WorldCat Identities

Marr, David 1945-1980

Overview
Works: 32 works in 106 publications in 3 languages and 2,923 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: QP475, 152.1402854
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about David Marr
 
Most widely held works by David Marr
Vision : a computational investigation into the human representation and processing of visual information by David Marr( Book )

41 editions published between 1982 and 2010 in 3 languages and held by 1,279 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this work, Marr describes a general framework for understanding visual perception and touches on broader questions about how the brain and its functions can be studied and understood
Early processing of visual information by David Marr( Book )

8 editions published between 1975 and 1976 in English and Undetermined and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The article describes a symbolic approach to visual information proessing, and set out four principles that appear to govern the design of comples symbolic information processing systems. A computational theory of early visual information is presented, which extends to about the level of figure-ground separation. It includes a process-oriented theory of texture vision. Most of the theory has been implemented, and examples are shown of the analysis of several natural images. This replaces AIM-324 and AIM 334
A life by David Marr( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Theory of edge detection by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A theory of edge detection is presented. (1) Intensity changes, which occur in a natural image over a wide range of scales, are detected separately at different scales. At a given scale, this is best done by finding the zero-crossings of gradient-squared G(x, y) * (I(x, y) for image I, where G(x, y) is a two-dimensional gaussian distribution, and gradient-squared is the Laplacian. (2) The physical phenomena that give rise to the intensity changes are localized. This allows one to construct rules for combining information from the different scales into a primitive description of the image. A physiological model for zero-crossing detection is proposed. (Author)
The recognition of sharp, closely spaced edges by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The recognition of sharp edges from edge- and bar-mask convolutions with an image is studied for the special case where the separation of the edges is of the order of the masks' panel-widths. Desmearing techniques are employed to separate the items in the image. Attention is also given to parsing de-smeared mask convolutions into edges and bars; to detecting edge and bar terminations; and to the detection of small blobs
On the purpose of low-level vision by David Marr( Book )

3 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The article advances the thesis that the purpose of low-level vision is to encode symbolically all of the useful information contained in an intensity array, using a vocabulary of very low-level symbols. Subsequent processes should have access only to this symbolic description. The reason is one of computational expediency. It allows the low-level processes to run almost autonomously; and it greatly simplifies the application of criteria to an image, whose representation in terms of conditions on the initial intensities, or on simple measurements made from them, is very cumbersome
A note on the computation of binocular disparity in a symbolic, low-level visual processor by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The goals of the computation that extracts disparity from pairs of pictures of a scene are defined, and the constraints imposed upon that computation by the three-dimensional structure of the world are shown to be inadequate. A precise expression of the goals of the computation is possible in a low-level symbolic visual processor: the constraints translate in this environment to pre-requisites on the binding of disparity values to low-level symbols. The outline of a method based on this is given
The low-level symbolic representation of intensity changes in an image by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A family of symbols is defined by which much of the useful information in an image may be represented, and its choice is justified. The family includes symbols for the various commonly occurring intensity profiles that are associated with the edges of objects, and symbols for the gradual luminance changes that provide clues about a surface's shape. It is shown that these descriptors may readily be computed from measurements similar to those made by simple cells in the visual cortex of the cat. (Author)
Representation and recognition of the spatial organization of three dimensional shapes by David Marr( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The human visual process can be studied by examining the computational problems associated with deriving useful information from retinal images. In this paper, we apply this approach to the problem of representing three- dimensional shapes for the purpose of recognition. Three criteria, accessibility, scope and uniqueness, and stability and sensitivity, are presented for judging the usefulness of a representation for shape recognition. Three aspects of a representation's design are considered, use an object-centered coordinate system, include volumetric primitives of varied sizes, and have a modular organization. A representation based on a shape's natural axes (for example the axes identified by a stick figure) follows directly from these choices. The basic process for deriving a shape description in this representation must involve: a means for identifying the natural axes of a shape in its image and a mechanism for transforming viewer-centered axis specifications in an object-centered coordinate system. (Author)
A theory of human stereo vision by David Marr( Book )

3 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An algorithm is proposed for solving the stereoscopic matching problem. The algorithm consists of five steps: (1) Each image is filtered with bar masks of four sizes that vary with eccentricity; the equivalent filters are about one octave wide. (2) Zero-crossings of the mask values are localized, and positions that correspond to terminations are found; (3) For each mask size, matching takes place between paris of zero-crossings or terminations of the same sign in the two images, for a range of disparities up to about the width of the mask's central region; (4) Wide masks can control vergence movements, thus causing small masks to come into correspondence; and (5) When a correspondence is achieved, it is written into a dynamic buffer, called the 2-1/2-D sketch. It is shown that this proposal provides a theoretical framework for most existing psychophysical and neurophysiological data about stereopsis. Several critical experimental predictions are also made, for instance about the size of Panum's area under various conditions. The results of such experiments would tell us whether, for example, cooperativity is necessary for the fusion process
Spatial disposition of axes in a generalized cylinder representation of objects that do not encompass the viewer by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

