WorldCat Identities

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering

Overview
Works: 430 works in 468 publications in 1 language and 1,223 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Researcher
Classifications: TD884.5, 662.66
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 
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Most widely held works by Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Combustion research on characterization of particulate organic matter from flames by R. A Hites( Book )

3 editions published between 1978 and 1979 in English and held by 91 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Combustion research on the fate of fuel-nitrogen under conditions of pulverized coal combustion by United States( Book )

3 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 89 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Basic studies of coal pyrolysis and hydrogasification by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( Book )

in English and held by 63 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Coal pyrolysis by hot solids from a fluidized bed combustor by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( Book )

in English and held by 62 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computer-aided industrial process design : the ASPEN project : functional specifications for ASPEN by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( Book )

4 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 52 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Contribution from the Department of chemical Engineering by Massachusetts Institute of Technology( )

in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computer-aided industrial process design : the ASPEN project : ninth annual report for the period June 1, 1978 to August 31, 1978( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Detailed simulation of a moving-bed gasifier( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Computer-aided industrial process design : the ASPEN project : second annual report for the period June 1, 1977 to May 30, 1978( Book )

1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Coal devolatilization information for reactor modeling : assessment of data and apparatus availability with recommendations for research( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The improbable achievement : Chemical engineering at MIT( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Design strategy for the combustion of coal-derived liquid fuels( Book )

1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final topical report on heat transfer to superheated steam at high pressure by W. H McAdams( Book )

2 editions published in 1949 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final topical technical report on heat transfer at high rates to water with surface boiling by W. H McAdams( Book )

2 editions published in 1948 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall Slip boundary conditions( )

2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere 'rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip
Direct catalytic decomposition of nitric oxide( )

3 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This project investigates a suitable catalyst system for direct NO decomposition in post-combustion NO[sub x] control. Since the process does not use a reductant, it is a greatly simplified process basically involving passing the flue gas through a catalytic converter. Catalysts are prepared by incorporating metal cations into zeolite supports by ion exchange. Catalysts of primary interest include Cu, Pd, Ag, and Ni exchanged zeolites. Particular emphasis is given on promoted Cu-exchanged zeolites, especially the catalyst system Mg/Cu-ZSM-5 and a few others, which are promising for NO conversion to nitrogen at typical flue gas O[sub 2] and NO levels and over the temperature range of 723--873K. Effects of zeolite modification, Cu exchange level and catalyst preparation conditions on the catalyst activity are studied in a packed-bed microreactor. Temperature-programmed desorption and reduction experiments will be carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a single-particle electrodynamic balance. Kinetic studies of NO and O[sub 2] interaction with catalysts over a wide temperature range as well as catalyst structural investigations are planned
An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst. Final technical report( )

2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO₂ Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al₂O₃ water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO₂ to Cu-ZnO/Al₂O₃ of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240°C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H₂/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al₂O₃ catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220°C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H₂/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization
Macrostatistical hydrodynamics( )

2 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This research aims to correlate the macroscopic rheological behavior of suspensions with their statistical microstructure. This fundamental knowledge will benefit a host of technologies, including geothermal energy production, petroleum production and refining, and synfuels processing. The approach involves a novel combination of experiments, numerics, and theory. Experiments primarily involve tracking small balls as they fall slowly through otherwise quiescent suspensions of neutrally buoyant particles. Detailed trajectories of the balls, obtained either with new experimental techniques or by numerical simulation, are statistically interpreted in terms of the mean settling velocity and the dispersion about the mean. Determining the mean settling velocity of balls that are small relative to the suspended particles is a means of measuring the macroscopic zero-shear-rate viscosity without significantly disturbing the original microstructure; therefore, falling-ball rheometry is a powerful tool for use in studying the effects of microstructure on the macroscopic properties of suspensions. The dispersion about the mean yields information about the particle interactions. To date, the mean and dispersivity of a falling sphere's velocity has been determined as a function of the tracer sphere size and the suspended particle size, shape, and concentration. Currently, the pressure drop caused by the falling ball is being measured also. This will provide a much needed benchmark problem for numerical studies, as well as provide another measure of the macroscopic response of a suspension as a function of its microstructure. Also begun recently are two studies of boundary effects in two-phase fluids: the determination of the torque on a small ball spinning in a suspension and the determination of the velocity of a small ball rolling down the wall of a container holding a suspension
The role of pore structure on char reactivity( )

2 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The principal areas being looked at currently are using the fluidized bed for large particles and thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TA) for soot reactions. The fluidized bed will be used to work on the large particles. Early on, it was decided that only one particle would be examined, that it should be removable at any point in the reaction, and that a continuous CO[sub 2] analyzer be used to give better resolution in the bed. The soot particles needed to test the TA are being examined and modified to meet our needs. Since we wish to examine the evolution of the distance between graphite planes as the soot reacts, we felt that slight graphitization needed to take place in order to give good X-ray diffraction results. The corresponding TEM pictures of the soots at for the base soot and after 1500[degrees]C graphitization are shown in Figures 1 and 2. As can be seen, there as a fairly substantial amount of graphitization by 1500[degrees]C, as expected from Busek's work
 
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Alternative Names

controlled identityMassachusetts Institute of Technology

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Chemical Engineering

Languages
English (49)