WorldCat Identities

Ruskin, John James

Overview
Works: 181 works in 196 publications in 1 language and 1,810 library holdings
Genres: Records and correspondence  History 
Roles: Author
Classifications: PR5263, 828.809
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about John James Ruskin
 
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Most widely held works by John James Ruskin
The Ruskin family letters: the correspondence of John James Ruskin, his wife, and their son, John, 1801-1843 by John James Ruskin( Book )

5 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 708 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Letters from the Continent, 1858 by John Ruskin( Book )

4 editions published in 1982 in English and held by 428 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Ruskin's letters from Venice, 1851-1852 by John Ruskin( Book )

2 editions published in 1955 in English and held by 361 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Ruskin family letters : the correspondence of John James Ruskin, his wife, and their son, John, 1801-1843 by John James Ruskin( Book )

3 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Ruskin family letters : the correspondence of John James Ruskin, his wife, and their son, John, 1801-1843 by John James Ruskin( Book )

3 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1801-1837 by John James Ruskin( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

1837-1843 by John James Ruskin( Book )

1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Norwood, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Thanking Mr. Harrison for the picture of his "return to pleasing scenery," and especially for his account of the vicarage. There is much "talk of the decline of the Church of England in the regard to respect of the People. I believe on the contrary that it never stood higher in the esteem of the People. I am a thorough believer in the stability and everlasting endurance of the Church of England ..." A vicarage such as the one Mr. Harrison describes is "one of its elements of strength" and most delightful features. "In many a remote corner of our land is to be found a highly educated gentleman with Heart & Head equally good devoting the powers of his mind to the instruction of gentle & simple [people] and displaying the qualities of his Heart in gaining the affections of the rudest congregations, pointing the way to Heaven, aiding them in their wordly pursuits by improving their daily conduct ... [etc.] I honour the Established Church & have no fear of either Carlyle or the seven Essayists doing it much Harm ..." Has he seen Ruskin's article in Fraser's? [Munera Pulveris, Ch. I] He was "not troubled with the M.S. because Froude the Historian who is I suppose Head Editor or half Editor of Fraser kept it quiet & to themselves ..." There are blunders which would have been corrected had Mr. Harrison seen the M.S. "I took no interest in it not liking my son to soften his brain over political economy--Carlyle says this month's Fraser article is the greatest thing my son has yet done--it is to me as incomprehensible as Mr. Browning's admired Poems very Utopian & not the least amusing." He has asked Smith, Elder to send Mr. Harrison the September Christian Observer, "containing one of the kindest critiques on my son's works I have ever met with ..." It also alludes to his "influence ... on the advance of Architecture ... whilst Builders & Architects never name him as having anything to do with their doings." As Mr. Harrison says, "America ... has punished herself--With all their tremendous Boasting & all their Washington wisdom they have in 50 years made for themselves worse than no character at all. They would have been a greater people at this day had they never thrown off their allegiance but been as Australia or Canada are, branches of the British Empire." His son is living in what was once the "Empress of Russia's cottage on the Saleve six miles from Geneva at £8 a month nice garden & superb Views." In a nearby house he has "Room ... for his huge stones and huge books ..." He "writes in greater contentment than for a longtime past."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Denmark Hill, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Further discussing the preparation of the selections [Lady Wortley made a merely summary note to this effect], and inviting him to wine or coffee with Mr. Williams, for Thursday at 8
Autograph letter signed : [n.p.], to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1860 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Offering congratulations on the Directors' having acknowledged Mr. Harrison's merits and deserts. Although he is still suffering from a miserable malady which unfits him for the dinner table, he hopes that Mr. Harrison will join them next Wednesday with the Tweddales. "Unto this Last"--Signed J.R. "to relieve Thackeray from backing such Utopian notions"--will appear in the august Cornhill. John gave his father "the option of using it or not," thinking he would not approve, but "I am delighted with it."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Denmark Hill, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Thanking him for "table of contents of the Volume of Extracts." It "literally speaks Volumes for the Book & the Selectors. It reads wonderfully attractive & exciting & will tell & sell I'm certain very well-- ... I cannot understand how you & Mr. Williams have put [illegible] into 320 pages of print readable it is presumed under Railway Motion."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Denmark Hill, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Noting that Ruskin is nearly well but has not yet left his room. Can Mr. Harrison join a few friends at dinner on Friday? Please say nothing about it to "Mr. Fs" because he and Mrs. R. "are unable for all my customers."
11 Waterloo Place [London], to John James Ruskin by James Hogg( )

