WorldCat Identities

Lorenz, Edward N.

Overview
Works: 62 works in 191 publications in 7 languages and 2,496 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Thrillers (Motion pictures)  Police films  Action and adventure films  Nonfiction films  Educational films  Filmed lectures  Internet videos  Science films  Software 
Roles: Author, Honoree, Contributor, Author of introduction, Editor, Interviewee, Other
Classifications: Q172.5.C45, 003.7
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Edward N Lorenz
 
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Most widely held works by Edward N Lorenz
The essence of chaos by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

63 editions published between 1993 and 2008 in 5 languages and held by 865 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chaos Surrounds us. Seemingly random events - the flapping of a flag, a storm-driven wave striking the shore, a pinball's path - often appear to have no order, no rational pattern. Explicating the theory of chaos and the consequences of its principal findings - that actual, precise rules may govern such apparently random behavior - has been a major part of the work of Edward N. Lorenz. In The Essence of Chaos, Lorenz presents to the general reader the features of this "new science," with its far-reaching implications for much of modern life, from weather prediction to philosophy, and he describes its considerable impact on emerging scientific fields. Unlike the phenomena dealt with in relativity theory and quantum mechanics, systems that are now described as "chaotic" can be observed without telescopes or microscopes. They range from the simplest happenings, such as the falling of a leaf, to the most complex processes, like the fluctuations of climate. Each process that qualifies, however, has certain quantifiable characteristics: how it unfolds depends very sensitively upon its present state, so that, even though it is not random, it seems to be. Lorenz uses examples from everyday life, and simple calculations, to show how the essential nature of chaotic systems can be understood. In order to expedite this task, he has constructed a mathematical model of a board sliding down a ski slope as his primary illustrative example. With this model as his base, he explains various chaotic phenomena, including some associated concepts such as strange attractors and bifurcations. As a meteorologist, Lorenz initially became interested in the field of chaos because of its implications for weather forecasting. In a chapter ranging through the history of weather prediction and meteorology to a brief picture of our current understanding of climate, he introduces many of the researchers who conceived the experiments and theories, and he describes his own initial encounter with chaos. A further discussion invites readers to make their own chaos. Still others debate the nature of randomness and its relationship to chaotic systems, and describe three related fields of scientific thought: nonlinearity, complexity, and fractality. Appendixes present the first publication of Lorenz's seminal paper, "Does the Flap of a Butterfly's Wing in Brazil Set Off a Tornado in Texas?"; the mathematical equations from which the copious illustrations were derived; and a glossary
The nature and theory of the general circulation of the atmosphere by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

16 editions published between 1967 and 1970 in 3 languages and held by 291 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The atmosphere, a challenge : the science of Jule Gregory Charney by Jule G Charney( Book )

7 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 86 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fractals animated discussion by Heinz-Otto Peitgen( Visual )

14 editions published between 1990 and 2003 in English and Undetermined and held by 54 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The discoverers of the Mandelbrot set and the Lorenz attractor discuss the background, history and details of their work. The film features new computer-graphic illustrations of chaos and self-similarity as well as music composed according to fractal principles
Chaos by Steven H Strogatz( Visual )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 27 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Explores a revolutionary new science that is learning how to analyze, and derive benefit from, a universe of chaos. Through computers and new mathematics and physics, scientists are making surprising sense out of some very chaotic behavior in nature. In fact, many scientists now believe that turbulent processes like weather, waterfalls, and irregular heartbeats have a hidden and highly-ordered structure, a reversal of Newton's long-accepted vision of a clockwork universe unfolding with perfect and always predictable precision
Fraktale in Filmen und Gesprächen( Visual )

3 editions published in 1990 in German and Undetermined and held by 18 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Empirical orthogonal functions and statistical weather prediction by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

