WorldCat Identities

Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz

Overview
Works: 35 works in 156 publications in 1 language and 12,607 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Records and correspondence  Sources  Exhibition catalogs  Short stories  Fiction  Documentary television programs 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: LA229, 378.1980973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz
 
Most widely held works by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz
Campus life : undergraduate cultures from the end of the eighteenth century to the present by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

21 editions published between 1987 and 2009 in English and held by 1,191 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Every generation of college students, no matter how different from its predecessor, has been an enigma to faculty and administration, to parents, and to society in general. Watching today's students "holding themselves in because they had to get A's not only on tests but on deans' reports and recommendations," Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, author of the highly praised Alma Mater, began to ask, "What has gone wrong'how did we get where we are today'" Campus Life is the result of her search'through college studies, alumni autobiographies, and among students themselves'for an answer. She begins in the post-revolutionary years when the peculiarly American form of college was born, forced in the student-faculty warfare: in 1800, pleasure-seeking Princeton students, angered by disciplinary action, "show pistols ... and rolled barrels filled with stones along the hallways." She looks deeply into the campus through the next two centuries, to show us student society as revealed and reflected in the students' own codes of behavior, in the clubs (social and intellectual), in athletics, in student publications, and in student government. And we begin to notice for the first time, from earliest days till now, younger men, and later young women as well, have entered not a monolithic "student body" but a complex world containing three distinct sub-cultures. We see how from the beginning some undergraduates have resisted the ritualized frivolity and rowdiness of the group she calls "College Men." For the second group, the "Outsiders," college was not so much a matter of secret societies, passionate team spirit and college patriotism as a serious preparation for a profession; and over the decades their ranks were joined by ambitious youths from all over rural America, by the first college women, by immigrants, Jews, "townies," blacks, veterans, and older women beginning or continuing their education. We watch a third subculture of "Rebels"'both men and women ' emerging in the early twentieth century, transforming individual dissent into collective rebellion, contending for control of collegiate politics and press, and eventually'in the 1960s'reordering the whole college/university world. Yet, Horowitz demonstrates, in spite of the tumultuous 1960s, in spite of the vast changes since the nineteenth century, the ways in which undergraduates work and play have continued to be shaped by whichever of the three competing subcultures'college men and women, outsiders, and rebels'is in control. We see today's campus as dominated by the new breed of outsiders (they began to surface in the 1970s) driven to pursue their future careers with a "grim professionalism." And as faint and sporadic signs emerge of (perhaps) a new activism, and a new attraction to learning for its own sake, we find that Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz has given us, in this study, a basis for anticipated the possible nature of the next campus generation
Alma mater : design and experience in the women's colleges from their nineteenth-century beginnings to the 1930s by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

19 editions published between 1984 and 1993 in English and Undetermined and held by 1,133 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The creation and development of 10 women's colleges are discussed: Mount Holyoke, Vassar, Wellesley, Smith, Radcliffe, Bryn Mawr, and Barnard (the Seven Sisters colleges), and Sarah Lawrence, Bennington, and Scripps. Consideration is given to: how each of these colleges offered to women an education equal to that offered by the best men's colleges; how they drew on an understanding of predecessors' successes and failures; how this understanding affected the colleges' initial design; and how the plan for each campus reflected the changes in attitudes, hopes, and fears that accompanied the bold act of offering higher learning to women. While the colleges extended to women the skills and culture previously reserved for men, they did so in a setting designed to keep students virtuous and to protect their femininity. Students, however, broke with the common notions of femininity of their era, and women faculty members threw off the restraints they had known as seminary teachers and began to enjoy autonomy in both their professional and private lives. Responses to changes by the Seven Sisters colleges included raising standards, reorganizing administrations and policies, erecting new buildings, and as a group, developing a common conception of their design and purpose. (Author/SW)
Rereading sex : battles over sexual knowledge and suppression in nineteenth-century America by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

18 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and Undetermined and held by 958 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A study of nineteenth-century opinions toward human sexuality examines the various viewpoints that shaped American attitudes toward the human body, love, intercourse, masturbation, contraception, abortion, free love, and erotica
Wild unrest : Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the making of "The yellow wall-paper" by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

14 editions published between 2010 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 770 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Presents a biography on the late author that focuses on the real events that inspired the famous work, "The Yellow Wall-Paper," along with the author's views on the work's true inspiration and meaning
The power and passion of M. Carey Thomas by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

