexing problem. Appiah begins by establishing the problematic nature of the idea of race. He draws on the scholarly consensus that "race" has no legitimate biological basis, exploring the history of its invention as a social category and showing how the concept has been used to explain differences among groups of people by mistakenly attributing various "essences" to them. Appiah argues that, while people of color may still need to gather together, in the face of racism, under the banner of race, they need also to balance carefully the calls of race against the many other dimensions of individual identity; and he suggests, finally, what this might mean for our political life. Gutmann examines alternative political responses to racial injustice. She argues that American politics cannot be fair to all citizens by being color blind because American society is not color blind. Fairness, not color blindness, is a fundamental principle of justice. Whether policies should be color-conscious, class conscious, or both in particular situations, depends on an open-minded assessment of their fairness. Exploring timely issues of university admissions, corporate hiring, and political representation, Gutmann develops a moral perspective that supports a commitment to constitutional democracy. Appiah and Gutmann write candidly and carefully, presenting many-faceted interpretations of a host of controversial issues. Rather than supplying simple answers to complex questions, they offer to citizens of every color principled starting points for the ongoing national discussions about race
Democratic education by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
21 editions published between 1987 and 2001 in 3 languages and held by 1,369 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Who should have the authority to shape the education of citizens in a democracy? This is the central question posed by Amy Gutmann in the first book-length study of the democratic theory of education. The author tackles a wide range of issues, from the democratic case against book banning to the role of teachers' unions in education, as well as the vexed questions of public support for private schools and affirmative action in college admissions."--BOOK JACKET
Goodness & advice by Judith Jarvis Thomson ( )
12 editions published between 2001 and 2009 in English and held by 1,360 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"How should we live? What do we owe to other people? In Goodness and Advice, the eminent philosopher Judith Jarvis Thomson explores how we should go about answering such fundamental questions. In doing so, she makes major advances in moral philosophy, pointing to some deep problems for influential moral theories and describing the structure of a new and much more promising theory."--Jacket
Work and welfare by Robert M Solow ( Book )
15 editions published between 1998 and 2009 in English and Italian and held by 1,271 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Solow condemns the welfare reforms recently passed by Congress and President Clinton for confronting welfare recipients with an unworkable choice - finding work in the current labor market or losing benefits. He argues that the only practical and fair way to move recipients to work is, in contrast, through an ambitious plan to guarantee that every able-bodied citizen has access to a job. Solow contends that the demand implicit in the 1996 Welfare Reform Act for welfare recipients to find work in the existing labor market has two crucial flaws. Solow concludes that it is legitimate to want welfare recipients to work, but not to want them to live at a miserable standard or to benefit at the expense of the working poor, especially since children are often the first to suffer. Instead, he writes, we should create new demand for unskilled labor through public-service employment and incentives to the private sector - in effect, fair "workfare." Throughout, Solow places debate over welfare reform in the context of a struggle to balance competing social values, in particular self-reliance and altruism
Multiculturalism : examining the politics of recognition by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
22 editions published between 1992 and 2011 in English and held by 1,269 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Charles Taylor's initial inquiry, which considers whether the institutions of liberal democratic government make room - or should make room - for recognizing the worth of distinctive cultural traditions, remains the centerpiece of this discussion. It is now joined by Jurgen Habermas's extensive essay on the issues of recognition and the democratic constitutional state and by K. Anthony Appiah's commentary on the tensions between personal and collective identities, such as those shaped by religion, gender, ethnicity, race, and sexuality, and the dangerous tendency of multicultural politics to gloss over such tensions."--Jacket
Democracy and disagreement by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
25 editions published between 1996 and 2000 in English and held by 1,063 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Gutmann and Thompson show how a deliberative democracy can address some of our most difficult controversies - from abortion and affirmative action to health care and welfare - and can allow diverse groups separated by class, race, religion, and gender to reason together. Their work goes beyond that of most political theorists and social scientists by exploring both the principles for reasonable argument and their application to actual cases. Not only do the authors suggest how deliberative democracy can work, they also show why improving our collective capacity for moral argument is better than referring all disagreements to procedural politics or judicial institutions. Democracy and Disagreement presents a compelling approach to how we might resolve some of our most trying moral disagreements and live with those that will inevitably persist, on terms that all of us can respect
Human rights as politics and idolatry by Michael Ignatieff ( Book )
25 editions published between 2001 and 2011 in 3 languages and held by 1,056 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Based on the Tanner Lectures that Ignatieff delivered at Princeton University's Center for Human Values in 2000, the book includes two chapters by Ignatieff, an introduction by Amy Gutmann, comments by four leading scholars -- K. Anthony Appiah, David A. Hollinger, Thomas W. Laqueur, and Diane F. Orentlicher -- and a response by Ignatieff. Book jacket."--Jacket
Multiculturalism and "The politics of recognition" : an essay by Charles Taylor ( Book )
13 editions published between 1990 and 1999 in English and Swedish and held by 955 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Can a democratic society treat all its members as equals and also recognize their specific cultural identities? Should it try to ensure the survival of specific cultural groups? Is political recognition of ethnicity or gender essential to a person's dignity? These are some of the questions at the heart of the political controversy over multiculturalism and recognition - a debate that has raged across academic departments, university campuses, ethnic and feminist associations, and governments throughout the world. In this book Charles Taylor offers a historically informed, philosophical perspective on what is at stake in the demand made by many people for recognition of their particular group identities by public institutions. His thoughts serve as a point of departure for commentaries by other leading thinkers, who further relate the demand for recognition to issues of multicultural education, feminism, and cultural separatism."
