WorldCat Identities

Ridge, Major approximately 1771-1839

Overview
Works: 22 works in 37 publications in 1 language and 3,942 library holdings
Genres: Claims  Treaties 
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Major Ridge
[Letter], 1823 Oct. 24, New Town, Cherokee Nation by Cherokee Nation( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

(Copy?) of a letter dated October 24, 1823 from the Cherokee Council to (U.S. Commissioners Duncan G. Campbell and James Meriwether?) concerning future cessions of land. The Cherokee government refuses to sell anymore land to the United States and offers several arguments for their position
[Letter], 1823 Oct. 20, Newtown( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Copy of a letter dated October 20, 1823 from the Cherokee Council to (U.S. Commissioners Duncan G. Campbell and James Meriwether?) in response to the commissioners' request for negotiation of further land cessions. The Council explains that the Cherokee government will not make anymore cessions of land and offers several arguments for this position
[Letter] 1824 Apr. 29, Washington, to Colo[nel] Thomas McKenney( )

2 editions published in 1824 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a letter from a delegation of Cherokee leaders, including John Ross, Elijah Hicks, George Lowery, and Major Ridge, to Colonel Thomas L. McKenney, of the Department of War, dated April 29, 1824. The delegation communicates a number of issues to McKenney from Principal Chiefs Charles R. Hicks and Path Killer. The bulk of the letter relates to the misconduct and abusive behavior of Joseph McMinn, U.S. agent to the Cherokees, and former Governor of Tennessee (1815-1821). In particular, McMinn had allowed unauthorized whites to settle in the Cherokee Nation, in violation of numerous treaties, and refused to prosecute them when they committed depredations within the Nation. They also discuss payment for improvements and claims under the treaties of 1817 and 1819, and the boundary line along the Unicoi Turnpike
[Letter] 1829 Aug. 29, New Echota [to] Gov[erno]r of Tennessee, William Carroll( )

1 edition published in 1829 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter from a delegation of Cherokee leaders, including John Ross, William Hicks, George Lowery, and Major Ridge, to William Carroll, Governor of Tennessee (1821-1827,1829-1835), dated August 29, 1829. The Cherokees express their unwillingness to convene a meeting with commissioners for the purpose of hearing proposals regarding removal to a territory west of the Mississippi River. They indicate that they have already informed the President and the Governor that they do not intend to sell more land now or in the future and convening a meeting for that purpose would be pointless
[Talk] 1823 Oct. 27, Newtown, to D[uncan] G. Campbell and Ja[me] Meriwether( )

1 edition published in 1823 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This document is a talk from the General Council of the Cherokee Nation to U.S. treaty commissioners Duncan G. Campbell and James Meriwether, dated October 27, 1823. The Council rebuts a number of unfounded accusations made by the commissioners in a recent talk they delivered. The Cherokee Council explains that they had no more land to sell and thus, negotiating a treaty for further land cessions would be useless. They refer to the Treaty of Holston and numerous other treaties in developing their argument. The talk is signed by a number of important Cherokee leaders including Pathkiller, Major Ridge, and John Ross
 
Audience Level
0
Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.19 (from 0.07 for Major Ridg ... to 0.99 for Christina ...)

Alternative Names
Major Ridge Cherokee leader

Major Ridge Chief 1771?-1839

Major Ridge Krieger und Häuptling der Cherokee

Ridge, Major 1771 (ca.)-1839

Ridge, Major ca. 1771-1839

Languages
English (31)

Covers
Cherokee cavaliers : forty years of Cherokee history as told in the correspondence of the Ridge-Watie-Boudinot family