WorldCat Identities

Stanford University Heuristic Programming Project

Overview
Works: 320 works in 373 publications in 1 language and 477 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Periodicals 
Classifications: QA76.9.E96, 001.535
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Stanford University
Palladio : an exploratory environment for circuit design by Harold Brown( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Palladio is a circuit design environment for experimenting with methodologies and knowledge-based, expert-system design aids. Palladio's framework is based on several premises about circuit design: (a) Circuit design is a process of incremental refinement; (b) It is an exploratory process in which design specifications and design goals co-evolve; and (c) Circuit designers need an integrated design environment that makes available compatible design tools ranging from simulators to layout generators, permits specification of digital systems in compatible languages ranging anywhere from architectural to layout, and includes the means for explicitly representing, constructing, and testing such design tools and languages
Strategic explanations for a diagnostic consultation system by Diane Warner Hasling( Book )

3 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This paper examines the problem of automatic explanation of reasoning, especially as it relates to expert systems. By explanation we mean the ability of a program to discuss what it is doing in some understandable way. We first present a general framework in which to view explanation and review some of the research done in this area. We then focus on the explanation system for NEOMYCIN, a medical consultation program. A consultation program interactively helps a user to solve a problem. Our goal is to have NEOMYCIN explain its problem-solving strategies. An explanation of strategy describes the plan the program is using to reach a solution. Such an explanation is usually concrete, referring to aspects of the current problem situation. Abstract explanations articulate a general principle, which can be applied in different situations; such explanations are useful in teaching and in explaining by analogy. We describe the aspects of NEOMYCIN that make abstract strategic explanations possible-the representation of strategic knowledge explicitly and separately from domain knowledge--and demonstrate how this representation can be used to generate explanations. (Author)
Guidon by William J Clancey( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

GUIDON is an intelligent computer-aided instructional program for teaching diagnosis, such as medical diagnosis. The program is general. Without reprogramming, the program can discuss with a student any diagnostic problem that it can solve on its own. Moreover, by substituting problem solving knowledge from other domains, the program can immediately discuss problems in those domains. This power derives from the use of Artificial Intelligence methods for representing both subject material and knowledge about how to teach. These are represented independently, so the teaching knowledge is general. There are teaching rules and procedures for: determining what the student knows, responding to his partial solution, providing hints, and opportunistically interrupting to test his understanding. Experience with GUIDON reveals the importance of separating out casual and strategic knowledge in order to explain diagnostic rules and to teach a reasoning approach. These lessons are now guiding the development of new representations for teaching. (Author)
Knowledge engineering : a daily activity on a hospital ward by Benoit Mulsant( Book )

2 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

SACON : a knowledge-based consultant for structural analysis by Stanford University( Book )

4 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In this report we describe an application of artificial intelligence (AI) methods to structural analysis. We describe the development and (partial) implementation of an 'automated consultant' to advise non-expert engineers in the use of a general-purpose structural analysis program. The analysis program numerically simualtes the behavior of a physical structure subjected to various mechanical loading conditions. The automated consultant, called SACON (Structural Analysis Consultant), is based on a version of the MYCIN program (Shortliffe 74) originally developed to advise physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases, The domain-specific knowledge in MYCIN is represented as situation-action rules, and is kept independent of the 'inference engine' that uses the rules. By subsituting structural engineering knowledge for the medical knowledge, the program was converted easily from the domain of infectious diseases to the domain of structural analysis. (Author)
BAOBAB, a parser for a rule-based system using a semantic grammar by A Bonnet( Book )

2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Deals among rational agents by Jeffrey S Rosenschein( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A formal framework is presented that models communication and promises in multi-agent interactions. This framework generalizes previous work on cooperation without communication, and shows the ability of communication to resolve conflicts among agents having disparate goals. Using a deal-making mechanism, agents are able to coordinate and cooperate more easily than in the communication-free model. In addition, there are certain types of interactions where communication makes possible mutually beneficial activity that is otherwise impossible to coordinate. Additional keywords: artificial intelligence; game theory; theorems; mathematical models. (Author)
Controlling recursive inference by David E Smith( Book )

2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Loosely speaking, recursive inference is when an inference procedure generates an infinite sequence of similar subgoals. In general the control of recursive inference involves demonstrating that recursive portions of a search space will not contribute any new answers to the problem beyond a certain level. We first review a well known syntactic method for controlling repeating inference (inference where the conjuncts processed are instances of the ancestors), provide a proof that it is correct, and discuss the conditions under which the strategy is optimal. We also derive more powerful pruning theorems for cases involving transitivity axioms and cases involving subsumed subgoals. The treatment of repeating inference is followed by consideration of the more difficult problem of recursive inference that does not repeat. Here we show how knowledge of the properties of the relations involved and knowledge about the contents of the system's database can be used to prove that portions of a search space will not contribute any new answers
The EMYCIN manual by William J Van Melle( Book )

