WorldCat Identities

Jones, Anson 1798-1858

Overview
Works: 95 works in 155 publications in 1 language and 2,278 library holdings
Genres: History  Sources  Biography  Records and correspondence  Treaties  Archives  Surveys  Commercial treaties 
Roles: Correspondent, Signer
Classifications: F389.J6, 976.404
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about  Anson Jones Publications about Anson Jones
Publications by  Anson Jones Publications by Anson Jones
posthumous Publications by Anson Jones, published posthumously.
Most widely held works about Anson Jones
 
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Most widely held works by Anson Jones
Memoranda and official correspondence relating to the Republic of Texas, its history and annexation; including a brief autobiography of the author by Anson Jones ( Book )
20 editions published between 1859 and 1975 in English and held by 616 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Letters relating to the history of annexation by Anson Jones ( )
9 editions published between 1848 and 1966 in English and held by 173 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Message from the President of the United States, communicating certain information in reply to a resolution of the Senate of the 22d May, 1844 by United States ( Book )
1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 20 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Republic of Texas, its history and annexation by Anson Jones ( Book )
3 editions published between 1966 and 1973 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Message from the President of the United States, communicating certain information in reply to a resolution of the Senate of the 22d May, 1844 .. June 1, 1844 by United States ( Book )
1 edition published in 1844 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Address by Anson Jones ( Book )
1 edition published in 1838 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Anson Jones : the last President of Texas by Herbert Pickens Gambrell ( Book )
2 editions published between 1948 and 1964 in Undetermined and English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Anson Jones came to Texas broke, many times a failure. Within a dozen years this hard-headed, unostentatious physician was to become soldier, congressman of the Republic of Texas, her most important diplomat, and her last President. He shaped the course of history better than he did his own life
Texas consular dispatches, records of the U.S. Department of State in the National Archives, Washington, D.C ( Book )
in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Some handwritten letters to the U.S. Secretary of State, Daniel Webster, and letters to the Texas Secretary of State, Anson Jones from Joseph Eve; mostly letters from Galveston, Republic of Texas; also includes some issues of "The National Vindicator" and "Texas National Register" both from Washington, D.C., and some issues of Houston newspapers, "Telegraph and Texas register," "The Morning Star, " and "The Citizen."
The diaries of Anson Jones during the age of the Republic of Texas by Mary Maynard McMurrey ( Book )
2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Department of State diplomatic correspondence by Texas (Republic) ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Diplomatic correspondence was created in the course of conducting diplomacy between the Republic of Texas and other nations (the United States of America, England, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, the Hanse towns (or Hanseatic League), Spain, the Papal States, Mexico, and the rebellious Mexican state of Yucatan). It consists of correspondence between the Republic of Texas' Department of State and diplomatic and consular representatives, both Texan and foreign, dating 1831-1832, 1835-1846, and undated. This correspondence documents the attempts, both successful and unsuccessful, by which Texas sought recognition, aid, and annexation into the Union. The letter books contain copies of both incoming and outgoing correspondence, and document negotiations for loans, and treaties of commerce and recognition, particularly a treaty with Mexico. U.S. diplomatic correspondence discusses Indian affairs, recognition and annexation of Texas by the United States, negotiations for loans, settlement of claims between the two countries, negotiations for duties, extradition, boundaries, and general information on relations with the United States and activities there as reported by the commissioners. English diplomatic correspondence discusses instructions from the Secretary of State to Texas representatives and their reports of activities back to him, claims against Texas for captured British vessels, commercial agreements, recognition of Texas independence, relations with Mexico, protection of British subjects in Texas, slavery and the slave trade, the Texas blockade of Mexican ports, and Texas' annexation to the United States. French diplomatic correspondence discusses instructions of the Department of State to its agents, letters of appointment, attempts to obtain commercial treaties, recognition of Texas independence by the French government, negotiations for a treaty of recognition with Spain, attempts to have France negotiate a treaty of peace and recognition between Texas and Mexico, and establishment of regular mail service between France and Texas. Correspondence relating to the diplomatic relations with Belgium, the Netherlands, Hanse towns, and Spain discusses the recognition of Texas in these countries and Texas' attempts to obtain treaties of amity and commerce. Correspondence relating to the diplomatic relations with Mexico discusses attempts to negotiate a treaty with Mexico, Mexican invasions of Texas, Texas prisoners in Mexico, negotiations with Yucatan for use of the Texas Navy, and the treaty of peace between Yucatan and Mexico; also, a few documents relate to domestic affairs, particularly Indian relations and the depreciation of Texas currency. Correspondence relating to the diplomatic relations with Yucatan includes the treaty by which Texas agreed to furnish naval support to Yucatan's revolution. Correspondents include Republic of Texas Secretaries of State Samuel P. Carson, Stephen F. Austin, James P. Henderson, Robert A. Irion, Barnard Bee, James Webb, David G. Burnet, Abner S. Lipscomb, Joseph Waples, Anson Jones, Ebenezer C. Allen, and Ashbel Smith; Republic of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar; Texas Minister to the United States Richard G. Dunlap; Texas chargés d'affaires to the United States James Reily, Joseph Eve, Isaac Van Zandt, and Charles