WorldCat Identities

Stevenson, David John 1948-

Overview
Works: 35 works in 49 publications in 1 language and 100 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  Observations 
Roles: Author, Editor, Thesis advisor
Classifications: QC806, 550
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by David John Stevenson
Evolution of the Earth by David John Stevenson( Book )
5 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 41 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This title focuses on the formation of Earth, core and continents, outgassing and volcanism, development of plate tectonics, origin and persistence of Earth's magnetic field, growth of the inner core, changes in mantle convection through time, and impact of biology.--
Treatise on geophysics ( Book )
5 editions published between 2007 and 2009 in English and held by 15 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The interior of Jupiter by David John Stevenson( )
3 editions published between 1976 and 1982 in English and held by 4 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Unveiling the solar system 30 years of exploration : [lectures presented at] Nobel Conference XXXIII, Oct. 7 and 8, 1997 by Nobel Conference( Recording )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Interpretation of lunar topography : impact cratering and surface roughness by Margaret Anne Rosenburg( )
2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This work seeks to understand past and present surface conditions on the Moon using two different but complementary approaches: topographic analysis using high-resolution elevation data from recent spacecraft missions and forward modeling of the dominant agent of lunar surface modification, impact cratering. The first investigation focuses on global surface roughness of the Moon, using a variety of statistical parameters to explore slopes at different scales and their relation to competing geological processes. We find that highlands topography behaves as a nearly self-similar fractal system on scales of order 100 meters, and there is a distinct change in this behavior above and below approximately 1 km. Chapter 2 focuses this analysis on two localized regions: the lunar south pole, including Shackleton crater, and the large mare-filled basins on the nearside of the Moon. In particular, we find that differential slope, a statistical measure of roughness related to the curvature of a topographic profile, is extremely useful in distinguishing between geologic units. Chapter 3 introduces a numerical model that simulates a cratered terrain by emplacing features of characteristic shape geometrically, allowing for tracking of both the topography and surviving rim fragments over time. The power spectral density of cratered terrains is estimated numerically from model results and benchmarked against a 1-dimensional analytic model. The power spectral slope is observed to vary predictably with the size-frequency distribution of craters, as well as the crater shape. The final chapter employs the rim-tracking feature of the cratered terrain model to analyze the evolving size-frequency distribution of craters under different criteria for identifying "visible" craters from surviving rim fragments. A geometric bias exists that systematically over counts large or small craters, depending on the rim fraction required to count a given feature as either visible or erased
Chemical and isotopic consequences of lunar formation via giant impact by Kaveh Pahlevan( )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Treatise on geophysics by Gerald Schubert( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The Treatise on Geophysics on a comprehensive summary of the present state of geophysics. It deals with all major parts of Solid-Earth Geophysics, including a volume on the terrestrial planets and moons in our solar system
Characterization of exoplanet atmospheres : spectral retrieval and chemistry by Michael Robert Line( Book )
2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Orbits and interiors of planets by Konstantin Batygin( )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
New insights from the magnetic fields of planets and satellites by David John Stevenson( Visual )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Dr. David Stevenson, George Van Osdol Professor of Planetary Science, Division of Geological and Planetary Science, Caltech, outlines the conditions needed for a dynamo, including the relationship of giant planet fields to their high pressure properties, focussing on the interesting new results for Mars
Origin of the Moon : challenges and prospects ( )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
I: Remote spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric HDO/H₂O and column CO₂ ; II: interannual variations of the earth's reflectance by Zhiming Kuang( Book )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Formation of Giant Planets by David John Stevenson( )
