WorldCat Identities

Swanstrom, Todd

Overview
Works: 42 works in 138 publications in 1 language and 3,914 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  Bibliography  Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor
Classifications: HV4045, 307.760973
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Todd Swanstrom
Place matters : metropolitics for the twenty-first century by Peter Dreier( Book )
11 editions published between 2001 and 2004 in English and held by 903 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Thoroughly revised and updated for its third edition, Place Matters examines the major trends and problems shaping our cities and suburbs, explores a range of policy solutions to address them, and looks closely at the potential political coalitions needed to put the country's "urban crisis" back on the public agenda"--
Justice and the American metropolis ( )
6 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 535 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Today's American cities and suburbs are the sites of 'thick injustice'--Unjust power relations that are deeply and densely concentrated as well as opaque and seemingly intractable. Thick injustice is hard to see, to assign responsibility for, and to change. Identifying these often invisible and intransigent problems, this volume addresses foundational questions about what justice requires in the contemporary metropolis. Essays focus on inequality within and among cities and suburbs; articulate principles for planning, redevelopment, and urban political leadership; and analyze the connection between metropolitan justice and institutional design. In a world that is progressively more urbanized, and yet no clearer on issues of fairness and equality, this book points the way to a metropolis in which social justice figures prominently in any definition of success"--Provided by publisher
City politics : private power and public policy by Dennis R Judd( Book )
13 editions published between 1994 and 2004 in English and held by 516 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The crisis of growth politics : Cleveland, Kucinich, and the challenge of urban populism by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
4 editions published between 1985 and 1988 in English and held by 451 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Beyond the city limits : urban policy and economic restructuring in comparative perspective by John Logan( Book )
8 editions published between 1990 and 1991 in English and held by 446 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Challenging the notion that there is a single, global process of economic restructuring to which cities must submit
City politics : the political economy of urban America by Dennis R Judd( Book )
17 editions published between 2005 and 2015 in English and held by 285 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
[This text] has been revised to focus explicitly on the three distinct periods in the nation's urban development - the industrial era, the era of urban crisis, and the global era - and the economic priorities in each of these phrases.-Back cover
Debating democracy : a reader in American politics by Bruce Miroff( Book )
19 editions published between 1997 and 2012 in English and held by 276 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The democratic debate : an introduction to American politics by Bruce Miroff( Book )
10 editions published between 1995 and 2007 in English and held by 176 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Presents facts of American politics, organised around the theme of democracy. Each chapter examines the tension between elite and popular models of democracy and the impact of that tension on institutions, processes, and policy. This book presents a picture of popular democrats, from the anti-federalists to contemporary social movements
Place Matters : metropolitics for the twentyfirst century by Peter Dreier( Book )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 119 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Thoroughly revised and updated for its third edition, Place Matters examines the major trends and problems shaping our cities and suburbs, explores a range of policy solutions to address them, and looks closely at the potential political coalitions needed to put the country's "urban crisis" back on the public agenda"--
Debating democracy : a reader in American politics by Bruce Miroff( Book )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 49 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The effect of state and local taxes on investment : a bibliography by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
2 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 37 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Measuring concentrated poverty : did it really decline in the 1990s? by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
3 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Scholars In the United States have almost universally defined concentrated poverty as census tracts in which a high percentage of the population (usually 40% plus) falls below the official federal poverty line. Few studies have asked the question that we ask here: what is the underlying concept behind concentrated poverty and, therefore, what is the best method for measuring it? The basic concept behind concentrated poverty is that people in such areas are unable to participate fully in the society around them. Based on a minimally acceptable diet, the federal poverty standard has become increasingly divorced from the realities of our affluent society and ignores differences in living standards across metropolitan areas. A definition of poverty based on 50 percent of median income in each region more accurately identifies people who are cut-off from mainstream society. Using such a relative poverty standard we show that concentrated poverty did not decline in the 1990s, as researchers using the federal standard concluded, but instead grew. -- poverty ; concentrated poverty ; neighborhood effects
Going regional : community-based regionalism, transportation, and local hiring agreements by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
