WorldCat Identities

McGillivray, Alexander approximately 1740-1793

Overview
Works: 58 works in 87 publications in 2 languages and 1,379 library holdings
Genres: Treaties  History  Records and correspondence  Sources  Archives 
Classifications: GV969.N342,
Publication Timeline
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Publications about  Alexander McGillivray Publications about Alexander McGillivray
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posthumous Publications by Alexander McGillivray, published posthumously.
Most widely held works about Alexander McGillivray
 
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Most widely held works by Alexander McGillivray
Treaty with the Creeks by Creek Nation ( Book )
1 edition published in 1790 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Treaty signed by Alexander McGillivray of Pensacola, and 26 Creek Indian chiefs with President George Washington pledging mutual peace and friendship
45 years golf in Nairn by Alexander McGillivray ( Book )
1 edition published in 1957 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
[Letter] 1788 Apr. 11, Little Tallassie, Upper Creek [Nation, to] Colo[nel] Joseph Martin by Alexander McGillivray ( )
1 edition published in 1788 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document is a letter from Creek leader Alexander McGillivray, at Little Tallassie (Alabama), to Colonel Joseph Martin, U.S. agent to the Cherokee Nation, dated April 11, 1788. McGillivray informs Martin of the state of relations between the Creeks and the Cumberland settlers who murdered some Creeks while trading with French merchants at Muscle Shoals. Despite this attack, and the retaliation of a party of Creeks, McGillivray indicates his earnest willingness to establish a peace with them. He also mentions relations with the Georgians, with whom he also desires peace, if they demonstrate reciprocal respect
Copy of Alex[ander] McGillivray's talk to the Governor of Georgia, 1786 Aug. 3, Tuckabatchee, [Creek Nation] by Alexander McGillivray ( )
1 edition published in 1786 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a copy of Alexander McGillivray's talk to the governor of Georgia, dated August 8, 1786. In this talk, McGillivray says that a man called Yellow Hair by the Creeks (Daniel McMurphy, treaty commissioner for the state of Georgia) had demanded a meeting with the Creek chiefs the previous summer but left for Augusta before the meeting took place. McGillivray says that he would like to hear what the governor or his commissioners have to say. He warns them, however, not to deal with the Tame King or the Fat King, neither of whom has the authority to cede any Creek land. He also notes that he has sent the governor and council several talks condemning white settlements on Creek hunting grounds near the Oconee River but has never received a response. He asks the governor to respond and warns him again. This copy was apparently prepared by the executive council's secretary, James M. Stewart
[Letter] 1786 Sept. 16, Tuckebatches, [Creek Nation] by Alexander McGillivray ( )
1 edition published in 1786 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a letter dated September 16, 1786 from Creek leader Alexander McGillivray to an unnamed Georgia official. McGillivray says that he recently received a letter from John Galphin, a mixed blood Creek who served as a liaison and interpreter between the Creeks and the state of Georgia, requesting that McGillivray meet him in Tuckebatches (also Tuckabatchie, Tuckabatchee) to receive some dispatches from the Georgia commissioners, but that when he arrived Galphin refused to meet with him in person. McGillivray warns the recipient of this letter to therefore disregard any report that Galphin may give him, as he is inexperienced in dealing with the Indians in an acceptable manner. He writes that, if the commissioners are serious about peace, they should prove it by ordering white settlers on Creek hunting grounds near the Oconee River to leave the area. McGillivray is adamant that this is the only way to satisfy the Creeks and prevent war
by Alexander McGillivray ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Of special interest is the 1789 Dec. 1 letter from McGillivray to the Spanish West Florida governor, Zespedes, regarding the meeting between McGillivray and the U.S. Indian Commission on the Oconee River in 1790 Sept., and the acceptance of the U.S. treaty proposal by McGillivray, and other subjects. There is also a letter, 1792, from McGillivray to Secretary of War Henry Knox regarding the Americans in Georgia completely ignoring the treaty between the Creek nation and the U.S. There are also several letters, 1784-1789, from McGillivray to the other partners in Panton, Leslie and Co. in Pensacola, Fla., and Mobile, Ala., including William Panton, John Leslie, and Charles MacLatchy regarding relations between the Creeks, the U.S., and Spain
