WorldCat Identities

National Affairs, Inc

Overview
Works: 10 works in 36 publications in 1 language and 3,813 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Forecasts  History 
Roles: isb
Classifications: D16.8, 901
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by National Affairs, Inc
Foreign policy by Carnegie Endowment for International Peace( )

in English and held by 2,804 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

ProQuest electronic version of: Foreign policy. Supports browsing, searching, and printing of documents
National interest( )

in English and held by 947 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Articles and book reviews about national and international political science and history."
Foreign policy FP : the magazine of global politics, economics and ideas( )

in English and held by 42 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The end of history and the last man by Francis Fukuyama( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents evidence to suggest that there are two powerful forces at work in human history, "the logic of modern science" and "the struggle for recognition."
100 top gobal thinkers( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Public Interest( )

in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

ProQuest electronic version of: The Public interest. Supports browsing, searching, and printing of documents
Busing: A Review of "the Evidence." by Thomas F Pettigrew( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

David Armor's "The Evidence on Busing" presented a distorted and incomplete review of this politically charged topic. We respect Armor's right to publish his views against "mandatory busing." But we challenge his claim that these views are supported by scientific evidence. A full discussion of our reading of the relevant research would be too lengthy and technical for the non-specialist. We must limit ourselves to outlining and discussing briefly our principal disagreements with Armor, which center on four major points. First, his article begins by establishing unrealistically high standards by which to judge the success of school desegregation. Second, the article presents selected findings from selected studies as "the evidence on busing." The bias is twofold. The few studies mentioned constitute an incomplete list and are selectively negative in results. Only cursory descriptions are provided of the few investigations that are reviewed. Third, the paper's anti-busing conclusions rest primarily on the findings from one short-term study conducted by Armor himself: an evaluation of a voluntary busing program in metropolitan Boston. This study is probably the weakest reported in the paper. Fourth, objections must be raised to the basic assumptions about racial change that undergird the entire article. The whole national context of individual and institutional racism is conveniently ignored. [For David Armor's reply, see ud 013 499.] (Author/JM)
Foreign Policy( Book )

1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The American Congress( Book )

1 edition published in 1990 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The Double Double St andard: A Reply by David J Armor( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Thomas Pettigrew and his associates have missed the essential point of my study. The essential requirement for sound reasoning on this matter is observance of the distinction among the findings of science, the results of policy, and the dictates of law or morality. I studied the results of existing policies of induced school integration (all of which used, out of necessity, varying amounts of busing). I was not studying the scientific issue of what might happen under various conditions (other than those in effect in the programs studied), nor the legal question of whether it should have happened according to various constitutional interpretations. My task was far simpler. I asked only the question: What has happened? My critics have confused the "has" with the "might" and the"should." This confusion is further compounded by their application of two double standards for the evaluation and use of the evidence on busing. I am accused of having too severe standards and unrealistic expectations about the benefits of induced school integration. But I did not formulate these standards and expectations. They come from the programs themselves, buttressed by several noteworthy studies. I would like to see more voluntary busing on a controlled, experimental basis accompanied by a careful research and evaluation effort. This is the only responsible way to resolve the busing controversy and to establish sound guidelines for policy makers. [For the article by Thomas Pettigrew, see ud 013 498.] (Author/JM)
 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.30 (from 0.28 for Foreign po ... to 0.98 for Busing: A ...)

Alternative Names
National affairs, inc.

Languages
English (36)