4 editions published in 1956 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A "statistical forecasting" formula may be established by determining, from a given sample of data, the linear combination of a set of predictors which forms the best approximation to a given predictand. The dynamical basis for prediction- by such formulas is discussed. Statistical formulas have a greater probability of verifying well, when applied to new data, if the number of predictors is small, relative to the number of independent observations of each predictor. When the desired predictors consist of a continuous field of some physical quantity, the field may be analyzed into a sum of orthogonal functions of space ( Y's ), whose coefficients ( Q's ) are orthogonal functions of time. A small number of Q's with large variances may then be used as predictors. Empirical orthogonal functions ( Y's and Q's ) may also be determined when the data are heterogeneous. The procedure for determining Y's and Q's is routine, and has been programmed for automatic computation. The sea-level pressure field over the United States and southern Canada, as represented by observations at 64 stations, has been analyzed into Y's and Q's . Eight Y's and Q's specify 91 per cent of the variance of the pressure field. In predicting the pressure field from the pressure field on the previous day, nothing appears to be gained by using more than a small number of Q's as predictors or predictands. The possible use of empirical orthogonal functions in nonlinear statistical forecasting, and in dynamic forecasting, is discussed
Les papillons de Lorenz : le paysage non périodique déterminé du printemps : pour orchestre by Tetsuji Emura( )

1 edition published in 1999 and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Physics of climate by José Pinto Peixoto( Book )

4 editions published between 1992 and 1995 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Elegant chaos : algebraically simple chaotic flows by Julien C Sprott( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Includes the historically important systems of van der Pol, Duffing, Ueda, Lorenz, Rössler and many others, this book collects the mathematically simple systems of differential equations whose solutions are chaotic
Prospects for statistical weather forecasting : final report: Statistical Forecasting Project by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

3 editions published in 1959 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Fraktale in Filmen und Gesprächen( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in German and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Jesus : a biography by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Nonlinearity, weather prediction, and climate deduction by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

2 editions published in 1966 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The equations governing the atmosphere are nonlinear. Weather prediction is identified with determining particular solutions of these equations, while climate deduction is identified with determining statistics of the general solution. The nonperiodicity gives rise to small-scale motions and nonperiodicity. The nonperiodicity makes analytic solution of the equations unfeasible. Particular solutions must therefore be determined numerically, and the small-scale motions cannot be properly included. The range at which accurate detailed forecasts can be produced is thus limited. The nonlinearity also prevents the derivation of closed systems of equations with statistics as unknowns. The statistics must therefore be estimated from particular numerical solutions, which are merely samples. Numerical methods are not required when only upper and lower bounds of the statistics are sought. The need for numerical methods when precise valves are desited is illustrated with a simple quadratic difference equation, while the process of establishing upper and lower bounds is illustrated with a simple partial differential equation. (Author)
Computations of the balance of angular momentum and the poleward transport of heat by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

3 editions published in 1951 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The geostrophic transports of angular momentum and sensible heat are investigated theoretically. At a given latitude and a given pressure level, the poleward geostrophic transport of angular momentum is found to be proportional to the square of the horizontal mass exchange across the given latitude, and a suitably defined average departure of the troughs and ridges at the given pressure level from a north-south orientation. The poleward geostrophic transport of heat is found to be proportional to the square of the horizontal mass exchange, and a suitably defined average departure of the troughs and ridges at the given latitude from a vertical orientation. 'he analytic expressions for the geostrophic transports of angular momentum and heat suggest an ideal procedure for computing the transports from observational data. The various terms in the equation expressing the balance of angular momentum are computed from observational data, for the period 1 November 1945 through 28 February 1946, for various regions within the northern hemisphere. From these computations a diagram depicting the angular momentum balance in the northern hemisphere during this period is constructed. The computed northward transport of angular momentum is found to be consistent with the computed torque exerted on the atmosphere by the earth's surface, at most latitudes. A few modifications of the computed surface torque are suggested. Computed values of the northward transport of sensible heat are presented, for the period 1 November 1945 through 28 February 1946, across various latitudes in the northern hemisphere
Studies of atmospheric predictability; final report, Statistical Forecasting Project by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

4 editions published in 1969 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The range at which good forecasts of the weather are possible is limited by the rate at which separate solutions of the governing dynamic equations diverge from one another. Studies aimed at determining this rate have thus far employed a dynamical approach, an empirical approach, or a dynamical-empirical approach. A comparison of these three approach points to a value of about three days as the best estimate of the average doubling time for small differences between solutions. (Author)
Static stability and atmospheric energy by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