7 editions published between 1994 and 1999 in English and held by 645 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

We see the Cornell woman - in an age when marriage eliminated the possibility of a serious career - promising her parents to avoid all encounters with men students; the young educator outwitting college trustees to develop her dreams of a rigorous education for women. Throughout, as the book reconstructs Thomas' consciousness and her understanding of herself as a woman of passion, Horowitz provides fresh insights into emotional and sexual life in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
Landscape in sight : looking at America by John Brinckerhoff Jackson( Book )

10 editions published between 1997 and 2000 in English and held by 603 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"During a long and distinguished career, John Brinckerhoff Jackson (1909-1996) brought about a new understanding and appreciation of the American landscape. Jackson founded Landscape Magazine in 1951, taught at Harvard University and the University of California at Berkeley, and wrote nearly two hundred essays and reviews. This appealing anthology of his most important writings on the American landscape, illustrated with his own sketches and photographs, brings together Jackson's most famous essays, significant but less well known writings, and articles that were originally published unsigned or under various pseudonyms. Jackson also completed a new essay for this volume, "Places for Fun and Games," a few months before his death."--Jacket
Culture & the city : cultural philanthropy in Chicago from the 1880's to 1917 by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

14 editions published between 1969 and 1989 in English and held by 548 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Love across the color line : the letters of Alice Hanley to Channing Lewis by Alice Hanley( Book )

4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 418 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This book examines a remarkable collection of twenty-seven letters written by a white working-class woman to her African American lover in 1907 and 1908. Stuffed inside a black lace stocking, the letters were hidden under the floorboards of a house in Northampton, Massachusetts, until their recent discovery. Reflecting the passions and anxieties of the moment, the letters were written by Alice Hanley, the daughter of Irish Catholic immigrants, to Channing Lewis, a cook in Springfield. Since the thoughts and feelings of women like Hanley have usually been filtered through middle-class reformers, her words provide a rare window into a realm of American social life seldom explored by historians. The letters are accompanied by essays that skillfully probe their larger meanings. Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz introduces the letters, placing them in the context of their time, while journalist Phoebe Rolin Mitchell recounts the story of their discovery. Kathy Peiss explores Hanley's life, her negotiation of illicit love, and her desire for respectability, re-creating a dense and textured world of home, church, and town. Historian Louis Wilson unearths the trail left by Lewis and members of his extended family in Springfield. Reviewing the experiences of African Americans in that city, Wilson clarifies the economic, social, and political position of a black, middle-aged breadwinner during the difficult years of the early twentieth century
The flash press : sporting male weeklies in 1840s New York by Patricia Cline Cohen( Book )

14 editions published in 2008 in English and Undetermined and held by 362 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"Obscene, libidinous, loathsome, lascivious. Those were just some of the ways critics described the nineteenth-century weeklies that covered and publicized New York City's extensive sexual underworld. Publications like the Flash and the Whip--distinguished by a captivating brew of lowbrow humor and titillating gossip about prostitutes, theater denizens, and sporting events--were not the sort generally bound in leather for future reference, and despite their popularity with an enthusiastic readership, they quickly receded into almost complete obscurity. Recently, though, two sizable collections of these papers have resurfaced, and in The Flash Press three renowned scholars provide a landmark study of their significance as well as a wide selection of their ribald articles and illustrations. Including short tales of urban life, editorials on prostitution, and moralizing rants against homosexuality, these selections epitomize a distinct form of urban journalism. Here, in addition to providing a thorough overview of this colorful reportage, its editors, and its audience, the authors examine nineteenth-century ideas of sexuality and freedom that mixed Tom Paine's republicanism with elements of the Marquis de Sade's sexual ideology. They also trace the evolution of censorship and obscenity law, showing how a string of legal battles ultimately led to the demise of the flash papers: editors were hauled into court, sentenced to jail for criminal obscenity and libel, and eventually pushed out of business. But not before they forever changed the debate over public sexuality and freedom of expression in America's most important city"--Publisher's description
Attitudes toward sex in antebellum America : a brief history with Documents by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

