WorldCat Identities

Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 370 works in 754 publications in 1 language and 28,240 library holdings
Classifications: KF8896, 346.7308600269
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.) Publications about Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.)
Publications by Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.) Publications by Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.)
Most widely held works about Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.)
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Most widely held works by Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.)
Insurance class actions in the United States by Nicholas M Pace ( )
6 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1,347 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Class actions, which are civil cases in which parties initiate a lawsuit on behalf of other plaintiffs not specifically named in the complaint, often make headlines and arouse policy debates. However, policymakers and the public know little about most class actions. This book presents the results of surveys of insurers and of state departments of insurance to learn more about class litigation against insurance companies
The economic burden of providing health insurance how much worse off are small firms? by Christine Eibner ( )
4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,336 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
More than 60 percent of nonelderly Americans receive health-insurance (HI) coverage through employers. However, rising health-care costs may threaten the long-term viability of the employer-based insurance system. This report explores trends in the economic burden associated with HI provision for small and large businesses, as well as the quality of plans that small and large firms offer
Class action dilemmas : pursuing public goals for private gain by Deborah R Hensler ( )
5 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 515 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Class action lawsuits--allowing one or a few plaintiffs to represent many who seek redress--have long been controversial. The current controversy, centered on lawsuits for money damages, is characterized by sharp disagreement among stakeholders about the kinds of suits being filed, whether plaintiffs' claims are meritorious, and whether resolutions to class actions are fair or socially desirable. Ultimately, these concerns lead many to wonder, "Are class actions worth their costs to society and to business? Do they do more harm than good?" To describe the landscape of current damage class action litigation, elucidate problems, and identify solutions, the RAND Institute for Civil Justice conducted a study using qualitative and quantitative research methods. The researchers concluded that the controversy over damage class actions has proven intractable because it implicates deeply held but sharply contested ideological views among stakeholders. Nevertheless, many of the political antagonists agree that class action practices merit improvement. The authors argue that both practices and outcomes could be substantially improved if more judges would supervise class action litigation more actively and scrutinize proposed settlements and fee awards more carefully. Educating and empowering judges to take more responsibility for case outcomes--and ensuring that they have the resources to do so--can help the civil justice system achieve a better balance between the public goals of class actions and the private interests that drive them
Compensation for accidental injuries in the United States by Deborah R Hensler ( Book )
10 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 432 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
One in every six Americans sustains an injury in an accident that results in measurable economic loss, and about one-third of those victims suffer a moderate to very severe injury that imposes significant costs on them and on society. The United States has developed a loose network of public and private programs designed to help alleviate the costs those losses impose by providing compensation to accident victims. This network includes private insurance, publicly subsidized programs like Medicare, work-related programs like workers' compensation, and the fault-based tort liability system. These programs have come under increasing scrutiny, as has the compensation network as a whole. This report evaluates the total system of compensation by examining the role of individual compensation mechanisms; investigating the experience of individual American households; and examining the ways experiences vary by accident, injury, and sociodemographic circumstances. Specifically, it presents the results of the first phase of analysis of data collected in a large, nationally representative survey, the purpose of which was to describe the universe of accidents and injuries the authors studied, develop estimates of costs and compensation, describe the liability claiming process, and examine the correlates of liability claiming
Just, speedy, and inexpensive? : an evaluation of judicial case management under the Civil Justice Reform Act by James S Kakalik ( Book )
4 editions published between 1996 and 1997 in English and held by 403 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) required each federal district court to develop a case management plan to reduce costs and delay. The legislation also created a pilot program to test six principles of case management, and required an independent evaluation to assess their effects. This executive summary provides an overview of the purpose of the CJRA, the basic design of the evaluation, the key findings, and their policy implications. Detailed results appear in three other reports: MR-801-ICJ, which traces the stages in the implementation of the CJRA in the study districts; MR-802-ICJ, which presents the main descriptive and statistical evaluation of how the CJRA case management principles implemented in the study districts affected cost, time to disposition, and participants' satisfaction and views of fairness; and MR-803-ICJ, which describes the results of an evaluation of mediation and neutral evaluation designed to supplement the alternative dispute resolution assessment contained in the main CJRA evaluation