1 edition published in 2004 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This is a descriptive and non-mathematical summary of giant planet formation theories. There are two end-member models, core accretion and disk instability. In the core accretion model, several to ten Earth masses of solid (ice and rock) accumulate and this promotes subsequent gas accretion. In the disk instability model, a self-gravitating sphere of gas forms (somewhat analogous to star formation) and a core may arise through condensation and rainout from its low density envelope. The core accretion model may have a time-scale difficulty because the formation of the embryo and infall of gas is not fast relative to the time at which the gaseous disk is removed. The disk instability model suffers from the current theoretical inability to follow the development of these putative instabilities through to the formation of a planet. Observational data on core masses in Jupiter and Saturn do not clearly favor one model. However, the existence and nature of Uranus and Neptune strongly suggest that the formation of appropriate embryos occurs. Moreover, there is considerable flexibility in the elapsed time required to form Jupiter and Saturn by the core accretion model, including times of only a few million years, compatible with disk lifetimes. This suggests that core accretion remains the favored mode in our solar system. It is possible that both mechanisms operate in general and that many extrasolar planetary systems make use of the disk instability mode. Future theory and observations are essential for deciding this issue
Treatise on geophysics ( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Metallic helium in massive planets by David John Stevenson( )
1 edition published in 2008 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
In this issue of PNAS, Stixrude and Jeanloz (4) show that band closure in pure helium occurs at lower pressures than previously thought, provided the effect of high temperatures is taken into account. This suggests that helium behaves as a metal, at least at the highest pressures encountered in Jupiter and perhaps over a wider range of pressures in the many, often much hotter, planets of Jupiter’s mass and larger that are now evidently common in the universe (5). The full thermodynamic and transport properties of the relevant mixtures cannot be deduced from the behavior of the end members (pure hydrogen and pure helium) and are therefore an area of ongoing research
Unveiling the solar system 30 years of exploration : [lectures presented at] Nobel Conference XXXIII, Oct. 7 and 8, 1997 by Nobel Conference( Visual )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
States of matter in massive planets by David John Stevenson( )
1 edition published in 1998 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
This brief article addresses the question: among the very large number of interesting condensed matter physics issues, which are particularly interesting from a planetary perspective? Following some definitions and background, it is argued that we need to understand relevant first-order phase transitions (especially the nature of the hydrogen phase diagram), the behaviour of the entropy (i.e., the Gruneisen parameter), the solubility and partitioning of minor elements (e.g. noble gases mixed with hydrogen), and microscopic transport properties, especially electrical and thermal conductivity. Examples are presented of how these issues influence current interpretations of the observations of Jupiter in particular. In the future, it may be possible to observe spectroscopically the compositions of extra-solar-system planets and brown dwarfs, and thereby learn more about the physics of these bodies
Planetary Magnetic Fields: Achievements and Prospects by David John Stevenson( )
1 edition published in 2010 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
The past decade has seen a wealth of new data, mainly from the Galilean satellites and Mars, but also new information on Mercury, the Moon and asteroids (meteorites). In parallel, there have been advances in our understanding of dynamo theory, new ideas on the scaling laws for field amplitudes, and a deeper appreciation on the diversity and complexity of planetary interior properties and evolutions. Most planetary magnetic fields arise from dynamos, past or present, and planetary dynamos generally arise from thermal or compositional convection in fluid regions of large radial extent. The relevant electrical conductivities range from metallic values to values that may be only about one percent or less that of a typical metal, appropriate to ionic fluids and semiconductors. In all planetary liquid cores, the Coriolis force is dynamically important. The maintenance and persistence of convection appears to be easy in gas giants and ice-rich giants, but is not assured in terrestrial planets because the quite high electrical conductivity of an iron-rich core guarantees a high thermal conductivity (through the Wiedemann-Franz law), which allows for a large core heat flow by conduction alone. This has led to an emphasis on the possible role of ongoing differentiation (growth of an inner core or “snow”). Although planetary dynamos mostly appear to operate with an internal field that is not very different from (2ρΩ/σ)1/2 in SI units where ρ is the fluid density, Ω is the planetary rotation rate and σ is the conductivity, theoretical arguments and stellar observations suggest that there may be better justification for a scaling law that emphasizes the buoyancy flux. Earth, Ganymede, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and probably Mercury have dynamos, Mars has large remanent magnetism from an ancient dynamo, and the Moon might also require an ancient dynamo. Venus is devoid of a detectable global field but may have had a dynamo in the past. Even small, differentiated planetesim
A Grand Tour in Its Historical Context by David John Stevenson( )
1 edition published in 2010 in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide
Pyne blends a history of the Voyager project with reflections on the role of exploration in human society
 
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Alternative Names
Stevenson, D.J.
Stevenson, D. J. 1948-
Stevenson, Dave 1948-
Stevenson, David.
Stevenson, David 1948-
Stevenson, David J. 1948-
Languages
English (28)
Covers