WorldCat Identities

Hoffer, Thomas

Overview
Works: 29 works in 77 publications in 2 languages and 3,649 library holdings
Genres: Longitudinal studies 
Roles: Author
Classifications: LA222, 373.180973
Publication Timeline
.
Most widely held works by Thomas Hoffer
High school achievement : public, Catholic, and private schools compared by James S Coleman( Book )

11 editions published in 1982 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,180 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public and private high schools : the impact of communities by James S Coleman( Book )

10 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 975 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

High school seniors' instructional experiences in science and mathematics by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 357 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public and private schools by James S Coleman( Book )

10 editions published between 1981 and 1982 in English and held by 243 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This report is one of a set of five that constitutes baseline descriptions and initial analyses of a very rich dataset. The report covers four major areas of interest in the comparison of public and private schools: student composition within the public and private sectors, resources available in these schools, the functioning of these schools, and the outcomes for students in the schools. The data and the analyses presented in this report are from the first (1980) wave of a longitudinal study. The responses are from questionnaires completed by representative samples of approximately 58,000 students in 1,015 public and private secondary schools, as well as their respective school officials. Catholic schools, which constitute about two-thirds of the total private sector, and other private schools are separately compared to public schools in the report. For some analyses, two additional sets of schools are included in the comparison. These are 11 high-performance private schools and a set of 12 high-performance public schools. Findings indicate that important factors in bringing about higher scholastic achievement in private and Catholic schools than in public schools are the greater academic demands and more ordered environment. The overall conclusion is made that the factual premises underlying policies that would facilitate use of private schools are much better supported on the whole than those underlying policies that would constrain their use. (Author/MLF)
Social background differences in high school mathematics and science coursetaking and achievement by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 221 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Public and private schools by James S Coleman( Book )

3 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Doctorate recipients from United States universities : summary report 2000( Book )

7 editions published between 2001 and 2006 in English and held by 24 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Final report on the evaluation of the Growth Model Pilot Project by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The U.S. Department of Education (ed) initiated the Growth Model Pilot Project (gmpp) in November 2005 with the goal of approving up to ten states to incorporate growth models in school adequate yearly progress (ayp) determinations under the "Elementary and Secondary Education Act" ("esea"). After extensive reviews, nine states were fully approved for the initial phase of the pilot project by the 2007-08 school year: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, North Carolina, Ohio, and Tennessee. Based on analyses of data provided by the U.S. Department of Education and by the pilot grantee states, this report describes the progress these states made in implementing the gmpp in the 2007-08 school year. The growth models implemented under the gmpp were all designed to augment rather than replace the standard status model and safe-harbor provisions for determining school ayp. The growth models resulted in more schools making ayp than would have been the case using only status and safe-harbor. The results of this analysis showed that schools serving economically disadvantaged student populations in all pilot states except for Arkansas were more likely than more-advantaged schools to make ayp by growth. The results of this analysis show that use of growth models generally added to the number of schools making ayp but that the numbers were not large in almost all pilot states. This study has also shown that the types of growth models states select for federal accountability purposes are consequential and raise some potentially difficult theoretical questions for policymakers. Appendices include: (1) Comparison of gmpp Growth Models with State Accountability Systems; (2) State gmpp Model Summaries; (3) Supplemental Exhibits; and (4) Derivation of the Generic Projection Model Rule for Identifying On-Track Students. (Contains 79 exhibits and 41 footnotes.) [For the related report, "Interim Report on the Evaluation of the Growth Model Pilot Project", see ed511755.]
Interim report on the evaluation of the Growth Model Pilot Project by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Growth Model Pilot Project (gmpp) was initiated to allow states to experiment with adjustments to the No Child Left Behind Act (nclb) status accountability system in order to improve the validity of ayp determinations by giving schools credit for students who are making significant growth. The pilot allowed states, districts, and schools to count students who were on track to being proficient (but not yet there). Under nclb, such students are not counted as proficient for the purpose of adequate yearly progress (ayp) determinations. The pilot was initiated in November 2005 with the goal of approving up to ten states to incorporate growth models in school ayp determinations under nclb. No longer a pilot, the project was written into regulation in late 2008; now any state may apply to use a growth model meeting certain core principles. Currently 15 states are implementing growth models under this authority: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was any effect, and the kind of effect, of application of the growth models; to provide information about how to strengthen the use of growth under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (esea); and to provide information for states that might consider applying to use a growth model under current regulations. This interim report analyzes the effects of growth models in the first eight states approved under the pilot, for the 2006-07 school year: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Iowa, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Specifically, this study is designed to address three questions: (1) How have states in the pilot implemented growth models? (2) How does each pilot state's growth model affect the number and kinds of schools that make ayp? And (3) What are the implications of the pilot experience for strengthening the use of growth within the context of nclb? This report divides into four chapters. The introductory chapter considers how the gmpp models compare with status models in approaches to evaluating student achievement. Chapters ii and iii consider, for each of eight pilot grantee states in the 2006-07 school year, the impact of the state's gmpp model on its ayp determinations. Chapter iv addresses a number of hypothetical questions about how results might change if the data collected as part of the pilot project were used differently. A final project report is planned to address the same research questions with data collected for the 2007-08 school year for all eight states plus Ohio, as well as additional questions about the impact of technical features of the models which are not addressed in the current report. Among the findings were that growth models enabled additional schools to make ayp, but overall percentage increases were not large; the impact of growth models varied widely across states; and most (but not all) schools that made ayp by status would also have made ayp under the growth model alone. The implications for improving use of growth in accountability systems are that states could report both status- and growth-based ayp determinations for all schools in order to give a more complete picture of schools' true performance, including both current performance and whether they are on-track to proficiency in the near future. Appended are: (1) Comparison of gmpp Growth Models with State Accountability Systems; and (2) State gmpp Model Summaries. (Contains 45 exhibits and 27 footnotes.) [This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Education with the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago
Icing on wind energy systems by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Discusses ice accretion (glaze and rime) on systems designed to harness energy from wind power
Catholic high school effects on achievement growth by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Effects of Instructional Differences among Ability Groups on Student Achievment in Middle-School Science and Mathematics by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper analyzes the effects of ability grouping on middle school math and science achievement, attempting to account for these effects in terms of measurable classroom experiences of students. It is hypothesized that grouping effects operate through classroom instructional differences. Data collected from a national sample of public school students and teachers reveal large effects of group placement on 8th-to-9th grade achievement growth, and substantial track differences appear for several instructional variables. Adding the instructional variables to the achievement models shows that 75 percent of the high-ability group effect on science achievement, but only 17 to 33 percent of the mathematics track effects are accounted for by the instructional variables. The largest instructional effects on mathematics achievement are associated with emphases on problem solving and understanding principles (as opposed to computational mechanics), the pacing of the course, and the use of lectures to present the material. The largest effects on science achievement are found for measures of "inquiry-based" instruction, the use of lectures and small-group projects, and student assessments of the accessibility of the subject matter. (Author)
Educational outcomes in public and private high schools by Thomas Hoffer( )