H. Raymond; Texas Commissioners to the United States William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt; Texas chargé d'affaires to France George S. McIntosh; Texas chargé d'affaires to the Netherlands, Belgium, and the Hanseatic League, W. Henry Daingerfield; Texas diplomatic agent to Mexico James Treat; Republic of Texas financial agent James Hamilton; Texas Commodore Edwin W. Moore; U.S. Secretaries of State John Forsyth and John C. Calhoun; U.S. chargé d'affaires to the Republic of Texas Andrew J. Donelson; U.S. Senator Silas Wright Jr. (who supported Texas annexation); British Foreign Secretaries Viscount Palmerston (Henry John Temple) and the Earl of Aberdeen (George Hamilton Gordon); British chargé d'affaires to Texas Sir Charles Elliott; British minister to Mexico Richard Pakenham; French Foreign Ministers Count Molé (Louis Mathieu), and Francois Guizot; French chargés d'affaires Alphonse de Saligny and Jules Edouard de Cramayel; Mexican President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna; Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs Joaquin G. Rejon; and Colonel Martin F. Pereza of the Yucatan
Anson Jones by Herbert Pickens Gambrell ( Book )
1 edition published in 1948 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Texas diplomatic notes, records of the U.S. Department of State in the National Archives, Washington, D.C ( Book )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Communication from agents of Texas; some messages relate to Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, Mexican president at that time. Includes letters sent to Martin Van Buren, President of the U.S.; notes signed by the Texas governor of that period; the unanimous declaration of independence made by the delegates of the people of Texas in general convention on March 1, 1836, in Washington, D.C.; letters to John Foreyth, U.S. Secretary of State from Texas legislators M. Hunt and Anson Jones; an act entitled "An act to reduce into one act, and to amend the several acts relating to the establishment of a general land office," passed Dec. 1837; copy of an act to define the boundaries of the Republic of Texas
Thomas William Ward correspondence by Thomas William Ward ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Letters written while Commissioner, General Land Office in Austin, Texas, relating to Surveys and to the retention of the government archives by the citizens of Austin during the "Archive War". Included are copies of letters and accounts with Anson Jones and others
Secretary of State consular correspondence by Texas ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Consuls acted as representatives for the Republic of Texas providing potential immigrants with information regarding Texas, certifying documents, and giving information back to Texas regarding foreign attitudes towards the Republic. On December 18, 1837, the Congress of the Republic of Texas adopted the consular system of the United States for the government of the consular agents of the Republic of Texas, and delegated to the Secretary of State the duty of furnishing the Texan consuls with instruction "for the proper regulation of the commercial intercourse between this and foreign countries." Correspondence with Texan and foreign consuls was created in the course of conducting normal consular business, particularly the regulation of commercial ties between Texas and other nations. These records consist chiefly of letters and reports received in the Department of State of the Republic of Texas from agents and consuls, as well as letter books of consular correspondence, and registers of certificates, affidavits, and fees. The records date 1836-1850, 1873-1875, bulk 1836-1846. Some correspondence is from Texan consuls in Great Britain (cities of London, Liverpool), France (cities of Paris, Bordeaux, Marseilles, Le Havre), and other countries (cities of Amsterdam, Bremen, Calcutta), but the majority comes from the Texan consulate office in New Orleans. Other U.S. cities with Texas consular offices included New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Baltimore, Boston, Charleston, Cincinnati, Detroit, Mobile, Natchez, and Natchitoches. The finding aid contains a full list of Texan consuls, with dates of appointment, arranged by city to which they were assigned. Also included in these records is correspondence of the Department of State of the Republic of Texas with foreign consuls, all located in Galveston (1841-1845). Countries with consuls in Texas were the United States, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, and the Hanseatic League or Hanse towns. Subjects of both kinds of correspondence deal generally with the activities of Texan consuls in attempting to obtain loans, supplies, and favorable commercial relations from other nations, complaints of other nations against the Republic, and attitudes toward the Republic in other countries. Correspondents include William Bryan, David G. Burnet, Thomas Toby, Robert Triplett, Robert Irion, and Anson Jones. Also included are four letter books of consular correspondence, 1837-1845; three registers of certificates, affidavits, and fees from New Orleans, 1837-1841, giving name of person, service rendered by the consul, and fee; and a file regarding the efforts of the widow of Thomas Toby, agent for the Republic, 1836-1838, to collect state monies owed her husband for his services (this file is dated 1873-1875). A list of consuls is given in the online finding aid
Report of the Committee on Foreign Relations by Texas ( Book )
1 edition published in 1838 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Memoranda and official correspondence relating to the Republic of Texas : its history and annexation, 1836 to 1846 by Anson Jones ( Book )
1 edition published in 1966 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Located in Southwest Collection and Circulation
[Land grant] : Austin, [Tex.] by Texas ( Book )
1 edition published in 1843 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Family papers by Mary Smith McCrory Jones ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Correspondence, letters, legal documents, financial documents, and biographical material relating to Mary Jones' activities in Texas after the death of her husband, Anson Jones. Correspondents include her sons Samuel, Charles, and Cromwell, and her daughter Sallie. Also included is a family estate ledger and publications of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas (1901-1921)
 
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Languages
English (96)
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