WorldCat Identities

Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Overview
Works: 315 works in 351 publications in 1 language and 1,075 library holdings
Genres: Bibliography‡vCatalogs 
Classifications: Q334.5, 016.0063
Publication Timeline
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Publications by Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Publications by Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Most widely held works about Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
 
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Most widely held works by Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Memo ( )
in English and held by 13 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Catalogue, Artificial intelligence memoranda of the AI Laboraory, Computer Science Department, Stanford University, 1963-1982 ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Artificial intelligence memoranda of the AI Laboratory, Computer Science Department, Stanford University, 1963-1982 ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 12 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Artificial intelligence memoranda ( Book )
6 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 11 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Computer generation of natural language from a deep conceptual base by Neil Murray Goldman ( )
2 editions published in 1974 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
For many tasks involving communication between humans and computers it is necessary for the machine to produce as well as understand natural language. We describe an implemented system which generates English sentences from Conceptual Dependency networks, which are unambiguous, language-free representations of meaning. The system is designed to be task independent, and thus capable of providing the language generation mechanism for such diverse problem areas as question answering, machine translation, and interviewing
SAIL user manual by K Vanlehn ( Book )
2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 10 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
SAIL is a high-level programming language for the PDP-10 computer. It includes an extended ALGOL 60 compiler and a companion set of execution-time routines. In addition to ALGOL, the language features: (1) flexible linking to hand-coded machine language algorithms, (2) complete access to the PDP-10 1/0 facilities, (3) a complete system of compile-time arithmetic and logic as well as a flexible macro system, (4) user modifiable error handling, (5) backtracking, and (6) interrupt facilities. Furthermore, a subset of the SAIL language, called LEAP, provides facilities for (1) sets and lists, (2) an associative data structure, (3) independent processes, and (4) procedure variables. The LEAP subset of SAIL is an extension of the LEAP language, which was designed by J. Feldman and P. Rovner, and implemented on Lincoln Laboratory's TX-2. This manual describes the SAIL language and the execution-time routines for the typical SAIL user: a non-novice programmer with some knowledge of ALGOL. It lies somewhere between being a tutorial and a reference manual. (Modified author abstract)
Parallel programming : an axiomatic approach by C. A. R Hoare ( Book )
2 editions published in 1973 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The paper develops some ideas expounded in a previous paper. It distinguishes a number of ways of using parallelism, including disjoint processes, competition, cooperation, communication and colluding. In each case an axiomatic proof rule is given. Some light is thrown on traps or ON conditions. The program structuring methods described in the report are not suitable for the construction of operating systems
Artificial intelligence memoranda. catalogue ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Circumscription a form of non-monotonic reasoning by John McCarthy ( Book )
2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Adverbs and belief by Roger C Schank ( Book )
1 edition published in 1972 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The treatment of a certain class of adverbs in conceptual representation is given. Certain adverbs are shown to be representative of complex belief structures. These adverbs serve as pointers that explain where the sentence that they modify belongs in a belief structure. (Author)
Essential E by Arthur Michael Samuel ( Book )
2 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The goals of linguistic theory revisited by Roger C Schank ( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Winged edge polyhedron representation by Bruce Guenther Baumqart ( Book )
3 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
A winged edge polyhedron representation is stated and a set of primitives that preserve Euler's F-E+V = 2 equation are explained. Present use of this representation in Artificial Intelligence for computer graphics and world modeling is illustrated and its intended future application to computer vision is described
Project technical report by Stanford Artificial Intelligence Project ( Book )
2 editions published between 1969 and 1970 in English and held by 7 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Recent work of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Project is summarized in several areas: Scientific hypothesis formation; Symbolic computation; Hand-eye systems; Computer recognition of speech; Board games; and Other projects. (Author)
A conceptually based sentence paraphraser by Neil M Goldman ( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
The report describes a system of programs which performs natural language processing based on an underlying language free (conceptual) representation of meaning. This system is used to produce sentence paraphrases which demonstrate a form of understanding with respect to a given context. Particular emphasis was placed on the major subtasks of language analysis (mapping natural language into conceptual structures) and language generation (mapping conceptual structures into natural language), and on the interaction between these processes and a conceptual memory model. (Author)
FOL : a proof checker for first-order logic by Richard W Weyhrauch ( Book )
1 edition published in 1974 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This manual describes the use of the interactive proof checker FOL. FOL implements a version of the system of natural deduction described by Prawitz, augmented in the following ways: (1) it is a many-sorted first-order logic and a partial order over sorts may be declared: this reduces the size of formulas; (2) purely propositional deductions can be made in a single step; (3) the truth values of assertions involving numerical and LISP constants can be derived by computation; (4) there is a limited ability to make metamathematical arguments; and (5) there are many operational conveniences. The goal of FOL is to use formal proof techniques as practical tools for checking proofs in pure mathematics and proofs of the correctness of programs. It is also intended to be used as a research tool in modelling common-sense reasoning in the representation theory of artificial intelligence
The modal logic of programs by Zohar Manna ( Book )
2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
This document explores the general framework of Modal Logic and its applicability to program reasoning. The authors relate the basic concepts of Modal Logic to the programming environment: the concept of world corresponds to a program state, and the concept of accessibility relation corresponds to the relation of derivability between states during execution. The Temporal interpretation of Modal Logic is adopted. The variety of program properties expressible within the modal formalism is demonstrated. The first axiomatic system studied, the sometime system, is adequate for proving total correctness and 'eventuality' properties. However, it is inadequate for proving invariance properties. The stronger nexttime system obtained by adding the next operator is shown to be adequate for invariances as well. Additional keywords: computer logic. (Author)
The development of conceptual structures in children by Roger C Schank ( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Previous papers have hypothesized that it is possible to represent the meaning of natural language sentences using a framework which has only fourteen primitive ACTs. The paper addresses the problem of when and how these ACTs might be learned by children. The speech of a child of age 2 is examined for possible knowledge of the primitive ACTs as well as the conceptual relations underlying language. It is shown that there is evidence that the conceptual structures underlying language are probably complete by age 2. Next a child is studied from birth to age 1. The emergence of the primitive ACTs and the conceptual relations is traced. The hypothesis is made that the structures that underlie and are necessary for language are present by age 1. (Author)
Preference semantics by Yorick Wilks ( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Preference semantics (PS) is a set of formal procedures for representing the meaning structure of natural language, with a view to embodying that structure within a system that can be said to understand, rather than within the 'derivational paradigm', of transformational grammar (TG) and generative semantics (GS), which seeks to determine the well-formedness, or otherwise, of sentences. A system of preference semantics is outlined in which for each phase or clause of a complex sentence, the system builds up a network of lexical trees with the aid of structured items called templates and, at the next level, it structures those networks with higher level items called paraplates and common-sense inference rules. At each stage the system directs itself towards the correct network by always opting for the most 'semantically dense' one it can construct. It is suggested that this opting for the 'greatest semantic density' can be seen as an interpretation of Joos' 'Semantic Axiom Number 1'. It is argued that the analysis of quite simple examples requires the use of inductive rules of inference which cannot, theoretically cannot, be accommodated within the derivational paradigm. (Modified author abstract)
An overview of production systems by Randall Davis ( Book )
1 edition published in 1975 in English and held by 6 WorldCat member libraries worldwide
Since production systems were first proposed in 1943 as a general computational mechanism, the methodology has seen a great deal of development and has been applied to a diverse collection of problems. Despite the wide scope of goals and perspectives demonstrated by the various systems, there appear to be many recurrent themes. This paper is an attempt to provide an analysis and overview of those themes, as well as a conceptual framework by which many of the seemingly disparate efforts can be viewed, both in relation to each other, and to other methodologies. Accordingly, the authors use the term 'production system' in a broad sense, and attempt to show how most systems which have used the term can be fit into the framework. The comparison to other methodologies is intended to provide a view of PS characteristics in a broader context, with primary reference to procedurally-based techniques, but with reference also to some of the current developments in programming and the organization of data and knowledge bases
 