An evaluation of mediation and early neutral evaluation under the Civil Justice Reform Act ( Book )
4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 374 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) required each federal district court to develop a case management plan to reduce costs and delay. The legislation also created a pilot program to test six principles of case management, and required an independent evaluation to assess their effects. This report is one of four documents describing the evaluation, which was conducted by RAND's Institute for Civil Justice. The report describes an assessment of the effects of six different alternative dispute resolution (ADR) programs that included mediation and early neutral evaluation. The study found that, once litigation had begun, referral to ADR was not a panacea, nor was it detrimental. Neither time nor costs nor lawyer views of satisfaction or fairness changed significantly as a result of referral to any of these programs; however, lawyers and litigants who participated in the programs liked them. The only statistically significant finding was that cases referred to ADR were more likely to have a monetary outcome. See also MR-800-ICJ, MR-801-ICJ, and MR-802-ICJ
Implementation of the Civil Justice Reform Act in pilot and comparison districts ( Book )
3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 369 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) required each federal district court to develop a case management plan to reduce costs and delay. The legislation also created a pilot program to test six principles of case management, and required an independent evaluation to assess their effects. This report is one of four documents describing the evaluation, which was conducted by RAND's Institute for Civil Justice. The report traces the stages in the CJRA implementation: the recommendations of the advisory groups, the plans adopted by the districts, and the plans actually implemented. The study found that all pilot districts complied with the statutory language of the act. But the amount of change varied widely, and in some districts, planned changes were not fully implemented. However, implementing the pilot plans may have heightened the consciousness of judges and lawyers and brought about some important implicit shifts in their approach to case management. See also MR-800-ICJ, MR-802-ICJ, and MR-803-ICJ
An evaluation of judicial case management under the Civil Justice Reform Act ( Book )
3 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 364 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Civil Justice Reform Act of 1990 (CJRA) required each federal district court to develop a case management plan to reduce costs and delay. The legislation also created a pilot program to test six principles of case management, and required an independent evaluation to assess their effects. This report is one of four documents describing the evaluation, which was conducted by RAND's Institute for Civil Justice. The report describes the effects of the CJRA case management principles on time to disposition, costs, and participants' satisfaction and views of fairness. The study found that the CJRA's package of case management policies, as implemented, had little effect on any of these outcomes. However, what judges do to manage cases does matter. A package of procedures containing early judicial management, early setting of a trial date, and shorter time to discovery cutoff could reduce time to disposition by 30 percent, with no change in litigation costs, satisfaction, or perceived fairness. See also MR-800-ICJ, MR-801-ICJ, and MR-803-ICJ
Punitive damages : empirical findings by Mark A Peterson ( Book )
5 editions published between 1985 and 1987 in English and held by 364 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Based on cases that reached jury verdict in Cook County, Illinois, and San Francisco, California, from 1960 to 1984, this report presents analytically derived answers to questions surrounding the award of punitive damages: (1) how frequently punitive damages are awarded in civil suits, (2) what types of cases and defendants are most subject to such awards, and (3) what proportion of the monies awarded in punitive damages is actually paid out. The findings confirm trends for which there had only been anecdotal evidence: The incidence of punitive damage awards (measured by proportion of cases in which such awards are made) and the amount of money (measured in constant 1984 dollars) awarded for punitive purposes have increased substantially over the years. Corporate defendants are in fact more likely than individuals or public agencies to be the target of such awards. Many damage awards are significantly reduced and only about half of the dollars awarded are ultimately paid subsequent to award at the trial court level
Designing safer products : corporate responses to product liability law and regulation by George C Eads ( Book )
5 editions published between 1983 and 1985 in English and held by 362 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Analyzes ways in which firms have responded to recent changes in pressures to design safer products, using interviews with product safety officials in major manufacturers and extensive analysis of legal and scholarly literatures. Shifts to strict liability and more stringent regulation during the last 15 years have increased pressure to invest in safety assurance procedures, as evidenced by creation of new corporate product safety units. Regulation has been of more questionable effectiveness than has strict liability in inducing better design practices. Argues that federal product liability legislation will have marginal effect, despite the current variation in state law on the matter. Discusses the factors that influence the effectiveness of corporate product safety units and suggests that combining product safety with quality assurance may be the optimal strategy for a firm