2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Academic employment of recent science and engineering doctorate holders by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"This issue brief presents academic employment characteristics of the recent science and engineering doctorate holders based on the 1997 Survey of Doctorate Recipients data. Although a sizable majority of the recent S & E doctorate holders started graduate school planning for academic employment, less than half actually accept academic employment in the first years after receiving their doctoral degree. This issue brief examines those holding academic jobs and background characteristics related to academic employment."--NSF web site
Doctorate recipients from United States universities : summary report 1998 by Allen R Sanderson( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This is the thirty-third in a series of reports on research doctorates awarded by colleges and universities in the United States. The data presented in this report are from the annual Survey of Earned Doctorates, a census of research doctoral recipients who earned their degrees between July 1, 1998, and June 30, 1999. This survey, conducted since 1958, is sponsored by six federal agencies: the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Education, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. All survey responses become part of the Doctorate Records File, a virtually complete database on research doctorate recipients from 1920 to 1999. The overall response rate for the 1999 survey was 91.7 percent. The report begins by reviewing overall trends in research doctorates awarded by U.S. universities and continues by discussing trends in the seven broad fields in which research doctorate recipients earn their degrees. Trends in doctorate awards by sex, race/ethnicity, citizenship, parental education, and time to degree are described next, and the report concludes with discussion of the sources of financial support during graduate school and the postgraduation status and plans of doctorate recipients. A special section is devoted to the interstate migration of U.S. doctorate recipients from birth to initial postgraduation location. The report includes numerous figures and tables. Appendices include additional statistics, technical notes, and the survey instrument. (Ev)
Doctorate Recipients from United States Universities: Summary Report,1998. Survey of Earned Doctorates by Allen R Sanderson( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This report presents data about recipients of research doctorates awarded by U.S. universities from July 1, 1997 through June 30, 1998. The information is taken from the 1998 Survey of Earned Doctorates, an annual census of new research doctorate recipients. During 1998, 387 universities in the United States conferred 42,683 doctorates, slightly more (0.3%) than in 1997, marking the 13th straight year of increase in doctorates awarded. U.S. citizens earned 27,532 of the 1998 research doctorates. The largest number of doctorates awarded was in the broad field of life sciences, in which 8,540 Ph.D.s were earned. Women received 17,856 doctorates, or 41.8%, the highest percentage ever for women. U.S. citizen racial minorities earned 14.7% of the doctorates earned by U.S. citizens in 1998, the largest percentage ever. The median time to receiving the doctorate since earning the baccalaureate was 10.4 years in 1998, with median time to degree since first enrollment in any graduate program being 7.3 years. The typical Ph.D. recipient was just under 34 years of age at the time the degree was conferred. Three in five (60.6%) of all doctorate recipients in 1998 reported fellowships or teaching/research assistantships from programs or institutions as their primary source of financial support for graduate education. Only half of the doctorate recipients reported educational indebtedness at the time of graduation. Almost 70% of new doctorate recipients reported definite postgraduate commitments for employment or study. (Contains 15 figures and 47 tables.) (Sld)
High school retention of Hispanic youth by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Final report on the National Survey of Algebra Teachers for the National Math Panel by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Effects of instructional differences among ability groups on student achievement in middle-school science and mathematics by Thomas Hoffer( Book )

1 edition published in 1993 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.36 (from 0.19 for Doctorate ... to 0.98 for Leichpredi ...)

Alternative Names
Hoffer, Thomas B.

Languages
English (65)

German (2)