It is proposed that the 3-D representation of an object is represented primarily by a stick-figure configuration, where each stick represents one or more axes in the object's generalized cylinder representation. The loosely hierarchical description of a stick figure is interpreted by a special-purpose processor, able to maintain two vector and the gravitational vertical relative to a Cartesian space-frame. It delivers information about the appearance of these vectors
Analyzing natural images : a computational theory of texture vision by David Marr( Book )

4 editions published in 1975 in English and Undetermined and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A theory of early and intermediate visual information processing is given, which extends to about the level of figure-ground separation. Its core is a computational theory of texture vision. Evidence obtained from perceptual and from computational experiments is adduced in its support. A consequence of the theory is that high-level knowledge about the world influences visual processing later and in a different way from that currently practiced in machine vision
Cooperative computation of stereo disparity by David Marr( Book )

3 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The extraction of stereo disparity information from two images depends upon establishing a correspondence between them. This article analyzes the nature of the correspondence computation, and derives a cooperative algorithm that implements it. It is show that this algorithm successfully extracts information from random-dot stereograms, and its implications for the psychophysics and neurophysiology of the visual system are briefly discussed
Some comments on a recent theory of stereopsis by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

From understanding computation to understanding neural circuitry by David Marr( Book )

1 edition published in 1976 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The CNS needs to be understood at four nearly independent levels of description: (1) that at which the nature of a computation is expressed; (2) that at which the algorithms that implement a computation are characterized; (3) that at which an algorithm is committed to particular mechanisms; and (4) that at which the mechanisms are realized in hardware. In general, the nature of a computation is determined by the problem to be solved, the mechanisms that are used depend upon the available hardware, and the particular algorithms chosen depend on the problem and on the available mechanisms. Examples are given of theories at each level. (Author)
Representation and recognition of the movements of shapes by David Marr( Book )

3 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The problems posed by the representation and recognition of the movements of 3-D shapes are analyzed. A representation is proposed for the movements of shapes that lie within the scope of Marr and Nishihara's (1978) 3-D model representation of static shapes. The basic problem is, how to segment a stream of movement into pieces each of which can be described separately. The representation proposed here is based upon segmenting a movement at moments when a component axis, e.g. an arm, starts to move relative to its local coordinate frame (here, the torso). So that for example walking is divided into a sequence of the stationary states between each swing of the arms and legs, and the actual motions between the stationary points (relative to the torso, not the ground). This representation is called the state-motion-state (SMS) moving shape representation, and several examples of its application are given. (Author)
Bijon( Book )

3 editions published in 1987 in Japanese and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An essay on the primate retina by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Directional selectivity and its use in early visual processing by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The construction of directionally selective units, and their use in the processing of visual motion, are considered. The zero-crossings of Delta 2G(x, y)-I(x, y) are located, as in Marr & Hildreth (1979). In addition, the time derivative d/dt Delta 2G(x, y)-I(x, y) is measured at the zero-crossings, and serves to constraint the local direction of motion to within 180 degrees. The direction of motion is determined in a second stage by combining the local constraints. The second part of the paper suggests a specific model of the information processing carried out by the X and Y cells of the retina and the LGN, and certain classes of cortical simple cells. A number of psychophysical and neurophysiological predictions are derived from the theory. (Author)
Analysis of a cooperative stereo algorithm by David Marr( Book )

2 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Marr and Poggio (1976) recently described a cooperative algorithm that solves the correspondence problem for stereopsis. This article uses a probabilistic technique to analyze the convergence of that algorithm, and derives the conditions governing the stability of the solution state. The actual results of applying the algorithm to random-dot stereograms are compared with the probabilistic analysis. A satisfactory mathematical analysis of the asymptotic behavior of the algorithm is possible for a suitable choice of the parameter values and loading rules, and again the actual performance of the algorithm under these conditions is compared with the theoretical predictions. Finally, some problems raised by the analysis of this type of 'cooperative' algorithm are briefly discussed. (Author)
 
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Vision : a computational investigation into the human representation and processing of visual information
Alternative Names
David Marr Brits wiskundige

David Marr englischer Psychologe, Informatiker und Mathematiker

Marr, David C. 1945-1980

Marr, David Courtnay

Marr, David Courtnay 1945-1980

Марр, Дэвид Кортни

데이비드 마아

デビッド・マー

マー, デビッド

大衛·馬爾

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