4 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 262 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The public discussion of sexuality in America first came about in the 1820s. Predictably, Americans diverged considerably on how to approach the controversial topic. Folk wisdom, current scientific beliefs, and the teachings of evangelical Christianity all shaped the antebellum conversation about the moral, social and physical implications of sex. In her introduction, Professor Horowitz takes American sexual history beyond the boundaries of the twentieth century and elucidates the complex issues surrounding nineteenth-century debates and dialogue. Helpful headnotes contextualize this colorful selection of hard-to-find documents, which includes medical articles, religious pamphlets, advertisements and propaganda, and popular literature. Contemporary illustrations, a chronology, and a bibliography foster students understanding of antebellum sexual knowledge
A taste for Provence by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

3 editions published in 2016 in English and held by 68 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

John S. Sargent : portraits in praise of women by Patricia Hills( Book )

1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 22 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Frat boys( Visual )

2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 19 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A feature-length exploration of fraternities from their emergence in the 1820s to today. Follow a legacy through the rush process at Ole Miss's Phi Delta Theta frat. Includes interviews with celebrity "brothers" including Kevin Costner ... Hazing and heritage share the stage in this objective look at one of the enduring customs of American campuses."--Publisher's website
Landscape in sight : J.B. Jackson's America by John Brinckerhoff Jackson( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 16 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Attitudes toward sex in antebellum America a brief history with documents by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Recording )

1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

[This text] is a documentary history that offers a fresh approach to the history of sexuality, presenting a much richer portrait of nineteenth-century sexual understanding and viewpoints than is conventionally available to students and instructors.... This book brings back to light those primary sources written by and for the group for whom society was very much in flux during the antebellum era - white, middle-class Northeasterners whose lives were profoundly changed by the Industrial Revolution. This collection of documents demonstrates that these antebellum men and, in particular, women were actively engaged in commentary and controversy about sex, sexuality, reproduction, and their own bodies and desires. Their words resonate today, as twenty-first-century Aemricans discuss and debate many of the same issues and concerns. -Pref
Campus life : undergraduate cultures from the end to the eighteenth century to the present by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

2 editions published between 1987 and 1988 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Herland and selected stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman( Book )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

At the turn of the twentieth century, Charlotte Perkins Gilman was a celebrity'acclaimed as a leader in the feminist movement and castigated for her divorce, her relinquishment of custody of her daughter, and her unconventional second marriage. She was also widely read, with stories in popular magazines and with dozens of books in print. Her most famous short story, the intensely personal 'The Yellow Wallpaper, ' was read as a horror story when first published in 1892 and then lapsed into obscurity before being rediscovered and reinterpreted by feminist scholars in the 1970s. Noted anthologist Barbara Solomon has put together a remarkable collection of Gilman's fiction, which includes twenty short stories and the complete text of Herland, the landmark utopian novel that remained unavailable for more than sixty years. From 'The Unexpected, ' printed in Kate Field's Washington in 1890, to such later tales as 'Mrs. Elder's Idea, ' published in Gilman's own periodical, The Forerunner, readers can again encounter this witty, original, and audacious woman who dared to challenge the status quo and who created fiction that continues to be fresh and timeless. Edited and with an Introduction by Barbara H. Solomon
The Art Institute of Chicago : a centennial perspective( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

History, science, and gender ; Alma mater ; and, The morality of spending( Recording )

1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Side B. Helen Horowitz discusses her book about women's colleges from their 19th-century beginnings to the 1930s. Daniel Horowitz discusses his book about intellectual responses to consumerism
Love across the color line : the letters of Alice Hanley to Channing Lewis by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz( Book )

2 editions published in 1996 in Undetermined and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Rereading sex : battles over sexual knowledge and suppression in nineteenth-century America
Alternative Names
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz American historians

Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz Amerikaans historica

Lefkowitz Horowitz, Helen

Lefkowitz-Horowitz, Helen 1942-

Languages
English (134)

Covers
Alma mater : design and experience in the women's colleges from their nineteenth-century beginnings to the 1930sRereading sex : battles over sexual knowledge and suppression in nineteenth-century AmericaWild unrest : Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the making of "The yellow wall-paper"The power and passion of M. Carey ThomasLandscape in sight : looking at AmericaLove across the color line : the letters of Alice Hanley to Channing LewisThe flash press : sporting male weeklies in 1840s New YorkAttitudes toward sex in antebellum America : a brief history with DocumentsLandscape in sight : J.B. Jackson's America