WorldCat Identities

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering

Overview
Works: 547 works in 598 publications in 1 language and 1,364 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Researcher, Other
Classifications: TD884.5, 662.66
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 
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Most widely held works by Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Combustion research on characterization of particulate organic matter from flames by R. A Hites( Book )

3 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and held by 92 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Combustion research on the fate of fuel-nitrogen under conditions of pulverized coal combustion by United States( Book )

3 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 91 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Basic studies of coal pyrolysis and hydrogasification by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( Book )

in English and held by 65 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Coal pyrolysis by hot solids from a fluidized bed combustor by John P Longwell( Book )

2 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and held by 64 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Experiments conducted with Texas lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coals, in both the presence and the absence of various dolomitic stones (including actual fluidized bed combustor stones) and under various experimental conditions, indicate the complete removal of the major sulfur compounds (e.g. H₂S and COS), the substantial decrease in the CO₂ level and the appreciable increase in the hydrogen, hydrocarbon and gas make of the gas product. The net result of all these observations is the production of an increased, clean, high heating value gas product. Quantitative analysis of the gas chromatography data were significantly improved. A detailed characterization of the two coals was established (including ultimate, proximate, BTU and Fisher assay with complete product balance). Similar characterizations and comparisons of the physical and chemical properties of the various dolomitic stones used were established. The previously unidentified compounds in the gas product (mainly sulfur compounds detected by the flame photometric detector) were all identified
Computer-aided industrial process design : the ASPEN project : functional specifications for ASPEN by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( Book )

4 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 55 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contribution from the Department of chemical Engineering by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( )

in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computer-aided industrial process design : the ASPEN project : ninth annual report for the period June 1, 1978 to August 31, 1978( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computer-aided industrial process design : the ASPEN project( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The objective of this project is to develop a computer-based process simulator and economic evaluation system for use in the engineering of fossil energy conversion processes. The system has been named ASPEN ( Advanced System for Process Engineering). It will provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with a rapid, efficient, and consistent means of performing its process evaluation functions. ASPEN will be capable of performing detailed material and energy balances, equipment sizing, and economic evaluation for processes such as coal gasification and liquefaction. It will be designed to meet the specialized requirements of fossil energy conversion processes, including an extensive data base for coal physical properties, compatibility with conversion reactor models currently available and/or being constructed, and the capability of handling steams containing solids
Coal devolatilization information for reactor modeling : assessment of data and apparatus availability with recommendations for research( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Detailed simulation of a moving-bed gasifier( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The improbable achievement : Chemical engineering at MIT( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final topical report on heat transfer to superheated steam at high pressure by W. H McAdams( Book )

2 editions published in 1949 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final topical technical report on heat transfer at high rates to water with surface boiling by W. H McAdams( Book )

2 editions published in 1948 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Macrostatistical hydrodynamics( )

5 editions published between 1992 and 1994 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This research aims to correlate the macroscopic rheological behavior of suspensions with their statistical microstructure. This fundamental knowledge will benefit a host of technologies, including geothermal energy production, petroleum production and refining, and synfuels processing. The approach involves a novel combination of experiments, numerics, and theory. Experiments primarily involve tracking small balls as they fall slowly through otherwise quiescent suspensions of neutrally buoyant particles. Detailed trajectories of the balls, obtained either with new experimental techniques or by numerical simulation, are statistically interpreted in terms of the mean settling velocity and the dispersion about the mean. Determining the mean settling velocity of balls that are small relative to the suspended particles is a means of measuring the macroscopic zero-shear-rate viscosity without significantly disturbing the original microstructure; therefore, falling-ball rheometry is a powerful tool for use in studying the effects of microstructure on the macroscopic properties of suspensions. The dispersion about the mean yields information about the particle interactions. To date, the mean and dispersivity of a falling sphere's velocity has been determined as a function of the tracer sphere size and the suspended particle size, shape, and concentration. Currently, the pressure drop caused by the falling ball is being measured also. This will provide a much needed benchmark problem for numerical studies, as well as provide another measure of the macroscopic response of a suspension as a function of its microstructure. Also begun recently are two studies of boundary effects in two-phase fluids: the determination of the torque on a small ball spinning in a suspension and the determination of the velocity of a small ball rolling down the wall of a container holding a suspension
An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis : Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst. Final technical report( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO₂ Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al₂O₃ water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO₂ to Cu-ZnO/Al₂O₃ of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240°C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H₂/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al₂O₃ catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220°C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H₂/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization
Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, October--December 1992( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for direct NO decomposition in post-combustion NO(subscript x) control. Since the process does not use a reductant, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports by ion exchange. Catalysts of primary interest include Cu, Pd, Ag, and Ni exchanged zeolites. Particular emphasis is given on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst system Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and a few others, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas O₂ and NO levels and over the temperature range of 723--873K. Effects of zeolite modification, Cu exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalyst activity are studied in a packed-bed microreactor. Temperature-programmed desorption and reduction experiments will be carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a single-particle electrodynamic balance. Kinetic studies of NO and O₂ interaction with catalysts over a wide temperature range as well as catalyst structural investigations are planned
Morphological changes during oxidation of a single char particle. Quarterly progress report, April 30, 1992( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this study, the changes with conversion in morphology of a carbon char in the temperature range 500--1200 K are followed by using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) (Spjut et al., 1985; Dudek, 1988; Bar-ziv et al., 1989). This device allows one to measure in situ, over temperature range wider than in other apparatuses, mass, diameter, density, surface area, rate of reaction and temperature for a single, suspended submillimeter particle. By following with the EDB the changes in the char as it reacts, it is possible to study the influence of the porous texture on the reaction behavior and shed some light on the contribution by micropores to the reaction in the chemical kinetic controlled regime
Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide( )

5 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This project will investigate a suitable catalyst system for the direct NO decomposition, for post-combustion NO. control. The proposed process will not use a reductant, such as ammonia in case of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) process for catalytic reduction of NO(subscript x) to nitrogen. This is a simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter, thus avoiding problems generally associated with the commercial Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) process, namely high operating cost, ammonia slip, and potential N₂0 emissions. A brief description of the proposed work is as follows: Catalysts will be prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports according to ion exchange procedures widely used in preparation of metal/zeolite catalysts. Zeolites will be modified to improve catalytic activity, by blocking ion exchange sites in the small pores of zeolites with promoter cations of high valence. The catalysts of primary interest include copper (Cu), palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), silver (Ag), and nickel (Ni) exchanged zeolites
Effects of catalytic mineral matter on CO( )

8 editions published between 1990 and 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We have extended our recently reported method for determining the surface area of single microporous particles, Dudek et al., 1989 using an electrodynamic chamber (EDC) by increasing the operating pressures from 1 at to 25 at. The value of total surface area is determined from adsorption measurements of CO₂ assuming monolayer adsorption. Measurements of CO₂ desorption were also carried out to yield a point to point difference from the adsorption measurements of about 1%. Adsorption-desorption cycles were carried out for 10 particles to yield a scatter of less than 5% in the measured value for saturation adsorption. The major advantage of using high pressure measurements for evaluating the saturation value for CO₂ adsorption is the improved accuracy of the extrapolation procedure. Previous measurements with the EDC at atmospheric pressure, Dudek, et al., 1989, yielded values for the surface area for similar particles of comparable value with a relative error of about 15%. The results of the high pressure measurements are however bounded with an error of about 3%. Also, the equilibrium adsorption-desorption coefficient was found with a high accuracy, whereas from atmospheric measurements it was not practical to obtain an accurate value
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityMassachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Chemical Engineering

Languages
English (62)