Costs and compensation paid in tort litigation by James S Kakalik ( Book )
4 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 357 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This study was undertaken to answer the following questions: What was the total expenditure nationwide for tort litigation terminated in state and federal courts of general jurisdiction in 1985? How much of the total was spent for the various costs of the tort litigation system: plaintiffs' and defendants' legal fees and other litigation expenses, the value of litigants' time spent on the lawsuits, the value of time spent by insurance personnel, and the costs of operating the courts? How much of the total was net compensation to plaintiffs? How do litigation costs and compensation paid differ for torts involving motor vehicles and for all other torts? How fast is the tort system growing? The study indicates that plaintiffs with tort lawsuits in state and federal courts of general jurisdiction received approximately half of the $27 billion to $34 billion spent in 1985. The costs of litigation consumed the other half
Trends in civil jury verdicts since 1985 by Erik Moller ( Book )
4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 346 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report describes all civil jury verdicts reached from 1985 to 1994 in the state courts of general jurisdiction in 15 jurisdictions across the nation and identifies trends in these verdicts. Several descriptive measures are used, including number of verdicts, number of verdicts within different case types, percentage of cases in which the plaintiff is successful, award amounts (typical, maximum, and expected awards), variation in awards, and the occurrence and size of punitive damage awards. The study finds that trial rates are generally flat or decreasing; case mix has not changed significantly in the past ten years; award amounts are generally increasing; and punitive damage awards are rare, but their amounts increased dramatically between 1985-1989 and 1990-1994. Jury verdicts can provide valuable information about the signals that attorneys and potential claimants receive from the civil justice system, but it is cautioned that they reveal little about the underlying dynamics of jury behavior
Asbestos in the courts : the challenge of mass toxic torts ( Book )
3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 316 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report presents the results of a study of how the civil justice system has dealt with the challenges presented by asbestos litigation. Its sections describe (1) the characteristics of asbestos litigation, both at the individual case level and at the aggregate level; (2) the way in which the court system has approached the three critical tasks of litigation--substantive decisionmaking, preparing cases for trial, and disposing of cases; and (3) the implications of the findings. Based on their observations of the asbestos litigation process, the authors review the strengths and weaknesses of the tort system as a mechanism for resolving mass toxic torts, consider changes that might strengthen the system, and suggest a mechanism for formulating new policies
Court efforts to reduce pretrial delay ; a national inventory by Rand Corporation ( Book )
3 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 299 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This report ... lists and describes techniques employed by the courts to combat pretrial delay in all 50 state court systems, as reported by court administrators at both the state and the metropolitan levels. The Report includes observations by court officials on how much the measures adopted have really changed the prior situation, and what problems, if any, have arisen."--Foreword, p. v
The civil jury--trends in trials and verdicts, Cook County, Illinois, 1960-1979 by Mark A Peterson ( Book )
4 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 286 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report presents the results of an extensive examination of the decisions made by litigants, courts, and juries in a large number of civil jury trials. It is based on detailed data on 9,000 civil cases that were tried before juries in Cook County, Illinois (the nation's second largest county), between 1960 and 1979. The information in the report details more than 9,000 civil suits tried to verdict. These include all civil suits for money damages other than those arising from automobile and common carrier accidents and a one-quarter random sample of automobile and common carrier cases. The report describes trends in the number of civil jury trials, in the proportion of cases in which defendants are found liable and in the size of awards to plaintiffs. These trends are analyzed separately for ten different types of civil cases. The report does not try to explain the trends nor to draw out their implications. This report is the first in a series that will use the data to delve into the underlying causes of the events
Costs of the civil justice system : court expenditures for various types of civil cases by James S Kakalik ( Book )