1 edition published in 1832 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Thanking him very warmly for his "too liberal subscription" to The Queen's Wake
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Norwood, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Wondering if Mr. Harrison could join them on September 2 with John and Mary Tweddale, the Susan Tweddale (now Mrs. Paterson) and her husband. He and Mrs. Ruskin are "such confirmed invalids" they can have only a few relatives "with your good self."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : [n.p.], to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1859 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Sending best thanks to Mr. Harrison and Mrs. Todd for their efforts, whether they fail or succeed: "The man & woman we were interested in were the most faithful servants of the late Miss Mitford ... [who left] them most of the little all she possessed." John would summon the man [Samuel Sweetman] to meet Mr. Harrison at any place he named. They are about to set forth on "Continental Travels," but this will not hinder Mr. Harrison's "being satiated with revises." The "little forthcoming column [The Two Paths, issued 10 May 1859?] is unimportant & ... [Smith & Elder] like to do all themselves." But when Modern Painters V reaches Spottiwoode's, "you will have revises enough proof on proof." [P.S.], "an answer will oblige written in the dark with much feeling."
Autograph letter signed : [London], to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1853 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saying that because Mr. Harrison sent the enclosed sheets before he had quite finished with them, John James Ruskin would now be "infinitely obliged" if he would glance quickly "over the yet unregarded pages" and send all on to Mr. Rowan as soon as possible. Can Mr. Harrison dine with them on Mrs. Ruskin's birthday, 2 September. "She will admit no visitors but you and Dr. Grant."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Denmark Hill, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saying that yesterday when Mr. Harrison asked whether he was drinking Mr. Ruskin's oldest port, and was told he was not, "I was a little afraid ... you did not feel yourself sufficiently honoured--now the wine you had, 9 years in the bottle, is the finest of the two though the other is 32 years old--" The incident led him to think of how his talk, yesterday, might have created "erroneous impressions ... of luxury indulged in at Denmark Hill having sherry at £300 & £600 a Butt & what affronts. I might unwittingly give by not producing them always to my friends"--The fact is this: "none of these very old & costly wines would be in my house, were they not a part of the apparatus of my business--I daresay you & Mr. Runciman carried away the notion that I bought the Octave of £300 sherry for my own & my friends drinking. Not so--" These pints of precious wine are used "when any of our Country correspondents come to town & are curious to know what such costly sherry can taste like. --offer to send a pint to their Hotel & so though I have paid my Xeres House for it, nearly the whole goes from me in presents to my customers--" The bottle from which Mr. Harrison drank his half glass "has stood within my reach these six months untouched--I give it in thimblefuls being strong as brandy & besides I can no more let bottles of it be emptied at my Table than I can let sample bottles be emptied at Billiter Street--The sherry you had at will yesterday was the Queen's sherry & 1848 claret at 10/6 a bottle. Mr Domecq has driven Champagne off my Table not allowing it to be a wine at all to Mrs. Ruskin's satisfaction as she thinks it an improper wine for the private Table of the middle classes. I am my dear Sir ... "' [P.S.] I almost wish you would let this letter go on to C. Runciman Esqr ... [his address]
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Denmark Hill, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Saying he will never again have 12 people at table; more than 8 cannot be comfortable. He is grateful for the "many kind words beautifully said of both son & Mother." He is glad Mr. Harrison has by his side such "a glorious specimen of my Countrymen in their best aspects" as Mr. Todd: "I used to think in the first years of our Intimacy that your estimate of the Scotch character was by no means flattering & of course was very far from being correct." He will try to get Mr. Harrison & Mr. Todd together, some day, for a dinner of 8," & no more."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Norwood, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1962 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reporting that he continues sadly invalided. The Domecqs are at Denmark Hill, where he dines twice a week, and they are content ... The Richmonds have been with them for several Sunday dinners. They would be happy to see Mr. Harrison next Sunday, "Please God we are able." He expects his son on September 2 [Margaret Ruskin's birthday] but only for a fortnight. Mrs. Ruskin's ability to walk has not improved, and he fears will not--"but her health thank God is pretty good."
Typed copy of a portion of an autograph letter : Denmark Hill, to W.H. Harrison by John James Ruskin( )

1 edition published in 1861 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Asking if he can dine at Denmark Hill to advise Mr. Smith Williams about a volume of extracts from Modern Painters. He did not ask for tickets for John's Royal Institution Lecture either for himself or Mr. Harrison. "John had changed his subject & bungled all & his man [Crawley] found his lecture as different from his ... Bradford & other lectures that he lost his night's sleep on it from vexation. My son in the contrary had one of the pleasantest dreams he ever had in his life--after it so is not hurt--but I am very sorry that drawing one of the largest audiences ever seen at R. Instn. he should have taken as little trouble to do well--" [this may be a reference to the lecture at which Effie & Lady Eastlake sat in the front row laughing until he broke down]
 
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Alternative Names
John James Ruskin

Languages
English (42)

Covers
The Ruskin family letters : the correspondence of John James Ruskin, his wife, and their son, John, 1801-1843The Ruskin family letters : the correspondence of John James Ruskin, his wife, and their son, John, 1801-1843