WorldCat Identities

Maskell, Jack

Overview
Works: 98 works in 261 publications in 1 language and 4,788 library holdings
Genres: Rules  Privileges and immunities 
Roles: Author
Classifications: JK1108, 172.2
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Jack Maskell
Ethics manual for members and employees of the U.S. House of Representatives by United States( Book )

11 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 174 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Campaign activities by congressional employees by Jack Maskell( Book )

11 editions published between 1976 and 1997 in English and held by 160 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Overview of the independent counsel provisions of the Ethics in Government Act by Jack Maskell( Book )

10 editions published between 1986 and 1994 in English and held by 159 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ethics manual for members and employees of the U.S. House of Representatives by United States( Book )

8 editions published between 1979 and 1981 in English and held by 156 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Legal and congressional ethics : standards of relevance to those who lobby Congress by Jack Maskell( Book )

6 editions published between 1991 and 1992 in English and held by 111 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Lobbying regulations on non-profit organizations by Jack Maskell( Book )

8 editions published between 1996 and 2002 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Expulsion and censure actions taken by the full Senate against members by Jack Maskell( Book )

5 editions published between 1990 and 1993 in English and held by 94 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The congressional frank : statutory provisions, legislative history, judicial construction and some proposals for amending the law by Elizabeth Yadlosky( Book )

5 editions published between 1973 and 1980 in English and held by 69 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Prohibition on members of Congress contracting with the federal government by Jack Maskell( Book )

3 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977 : time for change? by Jack Maskell( Book )

3 editions published between 1980 and 1981 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Federal and state provisions concerning election crimes, offenses, and corrupt practices by Jack Maskell( Book )

5 editions published between 1973 and 1975 in English and held by 61 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Compilation of state and federal statutes pertaining to the registration and regulation of lobbyists by Jack Maskell( Book )

4 editions published between 1975 and 1978 in English and held by 59 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Constitutional analysis of "revolving door" proposal regarding expansion of post-employment conflicts of interest law for federal officials by Jack Maskell( Book )

2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Independent investigations of allegations of wrongdoing by members of Congress by Jack Maskell( Book )

3 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 58 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Legislative ethics in democratic countries : comparative analysis of financial standards( Book )

5 editions published between 1994 and 1997 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Congressional intervention in the administrative process : legal and ethical considerations by Morton Rosenberg( Book )

5 editions published between 1990 and 2008 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

When congressional committees engage in oversight of the administrative bureaucracy, or when Members of Congress intervene in agency proceedings on behalf of private constituents or other private entities with interests affecting the Members' constituency, such interventions involve varying degrees of intrusion into agency decisionmaking processes. This report will briefly examine the currently applicable legal and ethical considerations and standards that mark the limits of such intercessions. The report initially reviews the judicial development and application of standards for determining whether congressional pressure or influence will be deemed to have tainted an agency proceeding. It concludes that the courts, in balancing Congress's performance of its constitutional and statutory obligations to oversee the actions of agency officials against the rights of parties before agencies, have shown a decided predilection for protecting the congressional prerogatives. Thus where informal rulemaking or other forms of informal decisionmaking are involved, the courts will look to the nature and impact of the political pressure on the agency decisionmaker and will intervene only where that pressure has had the actual effect of forcing the consideration of factors Congress did not intend to make relevant. Where agency adjudication is involved a stricter standard is applied and the finding of an appearance of impropriety can be sufficient to taint the proceeding. But even here the courts have required that the pressure or influence be directed at the ultimate decisionmaker with respect to the merits of the proceeding and that it does not involve legitimate oversight and investigative functions, before they will intervene. The report next examines the conduct of Members of Congress and their staffs intervening in administrative matters from the perspective of ethics and conflict of interest rules, statutes and guidelines bearing upon a Member's and staffer's official duties. It notes that since congressional intervention and expressions of interest in administrative matters from a Member's office are recognized as legitimate, official representational and oversight functions and duties of Members of Congress, the primary focus of the ethical and statutory conduct restraints is limited to(1) any improper enrichment or financial benefit accruing to the Member in return for, or because of, his or her official actions and influences, including the receipt of gifts or payments, or existing financial interests in, or relating to the matter under consideration; and (2) any overt coercion or threats of reprisals, or promises of favoritism or reward to administrators from the Member's office which could indicate an arguable abuse of a Member's official representational or oversight role. Additionally, ethical guidelines in Congress incorporate an "appearance" standard for Members which would counsel a Member to adopt office procedures and systems which would prevent an appearance of a "linkage" between interventions and the receipt of things of value, particularly legitimate campaign contributions, and which would assure that decisions to intervene are based on the merits of a particular matter
Restrictions on lobbying Congress with federal funds by Jack Maskell( Book )

4 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 44 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Postponement and rescheduling of elections to federal office by Jack Maskell( Book )

5 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 32 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Status of a member of the House who has been indicted for or convicted of a felony by Jack Maskell( Book )

6 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 29 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

There are no federal statutes or Rules of the House of Representatives that directly affect the status of a Member of Congress who has been indicted for a crime that constitutes a felony. No rights or privileges are forfeited under the Constitution, statutory law, or the Rules of the House merely upon an indictment for an offense, prior to an establishment of guilt under the judicial system. Thus, under House Rules, an indicted Member may continue to participate in congressional proceedings and considerations; under the Constitution, a person under indictment is not disqualified from being a Member of or a candidate for re-election to Congress. Internal party rules the House, however, now require an indicted chairman or ranking Member of a House committee, or a member of the House party leadership, to temporarily step aside from his or her leadership or chairmanship position. Members of Congress, furthermore, do not automatically forfeit their offices upon conviction of a crime that constitutes a felony. No express constitutional disability or "disqualification" from Congress exists for the conviction of a crime, other than under the Fourteenth Amendment for certain treasonous conduct by someone who has taken an oath of office to support the Constitution. Members of the House are, however, instructed by House Rule not to vote in committee or on the House floor once they have been convicted of a crime for which the punishment may be two or more years imprisonment. Furthermore, under party rules, Members may lose their chairmanships of committees or ranking member status upon conviction of a felony. Conviction of certain crimes may subject -- and has subjected in the past -- Members of the House to internal legislative disciplinary proceedings, including resolutions of reprimand and censure, as well as expulsion from the House upon approval of two-thirds of the Members. Neither expulsion nor conviction of a crime (except for certain national security offenses) would lead to the forfeiture of a Member's federal pension
Congressional misconduct by Jack Maskell( Book )

5 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Congressional misconduct
Languages
English (114)

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