2 editions published in 1957 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The process primarily responsible for the release of kinetic energy in the atmosphere, a rising of warmer air and a simultaneous sinking of colder air, also increases static stability. Gross static stability, a weighted integral of static stability, may be defined in such a way that reversible adiabatic processes have equal effects upon kinetic energy and gross static stability. Since there is a net dissipation of kinetic energy by friction, there is a net generation of kinetic energy by adiabatic processes, and hence a net increase of gross static stability by adiabatic processes, and hence a net decrease of gross static stability by non-adiabatic heating and cooling. Current estimates of frictional dissipation are consistent with a net non-adiabatic cooling of about 0.30 C per day near the tropopause. The increase of static stability accompanying the development of a disturbance causes an increase in dynamic stability, which tends to inhibit further growth of the disturbance. Simplified dynamic equations are developed, which properly describe the relations between total potential energy, kinetic energy, available potential energy, and gross static stability. These include three dimensional systems with the equation of balance or the geostrophic equation, and n-layer models. The two-layer model may be the simplest possible system with variable static stability. The simplistic equations appear to be especially suitable for theoretical studies of the general circulation and similar circulations
Nonlinear versus linear objective weather prediction. by Edward N Lorenz( Book )

2 editions published in 1958 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Lorenz system by H. B Stewart( Visual )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

An introduction to some essential ideas of geometric dynamics, and a detailed analysis of a special dynamical system
Preliminary studies of the eddy momentum flux evaluated from observed wind soundings by Victor P Starr( Book )

3 editions published in 1950 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Pilot studies of the eddy transport of angular momentum based on rawin observations over the North American sector of the northern hemisphere are presented. The horizontal eddy transport of angular momentum in the meridional direction evaluated in this manner appears to be in harmony with general frictional requirements except that the transports are rather large. The desirability of much more extensive compilations of data concerning the subject is indicated. The vertical eddy transport of angular momentum is investigated by means of rawin soundings and it is found that a correlation between the zonal and vertical velocity components associated with eddies the size of cyclones is suggested which is in the right sense to account for a downward transport of angular momentum in middle latitudes. A statistical study of the selectivity of rawin observations has been undertaken and it is shown that rawin observations are biased in favor of weak winds at high levels. The effect of gradients in the cross-current eddy motions on the geostrophic balance is illustrated by means of an integrated model. It is suggested that gradients of the Reynolds stress associated with such eddy motions in the atmosphere and in the oceans may lead to sensible average geostrophic departures which appear as a normal inertial effect in eddying currents
 
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The essence of chaos
Alternative Names
Eduardus Norton Lorenz

Edvard Norton Lorenz

Edward Lorenz

Edward Lorenz Amerikaans wiskundige

Edward Lorenz amerikansk matematikar

Edward Lorenz amerikansk matematiker

Edward Lorenz matematyk amerykański

Edward Lorenz mathématicien américain

Edward N. Lorenz US-amerikanischer Meteorologe

Edward Norton Lorenz amerikansk matematiker

Edward Norton Lorenz matematico statunitense

Lorenc, È. N.

Lorenz, E. 1917-2008

Lorenz, E. N.

Lorenz, Ed 1917-2008

Lorenz, Edward.

Lorenz Edward 1917-2008

Lorenz, Edward N.

Lorenz, Edward N. 1917-2008

Lorenz, Edward Norton

Lorenz Edward Norton 1917-2008

Едвард Лоренц

Едуард Нортън Лоренц

Лоренц, Эдвард Нортон

אדוארד לורנץ

ادوارد لورنتس ریاضی‌دان آمریکایی

إدوارد نورتون لورنتز

로렌츠, 에드워드 1917-2008

로렌츠, 에드워드 N. 1917-2008

에드워드 로렌츠

エドワード・ローレンツ

ローレンツ

愛德華·諾頓·勞侖次

洛伦茨, E.N.

Languages
Covers
Physics of climateElegant chaos : algebraically simple chaotic flows