2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 264 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report analyzes the cost of processing domestic relations, mental health, probate and guardianship, property rights and condemnation, torts contracts and other civil complaints, and other civil petitions cases. Section II details the procedures for estimating and analyzing government expenditures for processing civil cases. Section III describes how the study derived the government expenditure per judge for each of the courts in the study -- a necessary element in the cost-estimation procedure. Section IV reports the estimates of government expenditure and judge-time per civil case filed for various types of civil cases in state and federal courts. Finally, Sec. V provides estimates of the total nationwide government expenditure for processing civil cases
Judicial arbitration in California : the first year by Deborah R Hensler ( Book )
6 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A study of the critical implementation phase of the California judicial arbitration program. The report begins by identifying the primary objectives of the program's supporters. The authors then describe the historical background of the adoption of mandatory arbitration in California, and the evolution of the program's design. The results of the exploratory analysis of the program's effects are then presented. Arbitration's potential for reducing court workload is examined. The costs of operating the program during the first year are analyzed and an approach to estimating the program's potential effect on court costs is presented. A discussion of the effects of arbitration on litigants, focusing on time to disposition, costs of litigation, and equity is given. The final section summarizes the findings and discusses how certain groups are likely to respond to the program in the future. The section concludes with a discussion of the research that will be needed for a comprehensive analysis of the costs and benefits of the judicial arbitration program
Variation in asbestos litigation compensation and expenses by Rand Corporation ( Book )
4 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 254 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report analyzes characteristics of individual claims that explain variation in compensation and expenses. The first section describes the research approach and sketches the tangled context in which spending occurs for asbestos product liability litigation. Section II presents data on the characteristics of closed claims and on the actual compensation paid and expenses incurred by plaintiffs, defendants, and insurers in 1980-1982. Section III focuses on explaining the variation in total compensation. Sections IV, V, and VI, respectively, analyze claim characteristics that help explain why certain claims receive no compensation, identify which claims proceed to trial instead of being closed before trial, and identify which claims result in punitive awards. Sections VII and VIII analyze the variations in defense and plaintiff litigation expenses. Finally, Section IX totals the expenditures and examines the ratio between litigation expense payments and net compensation
Trends in tort litigation : the story behind the statistics ( Book )
3 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 251 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This Special Report from The RAND Corporation's Institute for Civil Justice (ICJ) draws on seven years of ICJ research to consider three issues at the heart of the recent debate on trends in tort litigation: (1) how much litigation there is; (2) whether jury awards are stable or out of control; and (3) how much litigation costs and who gets the money. The research suggests that discrepancies among the statistics on tort litigation can be explained by the fact that there is no longer, if there ever was, a single tort system. Instead, there are at least three types of tort litigation, each with its own class of litigants, attorneys, and legal dynamics. The three types of torts are routine personal injury torts (e.g., auto suits), high-stakes personal injury torts (e.g., product liability, malpractice, and business suits), and mass latent injury cases (e.g., asbestos litigation). Each of these areas is characterized by a different litigation growth rate, jury verdict trend, and cost profile, and treating them together--as is done whenever overall statistics for tort litigation are reported--produces a distorted picture
The frequency and severity of medical malpractice claims by Patricia Munch Danzon ( Book )
5 editions published between 1982 and 1983 in English and held by 249 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The frequency and severity of medical malpractice claims increased dramatically in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In response to the malpractice crisis, many states enacted changes in tort law applicable to medical practitioners. This report presents some empirical evidence on the contribution of various factors to the diversity in the frequency and severity of claims across states and over time. Section II provides an overview of countrywide trends in claims for different lines of liability insurance and differences among states in malpractice litigation. Section III presents a theoretical model of the frequency and severity of medical malpractice claims. Section IV describes the data and methodological issues. Section V reports the empirical analysis of frequency of claims per capita, average severity per claim, and average claim cost per capita. Section VI analyzes the determinants of the post-1975 tort reforms. Section VII summarizes the findings and policy implications
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.77 (from 0.00 for Institute ... to 1.00 for A report o ...)
Alternative Names
I.C.J.
ICJ
ICJ Abkuerzung
International Commission of Jurist
Kokusai Horitsuka Iinkai
Kokusai Hōritsuka Iinkai (Spojené státy americké)
Kokusai Hōritsuka Iinkai (U.S.)
Rand Corporation. Institute for Civil Justice
Rand Corporation (Santa Monica). Institute for Civil Justice
RAND Institute for Civil Justice
RAND Institute for Civil Justice Unveraenderte Form
RAND Institute of Civil Justice
Rand Law, Busines, and Regulation. Institute for Civil Justice
コクサイ ホウリツカ イインカイ
Languages
English (111)
Covers