WorldCat Identities

Walton, George 1749 or 1750-1804

Overview
Works: 87 works in 108 publications in 1 language and 377 library holdings
Genres: History  Records and correspondence  Portraits  Constitution  Treaties 
Roles: Author
Classifications: Z1215, 975.8
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works about George Walton
 
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Most widely held works by George Walton
Observations upon the effects of certain late political suggestions by George Walton( Book )

11 editions published between 1781 and 1847 in English and held by 78 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

[Title(s) available in Evans] by George Walton( Book )

in Undetermined and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Augusta, to [James Jackson?] by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1795 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Informing him he is "just on the wing for Philadelphia. You will have seen my motives, expressed with candor, in the public prints. The ensuing Session of Congress will be most important. I told Milledge when he was up, without the smallest idea of anticipation, that no crisis since the Revolution made me feel a wish again to be a member before the present. The occasion is trying : in it I will do my duty, most assuredly, without other consideration than a sense of right. This short address is, simply to say, that our correspondence shall be renewed on my part. Expect from me, therefore, a picture of things as I find them."
to the Auditor-General at Augusta by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1780 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Requesting payment for his "Confinement with the Enemy, 8 months", for a month and a half "acting in the office of Government" and for his attendance in the Assembly for 30 days for a total invoice of $8,750
[Documents] by William Churchill Houston( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Summons, affidavit and decision for the court case: Patton v. Holmes. On preprinted form. The document is also signed by George Walton, then the chief justice of the State of Georgia, 1783 Feb. 12. -- Notice of court sessions, 1785 Jan. 5
[Savannah], to [John Walton] by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1778 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Relating accounts of "twenty seven sail of vessels having come in and anchored in Warsaw Sound ... Robert's Artillery & Thompson's horse are here which promises well - If they are only Tory Refugees from New York, I hope we shall give a proper account of them. General Howe, who is yet here, says he has accounts of 50 sail being off Eddisto - If this is the Case, the Invasion is general - concerted - and formidable - One way or other, however, I doubt not we shall weather the Storm; for why should we be lost in particular? I have seen the affairs of the Continent 40,000 times blacker."
by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1776 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

In this letter, George Walton asks on behalf of himself, Joseph Pannel, Robert Walton, and Samuel Scott permission of the "Honorable President of the Convention" that he might recruit 300 men from the inhabitants of the colony of Virginia to armed service in Georgia. Below this letter is a note dated 6 June 1776 from the Convention stating that a Mr. Drayton and a Mr. Elliot of South Carolina will also be allowed to recruit in Virginia
Savannah, to [Dorothy Walton] by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1779 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Expressing his happiness that she is safely in Carolina; asking that she remain with her sister until she hears from him and reporting that her mother remains very ill and he fears "she cannot long survive;" saying he had been wounded in his thigh and a bone is broken but that he is getting good care; asking her to "Be, therefore, of good spirits; and let me not hear by every flag that you are inconsolable, which will only operate to depress mine. At any rate, you ought to recollect, that in these troublesome times you have no right to expect a life of superior tranquility to your neighbors;" reminding her that she is "sincerely loved by a man who wishes to make honor & reputation the rule of all his actions."
Augusta, Ga., to Gen. Benjamin Lincoln by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1779 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Assures Lincoln that the people of Georgia have not given up hope in the face of his recent defeat, and discusses an exchange of prisoners
W. Newton Morris Charitable Foundation collection( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

The collection consists of five historic documents: 1.) James Southall agreement; 2.) Indenture agreement, January 13, 1843; 3.) John Wilson letter (State vs. Mabrey & Evans); 4.) Jefferson Davis letter, July 25, 2850; 5.) George Walton letter, January 23, 1709
to George Walton by Edward Telfair( )

