WorldCat Identities

Knuttgen, Howard G.

Overview
Works: 28 works in 69 publications in 3 languages and 1,667 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other, Author of introduction
Classifications: QP301, 612.044
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Howard G Knuttgen
Biochemistry of exercise by International Symposium on Biochemistry of Exercise( Book )

15 editions published in 1983 in English and Undetermined and held by 581 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The Olympic book of sports medicine by A Dirix( Book )

17 editions published between 1988 and 1991 in English and Undetermined and held by 551 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Neuromuscular mechanisms for therapeutic and conditioning exercise by Howard G Knuttgen( Book )

4 editions published between 1976 and 1977 in English and held by 390 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Physiology and nutrition for competive sport( Book )

4 editions published between 1994 and 2001 in English and held by 112 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Libro olímpico de la medicina deportiva by Howard G Knuttgen( Book )

5 editions published between 1988 and 1990 in Spanish and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Perspectives in exercise science and sports medicine( Book )

1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Kenkōna karadazukuri( Book )

2 editions published in 1982 in Japanese and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Responses to Short Duration High Intensity Cycle Exercise( Book )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Beta-endorphin (B-EP), adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol plasma concentrations were examined before and after maximal exercise at four intensities (36, 55, 73 and 100% of maximal leg power (MLP) utilizing a computerized cycle ergometer. All intensities were greater than those eliciting peak oxygen uptake for the individual subjects. Blood samples were collected at rest, immediately following exercise (IP) and at 5 and 15 min post-exercise. Significant (p <0.05) increases were observed at 36% MLP for B-EP and ACTH at IP, 5 and 15 min post-exercise. Plasma cortisol increased at 36% MLP at 15 min post exercise. Blood lactate significantly increased at all post-exercise collection points for exercise intensities of 36, 55 and 73% MLP and at 5 min post exercise for 100% MLP. B-EP concentrations at 36% MLP were significantly correlated (r=0.75) with capillary density (mm-2) and cortisol concentrations at 36% MLP were significantly correlated (r=0.89) with % type II muscle fibers. No other significant relationships were observed. Keywords: Beta endorphin, Adrenocorticotrophin, Cortisol, Blood lactate, Skeletal muscle fiber morphology, Anaerobic exercise
Biochemistry of exercise( Book )

1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Biochemistry of exercise( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in sports medicine by M Osteaux( Book )

1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Throughout the twentieth century, interest in sport has evidenced a major increase worldwide and a new field of sports medicine has emerged. Sport spectators hip has been stimulated in part by the increased ease of international travel and the intro duction of new means of communication. Interest in professional sports and in such events as the World Cup and the Olympic Garnes has never been higher and the general popularity of sports has drawn increasingly greater numbers of young people to sports participation. Interest in sports participation has been strength ened both by the provision of numerous sports facilities to populations throughout the world and the accumulating information base that relates regular participation in programs of sport and exercise to health enhancement. Along with in creases in interest and participation has corne a need for a better understanding of the physiological changes accompanying muscular activity and of the trauma that can result from both competitive sport and recreational exercise
Biochemistry of exercise( Book )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Automated Data Collection and Processing for a Concentric/Eccentric Cycle Ergometer( Book )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A system for collection and processing of data from a concentric/eccentric high intensity cycle ergometer is described. Each cycle pedal is fitted with transducers to measure pedal angle relative to the crank and foot forces both perpendicular and parallel to the pedal surface. An additional transducer monitors crank position. Output signals are conditioned, amplified, digitized by a 12 bit A/D converter, fed into a computer at 100 Hz per channel, and mathematically smoothed to attenuate noise. For each sample interval, foot force components perpendicular and parallel to the crank arm are calculated. Power generated by subjects on each crank revolution is determined from transducer information. Computer graphics display pedalling parameters vs. crank angle in both rectangular and circular format. Data files containing variables descriptive of pedalling parameter curves are produced to enable computerized statistical analysis of cycling performance. (Author)
The Effects of High Intensity Cycle Exercise on Sympatho-Adrenal- Medullary Response Patterns( Book )

1 edition published in 1989 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Plasma proenkephalin Peptide F immunoreactivity (ir) and catecholamines were examined before and after maximal exercise to exhaustion at four intensities 36, 55, 73 and 100% maximal leg power (MLP) by means of a high resistance cycle ergometer. All intensities were greater than those eliciting peak O2 uptake for the individual subjects. Blood samples were obtained immediately after exercise and at 5 and 15 main post-exercise. Data suggest that exercise-induced increases may be the result of non-colinear storage and release mechanisms in the adrenal medulla. Keywords: Proenkephalins; Opioid peptides; Epinephrine; Norepinephrine; Anaerobic exercise; Skeletal muscle morphology. (EMK)
El metabolismo energético en las pruebas deportivas by Howard G Knuttgen( )

1 edition published in 2000 in Spanish and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Exercise Endurance Time as a Function of Percent Maximal Power Production( )

1 edition published in 1986 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

To develop and statistically validate a mathematical model of the relationship between endurance time (T) and power production, 15 male subjects were first tested for maximal power on an instrumented cycle ergometer at 60 RPM. On subsequent days they were tested for T at various percentages of maximal power. Curves of T as a function of percent maximal power were curvilinear, and could be made to overlap among subjects by individual abscissa scaling, which resulted in the appearance of horizontal stretching or compression of the curves. The degree of stretching-compression was defined by a statistically obtained scaling factor (F) which served to quantify each subject's endurance ability at fractions of maximal power. F was used to transform percent of maximal power to a scaled power variable (P sub sc). A curve of the form T = a times (P sub sc) to the bth power was developed on 10 of the subjects and validated on the remaining five. Correlation between predicted and actual T was 0.976 for the fitting group and 0.980 for the validation group. A maximal power test and a single endurance test at 40-50% of maximal power were found to establish individual endurance-power curves fairly well, with a correlation of 0.828 between actual and predicted T. The combination of F and maximal power for a given physical activity provide a useful profile of an individual's ability to perform at constant exercise intensity
Factors in Maximal Power Production and in Exercise Endurance Relative to Maximal Power( )

1 edition published in 1988 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

The relationship of muscle fiber type and mass to maximal power production and the maintenance of power (endurance time to exhaustion) at 36, 55, and 73% of maximal power was investigated in 18 untrained but physically active male subjects. Power output was determined at constant velocity (60 RPM) on a high intensity cycle ergometer instrumented with force transducers and interfaced with a computer. Fat free mass was determined by hydro-static weighing, fat free thigh volume by water displacement and skinfold measurement, and percentage and area of type II fibers from biopsies of the vastus lateralis. Maximal power averaged 771 + or - 149 W with a range of 527-1125 W. No significant correlations were found among percentage of type II fibers, relative area of type II fibers, or fat free thigh volume and maximal power or endurance times to exhaustion at any percentage of maximal power. Weak but significant relationships were found for fat free mass with both maximal power (r=0.57) and endurance time at 73% of maximal power (r=0.47). These results show maximal power to be more dependent on factors related to body size than muscle fibers characteristics. Keywords: Anaerobic exercise, Skeletal muscle fiber morphology, Fat free thigh volume, Cycle ergometry strength physiology, Physical fitness
 
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Biochemistry of exercise
Alternative Names
Knuttgen, H. G.

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