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Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center

Overview
Works: 1,047 works in 1,732 publications in 1 language and 65,633 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Handbooks, manuals, etc 
Classifications: TE23, 625
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Publications about Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center Publications about Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
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Most widely held works about Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
 
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Most widely held works by Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
Multiple corrosion protection systems for reinforced concrete bridge components ( )
9 editions published between 2007 and 2011 in English and held by 622 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Eleven systems containing epoxy-coated reinforcement (ECR) in combination with another corrosion-protection system are evaluated using the rapid macrocell, southern exposure, cracked beam, linear polarization resistance, and field tests. The systems include bars pretreated with zinc chromate to improve the adhesion between the epoxy and the reinforcing steel, two epoxies with improved adhesion to the reinforcing steel, one inorganic corrosion inhibitor (calcium nitrite), two organic corrosion inhibitors (Rheocrete 222+ and Hycrete), an epoxy-coated bar with a primer containing microencapsulated calcium nitrite, three epoxy-coated bars with improved adhesion combined with the corrosion inhibitor calcium nitrite, and multiple-coated (MC) bars with an initial 50-microm (2-mil) coating of 98 percent zinc and 2 percent aluminum followed by a conventional epoxy coating. The systems are compared with conventional uncoated reinforcement and conventional ECR. The coatings on all bars are penetrated to simulate the effects of damage during fabrication and placement in the field. The results presented in this report indicate that the coated bars provide superior corrosion protection to the reinforcing steel and that bars with damaged coatings initiate corrosion at chloride contents within concrete that are several times greater and corrode at rates that are typically two orders of magnitude below those exhibited by conventional reinforcement
Office of Safety R & D by United States ( )
8 editions published between 2002 and 2012 in English and held by 529 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Research & technology transporter ( )
in English and held by 395 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Pedestrian and bicyclist intersection safety indices final report by Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center ( )
9 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 341 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Public roads ( )
in English and held by 329 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Keeps the reader up-to-date on developments in federal highway policies, programs, and research and technology. Covers advances and innovations in highway/traffic research and technology, critical national transportation issues, important activities and achievements of FHWA and others in the highway community, specific FHWA program areas, and subjects of interest to highway industry professionals
Corrosion resistant alloys for reinforced concrete by Francisco Presuel-Moreno ( )
5 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 329 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Deterioration of concrete bridges because of reinforcing steel corrosion has been recognized for 4-plus decades as a major technical and economic challenge for the United States. As an option for addressing this problem, renewed interest has focused on corrosion resistant reinforcements, stainless steels in particular. The present research study was performed jointly by Florida Atlantic University and the Florida Department of Transportation to evaluate reinforcements of this type. These included solid stainless steels 3Cr12 (UNS-S41003), 2101LDX (ASTM A955-98), 2304 (UNS-S31803), 2205 (UNS 31803), two 316L (UNS S31603) alloys, two 316 stainless steel clad black bar products, and ASTM A1035 commonly known as MMFX 2. Black bar (ASTM A615) reinforcement provided a baseline for comparison purposes. Results from short-term tests and preliminary results from long-term exposure of reinforced concrete slabs were presented in the first interim report for this project. This second interim report provides longer-term data and analyses of chloride exposures that involved four different types of reinforced concrete specimens, two of which were intended to simulate northern bridge decks exposed to deicing salts and the remaining two to marine substructure elements. Three different concrete mix designs were employed, and specimen types included combinations with a (1) simulated concrete crack, (2) bent top bar, (3) corrosion resistant upper bar(s) and black steel lower bars, and (4) intentional clad defects such that the carbon steel substrate was exposed. Cyclic wet-dry ponding with a sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was employed in the case of specimens intended to simulate northern bridge decks, and continuous partial submergence in either a NaCl solution or at a coastal marine site in Florida was used for specimens intended to represent a coastal bridge substructure. The exposures were for periods in excess of 4 years. The candidate alloys were ranked according to performance, and an analysis is reported that projects performance in actual concrete structures
LTPP computed parameter dynamic modulus ( )
4 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 315 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The objective of this study was to use readily available binder, volumetric, and resilient material properties in the Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) database to develop E* estimates. This report provides a thorough review of existing prediction models. In addition, several models have been developed using artificial neural networks for use in this project. This report includes assessments of each model, quality control checks applied to the data, and the final structure and format of the dynamic modulus data added to the LTPP database. A program was also developed to assist in populating the LTPP database, and the details of the program are provided in this report
Achieving a high level of smoothness in concrete pavements without sacrificing long-term performance by Rohan W Perera ( )
4 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 314 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Safety evaluation of offset improvements for left-turn lanes ( )
4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 290 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) organized a pooled fund study of 26 States to evaluate low-cost safety strategies as part of its strategic highway safety effort. One of the strategies chosen to be evaluated for this study was offset improvements for left-turn lanes. This strategy is intended to reduce the frequency of crashes by providing better visibility for drivers that are turning left. The safety effectiveness of this strategy has not been thoroughly documented, and this study is an attempt to provide an evaluation through scientifically rigorous procedures"--Technical documentation p
Safety effectiveness of the HAWK pedestrian crossing treatment by Kay Fitzpatrick ( )