2 editions published in 1981 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Knowledge engineering, the applied side of artificial intelligence by Edward A Feigenbaum( Book )

1 edition published in 1980 in English and held by 5 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Expert System research in an emerging area of computer science that exploits the capabilities of computers for symbolic manipulation and inference to solve complex and difficult reasoning problems at the level of performance of human experts. The methods of this area are designed to acquire and represent both the formal and the informal knowledge that experts hold about the tasks of their discipline. Numerous applications to science, engineering, and medicine have been accomplished. Expert System projects represent applied artificial intelligence research, though they also make salient numerous fundamental research issues in the acquisition, representation and utilization of knowledge by computer programs. Knowledge engineering approaches promise significant cost savings in certain applications; intelligent computer-based aids for practitioners in fields whose knowledge is primarily nonmathematical; and the elucidation of the heuristic knowledge of experts -- the largely private knowledge of practice. There are major problems of knowledge engineering including the shortage of adequate computer equipment, the shortage of trained specialists in applied artificial intelligence, the scientific base for adequate knowledge acquisition, and the lack of sustained funding. (Author)
Induction over large data bases by J. R Quinlan( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Techniques for discovering rules by induction from large collections of instances are developed. These are based on an iterative scheme for dividing the instances into two sets, only one of which needs to be randomly accessible. These techniques have made it possible to discover complex rules from data bases containing many thousand of instances. Results of several experiments using them are reported. (Author)
ROGET : a knowledge-based consultant for acquiring the conceptual structure of an expert system by James Bennett( Book )

1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Rule-based expert systems : the MYCIN experiments of the Stanford Heuristic Programming Project by Bruce G Buchanan( Book )

2 editions published between 1984 and 1985 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Report by Stanford University( )

in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Selection of KSL/HPP research literature appropriate to AI
Two papers on medical computing by Edward Hance Shortliffe( Book )

2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Classification problem solving by William J Clancey( Book )

1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

In an attempt to specify in some canonical terms what many heuristic programs known as "expert systems" do, an analysis was made of ten rule-based systems. It was found that these programs proceed through easily identifiable phases of data abstraction, heuristic mapping onto a hierarchy of pre-enumerated solutions, and refinement within this hierarchy: that is, they do classification. Focusing on content rather than representational technology, this paper proposes a set of terms and relations for describing the knowledge used to solve a problem by classification. Then the model used in analyzing the programs mycin, sacon, grundy, and sophie iii is described and illustrated. These programs have a characteristic inference structure; moreover, this level of description specifies the knowledge needed to solve a problem, independent of its representation in a particular computer language. The classification problem-solving model provides a useful framework for recognizing and representing similar problems, for designing representation tools, and for understanding the problem-solving methods used by non-classification programs. (Mns)
Schema-shift strategies to understanding structured texts in natural language by Stanford University( Book )

1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Solving the Prisoner's dilemma by Michael R Genesereth( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

A framework is proposed for analyzing various types of rational interaction. We consider a variety of restrictions on participants' moves; each leads to a different characterization of rational behavior. Under an assumption of common rationality, it is proven that participants will cooperate, rather than defect, in the Prisoner's Dilemma. We will follow the usual convention of representing a game as a payoff matrix. This is a unified framework for considering various types of interactions that occur without communication. Using assumptions about what types of moves other agents will make, a participant is able to reason about what constitutes rational behavior on its own part. Several of the characterizations of rationality have parallels in existing game theory literature, and lead to familiar results such as case analysis and iterated case analysis
BB1 : an architecture for blackboard systems that control, explain, and learn about their own behavior by Barbara Hayes-Roth( Book )

2 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Memo( )

in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Audience level: 0.76 (from 0.51 for Rule-based ... to 1.00 for Applied ar ...)

Alternative Names

controlled identityStanford University. Computer Science Department

Heuristic Programming Project

HPP

Stanford Heuristic Programming Project

Stanford University. Computer Science Department. Heuristic Programming Project

Stanford University. Computer Science Dept. Heuris tic Programming Project

Stanford University Department of Computer Science Heuristic Programming Project

Stanford University Department of Computer Science Stanford Heuristic Programming Project

StanfordUniversity Stanford Heuristic Programming Project

Languages
English (44)