3 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Community-based regionalism (CBR) is the attempt by community-based organizations (CBOs) to reorient regional policies to benefit disadvantaged communities. Advocates of CBR have mostly called not for regional governments but for collaborative regional governance processes. This article examines the efforts of (CBOs) to form regional governance processes that target jobs from federally funded transportation projects to disadvantaged communities. Transportation policy has long been dominated by a policy monopoly centered on state departments of transportation and their highway engineers. By balancing conflict and collaboration, entrepreneurial CBOs have been able to penetrate this policy monopoly and negotiate successful local hiring agreements using collaborative regional governance processes. We conclude that success will be limited, however, without supportive federal and state policies
Regional resilience : a critical examination of the ecological framework by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
3 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 14 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The different responses of New York City to the terrorist attacks in 2001 and New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 have focused the attention of scholars on the ability of metropolitan areas to recover from disasters. In the case of New York City, despite dire warnings that people would flee urban settings that were vulnerable to terrorist attacks, the real estate market in lower Manhattan revived and is now as vibrant as ever. The painful memory remains, but the city has recovered from its wounds. New Orleans is another story. The immediate response to the hurricane was often uncoordinated and ineffectual. The long-run recovery has been slow and uneven. The population of the city is still only at about 72 percent of its pre-Katrina level and while the levees have been repaired they have not been built to withstand a category 5 hurricane like Katrina. It is still uncertain as to whether the city will recover enough to sustain the dynamic culture in food, music, and the arts that flourished before Katrina. The word that is increasingly used to describe successful responses to disasters like these is resilience.ʺ Resilience is an idea that can also be applied to slowly developing challenges as well as sudden disasters. The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of the resilience framework for thinking about how metropolitan areas respond to challenges.1 At this point in its applications to regional studies, resilience is more than a metaphor but less than a theory. At best it is a conceptual framework that helps us to think about regions in new ways, i.e., dynamically and holistically. As derived from the field of systems ecology, the resilience framework encourages us to think about regions as interconnected systems with extensive feedback processes that must be understood for successful human intervention
Regional resilience in the face of foreclosures : evidence from six metropolitan areas by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Based on approximately fifty interviews, along with analysis of data and newspaper coverage, this report compares local responses to surging foreclosures in three pairs of regions with similar housing markets and foreclosure-related challenges (St. Louis/Cleveland, East Bay/Riverside, and Chicago/Atlanta). The authors examine the choices made by leaders and organizations both to prevent foreclosures and to reduce their negative spillovers (neighborhood stabilization). Resilience is defined as the ability to alter organizational routines, garner additional resources, and collaborate within and between the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to address the foreclosure challenge. The research shows that resilience in the face of foreclosures varied significantly across and within metropolitan areas. The most resilient metropolitan areas had strong housing nonprofits and a history of collaboration between the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Many suburban areas have been hit hard by the foreclosure crisis, but they often lack the rich array of housing nonprofits and public sector planning capacity that is often present in central cities. The greatest obstacles to local resilience are the rigid and inflexible policies of lenders and loan servicers. The report concludes that resilience requires both horizontalʺ relations of trust and collaboration with regions and verticalʺ policies by higher level actors to support and empower local collaborations. Even the most resilient metropolitan areas cannot adequately address the crisis on their own. Federal and state policies can expand (or contract) the opportunity spaceʺ for local resilience. State laws, for instance, that lengthen short foreclosures processes give local actors more opportunity to prevent foreclosures and keep families in their homes or apartments. Local actors need the right kinds of policies by higher level actors to support metropolitan resilience. Likewise, state and federal policies will not be effective if local actors lack the capacity to organize responses that are adapted to local conditions. The authors conclude that state and federal policymakers need to address the problem of uneven capacity to respond to foreclosures both across and within metro areas
The crisis of growth politics : Cleveland, Kucinich, and the promise of urban populism by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The democratic debate by Bruce Miroff( Book )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The crisis of growth politics : Cleveland, Kucinich, and the limits of electoral reform by Todd Swanstrom( Book )
3 editions published between 1981 and 1984 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
More transit=more jobs the impact of increased funding for public transit ( )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
"Based on data from Transportation Improvement Programs in 20 metropolitan areas, this study shows that the proportion of total transportation dollars spent on transit varies from 15 percent to 75 percent. Metropolitan areas that give a higher priority to transit generate more jobs per dollar spent on transportation. If our 20 metropolitan areas shifted 50 percent of their highway funds to transit, they would generate 1,123,674 new transit jobs over a five-year period -- for a net gain of 180,150 jobs over five years -- without a single dollar of new spending"--from Executive Summary
Conflicts in urban and regional development ( )
in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
 
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English (112)
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