3 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 283 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The High intensity Activated crossWalK (HAWK) is a pedestrianactivated beacon located on the roadside and on mast arms over major approaches to an intersection. It was created in Tucson, AZ, and at the time of this study, it was used at more than 60 locations throughout the city. The HAWK head consists of two red lenses over a single yellow lens. It displays a red indication to drivers when activated, which creates a gap for pedestrians to use to cross a major roadway. A before after study of the safety performance of the HAWK was conducted. The evaluations used an empirical Bayes (EB) method to compare the crash prediction for the after period if the treatment had not been applied to the observed crash frequency for the after period with the treatment installed. To develop the datasets used in this evaluation, crashes were counted if they occurred within the study period, typically 3 years before the HAWK installation and 3 years after the HAWK installation or up to the limit of the available crash data for the after period. Two crash datasets were created. The first dataset included intersecting street name (ISN) crashes, which were all crashes with the same intersecting street names that matched the intersections used in the study. The second dataset included intersection related (IR) crashes, which were only those ISN crashes that had yes for the intersection related code. The crash types that were examined included total, severe, and pedestrian crashes. From the evaluation that considered data for 21 HAWK sites (treatment sites) and 102 unsignalized intersections (reference group), the following changes in crashes were found after the HAWK was installed: a 29 percent reduction in total crashes (statistically significant), a 15 percent reduction in severe crashes (not statistically significant), and a 69 percent reduction in pedestrian crashes (statistically significant)
Safety evaluation of improved curve delineation by Raghavan Srinivasan ( )
4 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 278 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) organized a pooled fund study of 26 States to evaluate low-cost safety strategies as part of its strategic highway safety effort. One of the strategies chosen to be evaluated for this study was improving curve delineation. Geometric, traffic, and crash data were obtained at 89 treated curves in Connecticut and 139 treated curves in Washington to determine the safety effectiveness of improved curve delineation. Treatments varied by site and included new chevrons, horizontal arrows, and advance warning signs as well as the improvement of existing signs using fluorescent yellow sheeting. All sites were on two lane rural roads. To account for potential selection bias and regression to the mean, an Empirical Bayes (EB) before after analysis was conducted. The aggregate results revealed an 18% reduction in injury and fatal crashes, a 27.5% reduction in crashes during dark conditions, and a 25% reduction in lane departure crashes during dark conditions. The reductions were more prominent at locations with higher traffic volumes and sharper curves (curve radius less than 492 ft) and in locations with more hazardous roadsides (roadside hazard rating (RHR) of 5 or higher) compared to locations with less hazardous roadsides (RHR of 4 or lower). In addition, curves where more signs were either added or replaced (with a more retroreflective material) within the curve experienced larger reductions in crashes. An economic analysis revealed that improving curve delineation with signing improvements is a very cost effective treatment with the benefit cost ratio exceeding 8:1
Office of Infrastructure R & D ( )
5 editions published between 2004 and 2012 in English and held by 269 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This fact sheet provides concise information about the Office of Infrastructure Research and Development
Office of Infrastructure R & D structures by United States ( Book )
3 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 237 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Reliability of visual inspection for highway bridges ( )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 235 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Advanced methods for using FWD deflection-time data to predict pavement performance ( )
2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 230 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Corrosion evaluation of epoxy-coated, metallic-clad, and solid metallic reinforcing bars in concrete by David B McDonald ( Book )
5 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 199 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This report describes the work conducted from 1993 to 1998 to develop cost-effective "new breeds" of organic, inorganic, ceramic and metallic coatings, as well as metallic alloys that can be utilized on or as reinforcement for embedment in portland cement concrete. As part of the study, 12 different bar types were tested in concrete: black bars, 3 bendable and 3 nonbendable epoxies, Type 304 and Type 316 stainless steel, copper-clad, galvanized and spray metallic-clad reinforcing. Measurements of macrocell voltages, half-cell potentials, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, linear polarization and mat-to-mat resistances were used in conjunction with visual observations to determine the effectiveness of each system
Signalized intersections informational guide by United States ( )
4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 190 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This guide provides a single, comprehensive document with methods for evaluating the safety and operations of signalized intersections and tools to remedy deficiencies. The treatments in this guide range from low-cost measures such as improvements to signal timing and signage, to high-cost measures such as intersection reconstruction or grade separation. Topics covered include fundamental principles of user needs, geometric design, and traffic design and operation; safety and operational analysis techniques; and a wide variety of treatments to address existing or projected problems, including individual movements and approaches, pedestrian and bicycle treatments, and corridor techniques. It also covers alternative intersection forms that improve intersection performance through the use of indirect left turns and other treatments. Each treatment includes a discussion of safety, operational performance, multimodal issues, and physical and economic factors that the practitioner should consider. Although the guide focuses primarily on high-volume signalized intersections, many treatments are applicable for lower volume intersections as well. The information contained in this guide is based on the latest research available on treatments and best practices in use by jurisdictions across the United States. Additional resources and references are highlighted for the student, practitioner, researcher, or decisionmaker who wishes to learn more about a particular subject
Shared-use path level of service calculator a user's guide by Robert S Patten ( )
2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 187 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Design and evaluation of jointed plain concrete pavement with fiber reinforced polymer dowels ( )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 182 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This study evaluates fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) dowel bars as load transferring devices in jointed plain concrete pavement (JPCP) under HS25 static and fatigue loads and compares their response with JPCP consisting of steel dowels. Along with laboratory and field evaluations of JPCP with FRP and steel dowels, analytical modeling of dowel response was carried out in terms of maximum bending deflection, relative deflection (RD), and bearing stress of dowels. In addition, field rehabilitation of JPCP was carried out using FRP dowels to evaluate its long-term performance"--Technical report documentation p
 