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Audience level: 0.85 (from 0.00 for Academic c ... to 1.00 for Artificial ...)
Associated Subjects
Artificial intelligence Artificial intelligence--Research Automatic speech recognition--Research Buchanan, Bruce G Carnegie-Mellon University Carnegie-Mellon University.--Computer Science Department Case Institute of Technology Children--Language Computational linguistics Computer graphics Computer programming Computer programs--Verification Computers Computer science Computer vision Concept learning Cornell University Defense contracts English language--Adverb Federal aid to research Feigenbaum, Edward A Generative grammar Language acquisition Licklider, J. C. R Linguistics Massachusetts Institute of Technology McCarthy, John Miller, William F Modality (Logic) Moore School of Electrical Engineering National Institute of Mental Health (U.S.) National Institutes of Health (U.S.) Natural language processing (Computer science) Nilsson, Nils J., Nonmonotonic reasoning Northwestern University (Evanston, Ill.) Ohio State University Parallel programming (Computer science) Project MAC (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Proof theory--Data processing Reasoning--Data processing Simon, Herbert A.--(Herbert Alexander), Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory Stanford University.--Applied Mathematics and Statistics Laboratory Stanford University.--Computer Science Department Text editors (Computer programs) Traub, J. F.--(Joseph Frederick), United States United States.--Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.--Information Processing Techniques Office University of California, Berkeley
Alternative Names

controlled identity Stanford Artificial Intelligence Project

Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
School of Humanities and Sciences Department of Computer Science Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
School of Humanities and Sciences Department of Computer Science Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Stanford University. Computer Science Department. AI Laboratory
Stanford University. Computer Science Department. Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Stanford University Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Languages
English (43)