WorldCat Identities

University of Iowa Department of English

Overview
Works: 377 works in 399 publications in 1 language and 2,943 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  History  Criticism, interpretation, etc 
Classifications: P1, 410.5
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about University of Iowa Publications about University of Iowa
Publications by University of Iowa Publications by University of Iowa
Most widely held works about University of Iowa
 
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Most widely held works by University of Iowa
Philological quarterly by University of Iowa ( )
in English and held by 1,077 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Walt Whitman quarterly review ( )
in English and held by 682 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Papers in rhetoric and poetic by Donald Cross Bryant ( Book )
3 editions published between 1965 and 1970 in English and held by 312 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Iowa review by University of Iowa ( )
in English and held by 236 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Newsletter on the fourteenth-century English mystics ( )
in English and held by 216 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Iowa journal of literary studies ( )
in English and held by 17 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Mystics quarterly ( )
in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Aids for English teachers by University of Iowa ( )
in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
14th century English mystics newsletter ( )
in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Communities of death Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, and the nineteenth-century American culture of mourning and memorializing by Adam C Bradford ( )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
It illumines how Poe's aesthetic philosophies were aligned with those that undergird many of the contemporary mourning objects of the day, how his otherwise Gothic and macabre literature nevertheless served rather conventional and even recuperative ends by exposing the necessity of and inviting readers to participate in culturally sanctioned acts of mourning, and how he sought to confirm the harmony between his work and more conventional "consolation" or mourning literature by actively seeking to bring that work (and the "self" that produced it) visibly before his readership in a medium that this culture held was a reliable indicator of the nature and intent of both that work and its producer - namely his own personal script. In its latter three chapters, this dissertation illuminates Whitman's own extensive use of mourning and memorial conventions in his work, disclosing the way his 1855 Leaves of Grass relied, in both its literary and physical construction, upon the conventions of mourning and memorial literature, detailing the way his 1865 book of Civil War poetry Drum-Taps sought to unite a national body politic by creating a poetic and material text capable of allowing a grieving public readership to reconnect with and successfully mourn their dead, and how his 1876 Two Rivulets, overtly conceived of as a memorial volume, made use of the conventions associated with mourning and memorializing to bring readers to a more democratic understanding of "self" that Whitman believed would transform America into the democratic utopia it was destined to become. In revealing the way in which these authors' works reflect and reflect upon this culture, its ideologies, rituals, and practices, the dissertation also illumines an otherwise critically underexplored connection between these two writers. It details the influence of Poe's work on Whitman's poetic project, and borrows from Whitman's critical response to Poe in order to recast our understanding of Poe's literature in the manner detailed above. Thus, this dissertation offers new interpretations of some of the period's most canonical literature, alters our thinking about the relationship of these authors to each other and to nineteenth-century sentimental culture, and, finally, exposes a curious interdependence between Gothic and more transcendental literature that has implications not only for reading the work of Whitman and Poe, but for interpreting these literatures more generally
The Iowa review ( Book )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Degree of doctor of philosophy by University of Iowa ( Book )
1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The classical Biblical epic in England by Thomas Farrell ( Book )
2 editions published in 1950 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Encounters with dead white men and other excursions by Laura Elizabeth Crossett ( )
2 editions published between 2003 and 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
to Chaim Potok by University of Iowa ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Invitation for Potok to teach for the writer's workshop program
History of stage management : the role of the prompter in American theatre, 1750-1850 by Jennifer Leigh Sears ( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
A perfect bed by Susannah Cybele Shive ( Book )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Graduate studies in English : M.A. in literary studies, M.F.A. in nonfiction writing, Ph. D., at the University of Iowa : information for prospective graduate students by University of Iowa ( Book )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Assisted migrations : on the salvation and danger in moving the world's species by Clinton Crockett Peters ( )
1 edition published in 2013 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Assisted migration is a term for when people take species and move them out of their historic ranges because they are threatened by climate change. No minor hobby, invasiveness is a a risk that keeps many scientists up at night. Just ask any ecologist from the South. Kudzu vine covers some 120,000 new acres annually, its control thought "non financially feasible anymore" by the USDA. In the Chicago Shipping Channel, Asian silver carp, also known as "jumping fish" for their habits of leaping into the faces of boaters, threaten to swim into the Great Lakes, decimating $7 billion of fishing industries. The list of invasive species is extensive, but the consequences of not moving species are equally severe. Up to fifty-two percent of all life is slated for extinction as soon as 2100 because of climate change. And if global warming is overhauling the planet anyway, it makes little sense to draw fences around wildlands anymore and expect them to stay just as they were. Although my book is aimed in part at nature/science readers and will be well-researched, my prose ultimately uses a whimsical, probing stance that wider audiences will find appealing. Particularly the jargon-free tales of Florida panthers, rabbits in Australia, Texas snow monkeys, kudzu, Iowan prairies and the ancient, rare and dying (memorably named) stinking cedar, and the people who are assisting their migrations, should prove entertaining and instructive to readers who are interested in questioning what it means to be human in the 21st century. The guiding questions for this book are how can we tweak what we barely understand (ecosystems and nature) but then how can we not given the calamities that we face? And, perhaps more philosophically, what does it mean to be a human, a member of the living, in the age of human-induced climate change? These are two paradoxes that I hope to spend 60,000 words sorting out
Affective communities : masculinity and the discourse of emotion in Middle English literature by Travis William Johnson ( )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Erkenwald, Chaucer's Reeve's Tale, and Lydgate's Bycorne and Chychevache--that illuminate particular emotions (anger, compassion, grief, and sorrow) and their significance to codes of masculinity. I argue that these four texts radically revised the forms and meanings of masculine emotional identity and community. This dissertation demonstrates that Middle English poets recognized the transformative potential inherent in the lexicon of emotion and used it to reshape their audiences' understanding of critical cultural problems. The years from the 1350s to the 1450s were important not only in the emerging tradition of poetry in English, but also for the development of the language and psychology of emotion. As poets tried to come to terms with great social changes, they molded and manipulated the discourse of emotion to interrogate what it meant to be a man in late medieval England. Affective Communities reveals the importance of emotions as markers of gender and community and shows literature's role in responding to and imagining social change
 
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Audience level: 0.63 (from 0.47 for Mystics qu ... to 1.00 for Aids for E ...)
Alternative Names

controlled identity University of Iowa

Iowa. University. Dept. of English
University of Iowa. Dept. of English
University of Iowa. English Department
University of Iowa. English Dept
Languages
English (58)