Democracy and the welfare state ( Book )
9 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 834 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The essays in this volume explore the moral foundations and the political prospects of the welfare state in the United States. Among the questions addressed are the following: Has public support for the welfare state faded? Can a democratic state provide welfare without producing dependency on welfare? Is a capitalist (or socialist) economy consistent with the preservation of equal liberty and equal opportunity for all citizens? Why and in what ways does the welfare state discriminate against women? Can we justify limiting immigration for the sake of safeguarding the welfare of Americans? How can elementary and secondary education be distributed consistently with democratic values? The volume confronts powerful criticisms that have been leveled against the welfare state by conservatives, liberals, and radicals and suggests reforms in welfare state programs that might meet these criticisms." -- Back cover
Ethics and politics : cases and comments by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
26 editions published between 1984 and 2006 in English and German and held by 711 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The spirit of compromise : why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
8 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 694 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
If politics is the art of the possible, then compromise is the artistry of democracy. Unless one partisan ideology holds sway over all branches of government, compromise is necessary to govern for the benefit of all citizens. A rejection of compromise biases politics in favor of the status quo, even when the rejection risks crisis. Why then is compromise so difficult in American politics today? In this book, the authors connect the rejection of compromise to the domination of campaigning over governing, the permanent campaign, in American democracy today. They show that campaigning for political office calls for a mindset that blocks compromise, standing tenaciously on principle to mobilize voters and mistrusting opponents in order to defeat them. Good government calls for an opposite cluster of attitudes and arguments, the compromising mindset, that inclines politicians to adjust their principles and to respect their opponents. It is a mindset that helps politicians appreciate and take advantage of opportunities for desirable compromise. The authors propose changes in our political institutions, processes, and mindsets that would encourage a better balance between campaigning and governing
Why deliberative democracy? by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
11 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 684 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The most widely debated conception of democracy in recent years is deliberative democracy--the idea that citizens or their representatives owe each other mutually acceptable reasons for the laws they enact. Two prominent voices in the ongoing discussion are Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson. In Why Deliberative Democracy?, they move the debate forward beyond their influential book, Democracy and Disagreement. What exactly is deliberative democracy? Why is it more defensible than its rivals? By offering clear answers to these timely questions, Gutmann and Thompson illuminate the theory and practic
Liberal equality by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
9 editions published in 1980 in English and Undetermined and held by 660 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Freedom of association by Amy Gutmann ( Book )
7 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 506 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Multiculturalisme : différence et démocratie by Charles Taylor ( Book )
17 editions published between 1992 and 2010 in French and held by 301 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
La société démocratique et la reconnaissance des spécificités culturelles
Multikulturalismus und die Politik der Anerkennung by Charles Taylor ( Book )
11 editions published between 1993 and 2009 in German and held by 170 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Democratic education with a new preface and epilogue by Amy Gutmann ( )
6 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 70 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names
גוטמן, איימי
ガットマン, エイミー
Languages
English (265)
French (17)
German (12)
Spanish (5)
Swedish (3)
Japanese (2)
Italian (1)
Covers