WorldCat Identities

Bledsoe, Albert Taylor 1809-1877

Overview
Works: 87 works in 293 publications in 1 language and 4,806 library holdings
Genres: History  Fiction  Controversial literature  Sources  Trials, litigation, etc 
Roles: Editor
Classifications: E459, 326
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Albert Taylor Bledsoe Publications about Albert Taylor Bledsoe
Publications by  Albert Taylor Bledsoe Publications by Albert Taylor Bledsoe
posthumous Publications by Albert Taylor Bledsoe, published posthumously.
Most widely held works about Albert Taylor Bledsoe
 
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Most widely held works by Albert Taylor Bledsoe
An essay on liberty and slavery by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
47 editions published between 1856 and 2014 in English and held by 1,064 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"In replying to the others, we are conscious that we have often used strong language; for which, however, we have no apology to offer. We have dealt with their arguments and positions rather than with their motives and characters. If, in pursuing this course, we have often spoken strongly, we merely beg the reader to consider whether we have not also spoken justly. We have certainly not spoken without provocation. For even these men--the very lights and ornaments of abolitionism--have seldom condescended to argue the great question of Liberty and Slavery with us as with equals. On the contrary, they habitually address us as if nothing but a purblind ignorance of the very first elements of moral science could shield our minds against the force of their irresistible arguments. In the overflowing exuberance of their philanthropy, they take pity of our most lamentable moral darkness, and graciously condescend to teach us the very A B C of ethical philosophy! Hence, if we have deemed it a duty to lay bare their pompous inanities, showing them to be no oracles, and to strip their pitiful sophisms of the guise of a profound philosophy, we trust that no impartial reader will take offence at such vindication of the South against her accusers and despisers"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
Cotton is king, and pro-slavery arguments: comprising the writings of Hammond, Harper, Christy, Stringfellow, Hodge, Bledsoe, and Cartwright, on this important subject by E. N Elliott ( Book )
21 editions published between 1860 and 2011 in English and held by 724 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Is Davis a traitor, or, Was secession a constitutional right previous to the war of 1861? by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
22 editions published between 1866 and 1997 in English and held by 689 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"The sole object of this work is to discuss the right of secession with reference to the past; in order to vindicate the character of the South for loyalty, and to wipe off the charges of treason and rebellion from the names and memories of Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, Albert Sydney Johnston, Robert E. Lee, and of all who have fought or suffered in the great war of coercion. Admitting, then, that the right of secession no longer exists; the present work aims to show, that, however those illustrious heroes may have been aspersed by the ignorance, the prejudices, and the passions of the hour, they were, nevertheless, perfectly loyal to truth, justice, and the Constitution of 1787 as it came from the hands of the fathers"--Pref
A theodicy; or, Vindication of the divine glory, as manifested in the constitution and government of the moral world by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
45 editions published between 1853 and 2010 in English and held by 600 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"How, under the government of an infinitely perfect Being, evil could have proceeded from a creature of his own, has ever been regarded as the great difficulty pertaining to the intellectual system of the universe. It has never ceased to puzzle and perplex the human mind. Indeed, so great and so obstinate has it seemed, that it is usually supposed to lie beyond the reach of the human faculties. The supposed want of success attending the labours of the past, is, no doubt, the principal reason which has induced so many to abandon the problem of evil in despair, and even to accuse of presumption every speculation designed to shed light upon so great a mystery. But this reason, however specious and imposing at first view, will lose much of its apparent force upon a closer examination. The assertion is frequently made, that the moral government of the world is purposely left in obscurity and apparent confusion, in order to teach man a lesson of humility and submission, by showing him how weak and narrow is the human mind. We have not, however, been able to find any sufficient reason or foundation for such an opinion. The truth is, that the more clearly the majesty and glory of the divine perfections are displayed in the constitution and government of the world, the more clearly shall we see the greatness of God and the littleness of man. Everything truly great must transcend the powers of the human mind; and hence, if nothing were mysterious, there would be nothing worthy of our veneration and worship. It is mystery, indeed, which lends such unspeakable grandeur and variety to the scenery of the moral world. The construction of a theodicy is not an attempt to solve mysteries, but to dissipate absurdities" (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
The Southern review ( )
in English and held by 383 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
An examination of President Edwards' inquiry into the freedom of the will by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
16 editions published between 1845 and 2011 in English and held by 365 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"In 1754, Johnathan Edwards, who became President of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton), published Freedom of the Will, in which he described his philosophy of moral necessity and the will. According to President Edwards, "by determining the will, if the phrase be used with any meaning, must be intended, causing that the act of the will should be thus, and not otherwise: and the will is said to be determined, when, in consequence of some action, or influence, its choice is directed to, and fixed upon a particular object. As when we speak of the determination of motion, we mean causing the motion of the body to be in such a direction, rather than another." In the present book, Albert Bledsoe refutes Edwards' philosophy by re-examining Edwards' definitions for such concepts as cause, volition, effect, liberty and necessity. Bledsoe concludes that Edwards' theory of freedom of the will contains circular reasoning and is invalid"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
The philosophy of mathematics, with special reference to the elements of geometry and the infinitesimal method by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
18 editions published between 1868 and 2000 in English and held by 194 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Cotton is king, and pro-slavery arguments by E. N Elliott ( Book )
6 editions published between 1860 and 1969 in English and held by 140 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The war between the states; or, Was secession a constitutional right previous to the war of 1861-65? by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
3 editions published in 1915 in English and held by 128 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Roebuck a novel by Charles Wells Russell ( )
3 editions published in 1868 in English and held by 106 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Man and woman, or, The law of honor applied to the solution of the problem, why are so many more women than men Christians? by Philip Slaughter ( Book )
1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 47 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Is secession treason? by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"This is a new, unabridged edition of Is Davis a traitor; or, Was secession a constitutional right previous to the war of 1861? By Albert Taylor Bledsoe, 1809-1877, originally published by the author in 1866" -- Library of Congress
A brief sketch of the rise and progress of astronomy : three lectures by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
3 editions published in 1854 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A theodicy by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( )
4 editions published between 1854 and 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Is Davis a traitor? by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
3 editions published between 1866 and 2014 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Three lectures on rational mechanics, or, the theory of motion by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
1 edition published in 1854 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The mission of woman, a discussion by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
3 editions published in 1913 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The reviewer reviewed. Reply of Hon. Alexander H. Stephens to the Baltimore Leader's notice of the "Review" of the "War between the states, etc." by Alexander H Stephens ( Book )
1 edition published in 1868 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A Theodicy; or, Vindication of the divine glory as manifested in the constitution and government of the moral world ... Sixth edition by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
4 editions published between 1856 and 1864 in Undetermined and English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Cummins movement by Albert Taylor Bledsoe ( Book )
1 edition published in 1874 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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Audience Level
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Audience Level
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Audience level: 0.73 (from 0.00 for A Theodicy ... to 1.00 for Albert Tay ...)
Alternative Names
Bledsoe, A. T.
Bledsoe, Albert
Bledsoe, Albert, 1809-1877
Bledsoe, Albert T.
Taylor Bledsoe, Albert
Taylor Bledsoe, Albert 1809-1877
Languages
English (239)
Covers