1 edition published in 1774 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Asking for answers to specific questions that relate to the validity of the Will of John Rae and the distribution of his assets; replying, Walton says he has answered the questions "agreeable to the Books & Rules of practice."
Signers of the Constitution of the United States :( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A collection of 82 autograph letters and documents signed by the signers of the Constitution of the United States and by non-signing members of the Federal Convention. Items in the collection have been described individually in separate catalog records (MA 555.1-82; see related records for more information
Augusta, to Seaborn Jones by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1780 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Advising "an immediate termination to your partnership with Mason. Our Governor has desired me to acquaint you that you shall be allowed for 4,000 dollars to be his private secretary for the year, and allow you to practice in the Courts beside. The late civil arrangement of the Assembly has left scarce any person but Jackson & yourself to practice; and it will be a fortunate circumstance for you, to take your seat at the Bar at a time when great abilities are not likely to be opposed to you, or even exerted. It will in particular be lucky for you to have the countenance of Government;" asking him to "Inquire of Captain Spencer whether Mrs. Walton's negroes & c were taken from her; and let me know every thing else you may learn respecting her;" asking him to send the money and the cloth and pay whatever is necessary; asking, in a postscript, "If the Town should look like Invasion, before you leave it, I wish my Phæton to be brought up; and Lucy & Nanny put out of the way."
Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1785 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Concerning payment of a debt
Augusta (Georgia) land indenture by Augusta (Ga.)( )

1 edition published in 1786 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Indenture giving a one-acre lot of land in Augusta, Ga. to merchant Thomas Graves, granted by the trustees for laying out and selling land in Augusta, George Walton, William Glascock, Samuel Jack, Abraham Baldwin, and Robert Forsyth. Witnessed by John Garrett and Seaborn Jones before Thomas Watkins, clerk
Augusta, Ga., to George Mathews by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1795 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Walton's opinion as chief justice of Georgia on the constitutional status of the state. Signed also by George Walker, Attorney General
Signers of the Declaration of Independence by A. S. W Rosenbach( )

in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Personal and official correspondence and legal documents written or signed by all 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence, most from the Revolutionary period. The papers relate chiefly to state and national political, financial, and military affairs. Correspondents include George Clinton, John Dickinson, William Lee, and George Washington
Philadelphia, to Benjamin Talifero by George Walton( )

1 edition published in 1796 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Reporting, at length and in detail, on a meeting he had just concluded with the Secretary of State [Timothy Pickering] and the Secretary of War [John McHenry] concerning the issues at hand for the Treaty with the Creeks; addressing their concerns over current hostilities and the possibilities of removing any difficulties in the path of a treaty; discussing the location of the signing; presenting, at length, his opinions on the pros and cons of Fort Fidius vs. Coleraine; recommending Fort Fidius for its logistical advantages; discussing the possible adjustment of claims at the time of signing and the numbers of people who should be allowed to attend; saying the Secretaries left without making a decision as to the place and it was now too late in the evening for him to check with others on this subject; saying that he wanted to get his summary of the meeting to him as quickly as possible; concluding that "There is little or nothing yet done in Congress. The Bill for Trading with the Indians will pass, with an appropriation for the purpose of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, under the direction of the President. It is an experiment of Government about which there are various opinions."
[Letter] 1789 Oct. 13, Augusta, [Georgia to] Colonel [Jared] Irwin by Georgia( )

1 edition published in 1789 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

This is a letter dated October 13, 1789 from George Walton, Governor of Georgia (1789), to Colonel Jared Irwin expressing both his concern and his surprise at the recent Indian depredations near the Oconee River. Walton notes that, although a treaty had not yet been signed, United States commissioners had recently received assurances from the chiefs of the Creek Nation, including Alexander McGillivray, that the Indians would not commit any more acts of violence until another attempt at a treaty could be made. Walton expresses his hope for peace but nevertheless cautions Irwin to remain on guard and promises to send him some ammunition. This letter is a response to cmt005, Irwin's letter to Walton informing him of the recent viole
 
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Audience level: 0.63 (from 0.02 for Meadow Gar ... to 0.95 for Augusta, G ...)

Alternative Names
George Walton American politician

George Walton Amerikaans politicus (1741-1804)

George Walton amerikai szenátor

George Walton amerikansk advokat och politiker

George Walton amerikansk advokat og politikar

George Walton amerikansk advokat og politiker

George Walton politicien américain

George Walton politico statunitense

George Walton prawnik i polityk amerykański

George Walton US-amerikanischer Politiker, Gouverneur von Georgia und US-Senator

Georgius Walton

Walton, George, 1740-1804

Walton, George, 1749 or 50-1804

Джордж Уолтон

ג'ורג' וולטון

جورج والتون سیاست‌مدار و وکیل آمریکایی

ジョージ・ウォルトン

Languages
English (60)