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Associated Subjects
Arizona--Tucson Behavior modification Bicycle trails Bridges--Inspection Concrete bridges--Corrosion Concrete Pavement Technology Program Corrosion and anti-corrosives--Testing Corrosion resistant materials Curves in engineering Cyclists--Safety measures Dowels--Testing Epoxy coatings--Testing Fiber-reinforced plastics--Testing Highway communications--Research Highway engineering Highway research Intelligent transportation systems--Research Long-Term Pavement Performance Program (U.S.) Metal coating--Testing Pavements, Concrete--Design and construction Pavements, Concrete--Joints--Testing Pavements--Performance Pedestrian areas--Planning Pedestrian crosswalks Pedestrian facilities design Pedestrians--Safety measures Portland cement Reinforced concrete--Corrosion Reinforced concrete--Corrosion--Prevention Reinforcing bars--Testing Roads Roads--Interchanges and intersections--Design and construction Roads--Interchanges and intersections--Evaluation Roads--Interchanges and intersections--Safety measures--Evaluation Roads--Riding qualities Roads--Safety measures Roads--Safety measures--Research Stainless steel Traffic safety Traffic safety--Evaluation Traffic safety--Research Traffic signs and signals Traffic signs and signals--Evaluation Traffic surveys Transportation--Management Transportation--Planning Transportation--Research Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center United States United States.--Federal Highway Administration.--Office of Infrastructure Research and Development
Alternative Names

controlled identity Fairbank Highway Research Station (U.S.)

TFHRC
United States. Federal Highway Administration. Office of Research and Development. Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
United States. Federal Highway Administration. Office of the Associate Administrator for Research and Development (1983- )
United States. Federal Highway Administration. Offices of Research, Development, and Technology. Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
United States. Federal Highway Administration. Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
United States Office of the Associate Administrator for Research and Development (1983- )
United States Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center
Languages
English (134)