[Letter] 1786 Nov. 28, Tuckabatches, [Creek Nation to] John Habersham, Augusta, Georgia by Alexander McGillivray ( )
1 edition published in 1786 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a letter dated November 28, 1786 from Creek leader Alexander McGillivray to John Habersham, chairman of the commissioners for Indian Affairs in Georgia. McGillivray reports that John Galphin, a mixed blood Creek who served as an interpreter and a liaison between the Creeks and the state of Georgia, and Daniel McMurphy, a Creek agent for the state of Georgia, have arrived in Tuckabatche(e) (also Tuckabatchie) requesting a meeting with the Creek chiefs in order to read them a talk from the governor's board of commissioners. McGillivray complains that McMurphy has not given him a copy of the talk but says that Galphin has informed him of the substance of the talk. He maintains that the Indians do not owe the state anything as they have not breached any treaties, and he warns the state to give up its claims for satisfaction in the form of property or risk renewed bloodshed. McGillivray indicates that he plans to call a convention of the Upper and Lower Creeks for the following April and that John Galphin should plan to attend and deliver a talk that is agreeable to the wishes McGillivray has expressed on behalf of the chiefs
Letter[s], 1785 Apr. 24, Tuckebatches, [Creek Nation] to W[illia]m Clark by Alexander McGillivray ( )
1 edition published in 1785 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This document contains two letters, the first dated April 24, 1785 and the second undated, from Creek leader Alexander McGillivray in Tuckebatches (also Tuckabatchie, Tuckabatchee) to treaty commissioner William Clark. In the first letter, McGillivray complains that a talk sent to the chiefs in the lower towns should not have been sent directly to them. He tells Clark that the chiefs will not be called to meetings by traders or other unauthorized persons. He goes on to say that he opposes white settlement of the lands near the Oconee River, because he thinks that the settlers will eventually claim land down to the Ocmulgee River as well. McGillivray mentions Governor Samuel Elbert (Governor of Georgia, 1785-1786) and warns that he must put a stop to trade houses in Creek territory or they will be attacked. In the second letter, McGillivray reports that he is setting off for Pensacola and then (New) Orleans for an important meeting called by Bernardo de Galvez, Governor of Spanish Louisiana (1777-1783) and Viceroy of New Spain (1785-1786). McGillivray also reminds Clark that he has yet to make good on his promise to visit Tuckabatchee (also Tuckabatchie) and smoke the peace pipe
Papers of Andrew Pickens by Andrew Pickens ( )
in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
There are also a few items related to General Pickens' son, Andrew Pickens (1779-1838), Governor of South Carolina in 1816-1818, including two letters to him from Thomas Flournoy (1820)
Letter, 1784 June 30, Little Tallassie, [Creek Nation] by Alexander McGillivray ( )
1 edition published in 1784 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a letter dated June 30, 1784 from Creek leader Alexander McGillivray to an unidentified Georgia official (possibly John Houstoun, Governor of Georgia, 1784) regarding reports of Georgians surveying land on the Oconee River that the Fat King and the Tallassie (also Tallassee) King had supposedly ceded. McGillivray says that he called a general council, where the Tallassie (also Tallassee) King said in his own defense that he and the Fat King had been threatened with death by the Georgians in Augusta unless they signed away the land in question. McGillivray also says that in 1782, General Anthony Wayne and Alexander Martin, Governor of North Carolina (1782-1785, 1789-1792), sent a "liberal and generous" talk to the Nation which he embraced as a gesture of peace but the wording was later ignominiously changed to depict the states as "conquerors." McGillivray calls on the states to change their attitude towards the Creeks immediately and to respect their position as a free nation if they expect to avoid an Indian wa
 
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Alternative Names
MacGillivray, Alexander ca. ca. 1740-1793
McGillivray, Alexander, 1740 ca.-1793
McGillivray, Alexander, ca. 1740-1793
Languages
English (55)
French (1)
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